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National Retraining Scheme For Adults: £100 Million In The Chancellor’s Budget
October 31, 2018
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The following article was written by Dr Deirdre Hughes OBE

The Chancellors’ Budget (October 2018) allocates £100 million for the first phase of the National Retraining Scheme (NRS).

This will include “a new careers guidance service with expert advice to help people identify work opportunities in their area, and state-of-the-art courses combining online learning with traditional classroom teaching to develop key transferable skills.”

I suspect this will focus on work with adults in the workplace. Lots of questions about how this might fit into the current careers landscape in England?

In 2012, the new all-age National Careers Service originally had a clear agenda to provide universal careers support services deep in local communities and businesses. The budget circa £105m was mostly for adult career guidance. Over the next three years, funding for area-based Prime Contractors working with priority groups is circa £45m.

Read more

T-level Awareness Webinar
October 26, 2018
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CBI Responds to Apprenticeship Levy Reform Announcement
October 26, 2018
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Apprenticeship Levy reform is finally on the table, but the job is far from over

Following party conference season and ahead of next week’s Budget it’s important to understand what business are asking for when it comes to reform of the Apprenticeship Levy.

The Chancellor of the Exchequer, Phillip Hammond, announced a series of measures to improve the Apprenticeship Levy at the Conservative Party Conference in Birmingham. The CBI welcomed the news but cautioned that job of reforming the Levy has only just begun.

Read the Government announcement on Levy reform

The CBI has been campaigning for Apprenticeship Levy reform over the past 18 months, shining a light on businesses’ frustrations with the current design and the need for action to ensure it works in practice.

The government has now publicly acknowledged the need for reform, announcing three key CBI Budget recommendations as policy changes. Firstly, an increase in the amount employers can transfers to other firms; secondly, more resources to the Institute for Apprenticeships to help it to approve training schemes more quickly; and finally, a commitment to seek views on the operation of the Levy post-2020. Read more

Women in Management: Underrepresented & Overstretched?
October 25, 2018
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Women in Management: Article by DHM Associates

Despite years of gender equality legislation, men outnumber women in management positions by two to one.

While structural barriers continue to impede women’s career advancement, women themselves may be deterred from becoming managers if they perceive that it would have a negative impact on their working and personal lives. What is the experience of women in management roles and how can their underrepresentation in management be addressed? These are the questions this  policy brief published by Eurofound seeks to answer by looking at the job quality of managers, both female and male, and the impact a management job has on personal life.

This policy brief looks at the latest data on women in management from the 2015Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS).  It begins by clarifying the meaning of manager and identifies the different roles that exist under this banner. It looks at how management breaks down along gender lines according to type of manager, country, sector, company ownership, and the characteristics of reporting staff. It then turns to job quality, asking whether the working conditions of managers are better than those of non-managers and whether they are similar for women and men. Finally, it probes whether manager status influences men’s and women’s well-being differently and looks the experience of spillovers between work and personal life. Read more

The Classic Career Advice You Shouldn’t Forget, According to Oprah
October 24, 2018
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Oprah threw out some serious wisdom to the 2018 class at the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism’s recent commencement ceremonyOprah Winfrey

She started off her address to the world’s future writers, journalists, reporters, and speakers with the bad news: A lot’s going on in the world, and it’s not all great. The good news, she joked: “Many of your parents are probably taking you somewhere special for dinner tonight.”

Of course, the real good news she had for everyone in the audience was that “there really is a solution” to all our problems, and the solution is “each and every one of you.” (What else would you expect from the woman who, off-handedly, mentioned she’s been speaking to audiences for 25 years, ran the highest-rated daytime talk show, and has never missed a day of work in her life out of 4,561 episodes.)

But the meat of her speech—the part that had me thinking about my own career—was about old lessons becoming new again. Read more

Careers Guidance and Access for Education and Training Providers
October 23, 2018
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The statutory guidance for schools on providing careers guidance has been updated.

This statutory guidance is for:

  • headteachers
  • school staff
  • local authorities that maintain pupil referral units

Statutory guidance is issued by law; you must follow it unless there is a good reason not to. Read more

Proud to be Dyslexic

Matt Hancock talks to the Made By Dyslexia global summit about the challenges he has faced and the great benefits he has gained from being dyslexic.

 

My name’s Matt Hancock, I’m proud to be Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, a member of the Cabinet and of Made By DyslexiaThe Rt Hon Matt Hancock MP

And having not talked about it for almost the whole of my adult life, I’m proud to be here today at the Global Dyslexia Summit, saying to dyslexic people the world over: you can do it.

For years, dyslexia was seen as a problem. And sure, it brings its challenges.

For me, I find long words hard to spell, and dense writing hard to read. I get frustrated when people use long words when a short one will do.

But for me, for us, and for the world, let us say it loud and clear: dyslexia brings challenge ‒ your brain works in different ways, but with the right support, dyslexia brings big benefits too.

Dyslexia isn’t a disability, but a difference. It’s a distinction, not a drawback.

Read more

A Canadian ViewPoint: Supporting Clients with Mental Health Challenges
October 19, 2018
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Career development practitioners should take a holistic approach, supporting their clients’ mental health while helping them navigate career planning By Derrick McEachern

Career planning is a mental-health intervention and a well-being practice. What people do each day shapes who they are and how they feel about their daily lives

People who are disengaged from their work, unemployed, undergoing a work transition or ambivalent about their career path may struggle to varying degrees with stress, uncertainty, low self-worth, anxiety and, in many cases, depression. However, government programs traditionally focus solely on employment: helping people find work using their current skills or retraining them in specifically targeted fields with a high probability of employment.

Well-being and mental-health research (Walsh, 2011) suggest a more holistic approach is necessary. There is a need for more comprehensive services that account for employees’ lifestyle factors and support employee engagement and retention while also addressing mental-health problems.

Well-being and mental health

In their book Wellbeing: The Five Essential Elements, Tom Rath and Jim Harter document research conducted across 155 countries that suggests five interconnected elements are predictive of overall well-being. Read more

Apprenticeships: Parents Pack
October 18, 2018
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This Parents’ Pack is full of resources aimed at helping parents understand the benefits of apprenticeships, including translated resources, dates for your diary and 6 ways to keep informed! We encourage schools to disseminate this helpful pack through their parent comms channels.

Parent-Pack-October-2018

Overcoming Barriers to Returning to Work after a Mental-Health Leave
October 18, 2018
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How clients can learn to recognize stressors and develop strategies to better manage them during career change By Mary Ann Baynton

Any transition in life can be stressful. Career transition in particular often happens at the same time as other life stressors, including personal, family, health or financial concerns. Recognizing our current reactions to stress and choosing healthier, more effective responses is what building resilience is all abou

Resilience is the capacity to adapt or recover from stressful situations, including a transition into the workforce or from one job to another. Building resilience doesn’t mean you’ll avoid stress. What it means is that you’ll be able to cope better and recover from stress more effectively.

Research has helped us understand practical strategies to build resilience.

Identifying our stress responses

For most of us, stress is a daily occurrence and our responses to it are automatic. This means we don’t choose or plan them. With that in mind, if we can identify some of our immediate responses to stress, we’re more likely to recognize and address them before they create a major life or health concern.

Some automatic responses can be physical in nature – cold sores, hives, and sweating or stomach problems. Some may be behavioural responses such as reaching for a substance, sleep pattern changes, clumsiness, forgetfulness, impatience, overscheduling or overworking. Emotional responses may also be present and could include irritability, anger, frustration or emotional outbursts. Read more

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