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ESFA Update: 19 September 2018

Latest information and actions from the Education and Skills Funding Agency for academies, schools, colleges, local authorities and further education providers.

Five Ways to Boost Social Mobility Through Skills
September 20, 2018
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A new report from the 5% Club calls for a bigger role for work experience in schools and colleges. By George Ryan 

Improving the quality of work experience and careers advice in schools and colleges is critical to enabling social mobility, a new report states.

 
The 5% Club is a membership organisation of employers committed to increasing the number of “earn and learn” skills training opportunities, including apprenticeships. In its new Playing to our strengths: Unlocking social mobility for economic good report, the organisation sets out a number of measures it believes would increase social mobility in the UK through changes to the skills system. Here is a summary of their recommendations:
1. Links between schools, colleges and employers need strengthening

Employers should develop strong links with schools and colleges in deprived areas and increase the access young people in those areas have to workplaces, mentors and work experience.

Read more

ESFA: Course Directory
September 20, 2018
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The course directory contains information on courses offered by learning providers who are contracted with the Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA).FundingFunding

 

 

 

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/sfa-course-directory

11 Words of Careers Advice from Richard Branson’s Mum
September 19, 2018
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The following article is by Melanie Curtin,  writer and activist whose work has been featured in the Huffington Post, the New York Observer and on the Today Show in Australia. She holds a master’s in communication from Stanford University.

Richard Branson is a force of nature.
In addition to being an actual knight, he is the founder of the Virgin Group, which now controls more than 400 companies. His net worth is $5 billion, which puts him seventh on a list of the wealthiest British billionaires. Plus, he’s known for being a compassionate boss and an icon of entrepreneurship.
He wasn’t always that successful, though.

As a boy, he struggled with dyslexia. In a blog on the subject, he wrote a letter to his younger self, saying:

“I know you’re struggling at school and I wanted to give you some advice on how to become the best you can be, even when it’s difficult and you feel like the world is against you. You should never see being different as a flaw or think that something is wrong with you. Being different is your biggest asset and will help you succeed.”

Embrace his difference he did. As a teenager, he named his company “Virgin” because he lacked real experience in business.He’s not a virgin anymore.But no one is an island (even if they own a private one). The fact is, the mentors and influences we have growing up have a profound influence on who we become. And Richard Branson had a major advantage in that department: his mother, Eve.Eve Branson was just as much of a force of nature as little Ricky.

For example, once, on the way home from a shopping trip, Branson’s mother left him alone in the countryside. She gave him basic instructions on how to find his own way home, then left.He was 5 years old. In his words:

“[It was] about three miles through the countryside [to get home]…. She was punishing me for causing mischief in the back seat, but she was also teaching me a larger lesson about overcoming my disabling shyness and learning to ask others for directions.”

Read more

ViewPoint: Good Governance Must be Pursued by all Providers’
September 19, 2018
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What does good governance look like for independent training providers, asks Dr Sue Pember

When we see the annual summer education headlines on television and in newspapers – the GCSE exam results, back to school and university, etc – we can be tempted to make the mistake of forgetting the
ViewPoint:ongoing work of the independent sector, which works with employers, apprentices and trainees all year round. This is something we should correct.

Independent training providers are vital to the nation’s success and make up a significant part of this country’s skills provision and training, but often they only make the press when something goes wrong – and often this is a breakdown of governance. Therefore, good governance is key to achieving success, improving reputation and safeguarding the longevity of the sector.

In the world of corporate governance, achieving good governance is not a new pursuit, and debates as to what it looks like have been raging for many years; when it fails it can have dire effects on a company. So, like all essentially contested concepts, what we know and understand by the term “good governance” may never be fully understood, but it is now time to take that debate into the independent training sector.

Clear principles ‘are vital’ Read more

Employing People with Autism Spectrum Condition
September 18, 2018
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Remploy’s Vocational Rehabilitation Consultant, Harry McPhillimy talks about supporting employees with Autism Spectrum Condition. Read his blog below.

Autism, Asperger Syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disorder are all terms used to describe a particular neurodiverse spectrum of associated traits.

Remploy

The term Autism Spectrum Condition (ASC), better reflects the range of strengths and challenges associated with this. There is a saying that when you have met one person with autism, you have met one person with autism. There is such variation in how different people experience it. Nevertheless, we know it is associated with difficulties in social communication and interaction, restricted areas of interest, difficulty managing change and sensory sensitivities. It can encompass attention to detail, great subject knowledge and problem-solving skills.

However, medical knowledge is not necessary to support your employees with ASC. In fact, the most important information to know is how the individual is impacted at work to help them achieve their maximum capability and the support of a specialist advisor can be the key to enabling this.

Sometimes organisations find out they have recruited someone with ASC after they have been taken on. In fact, I have supported employees who had not even recognised their own ASC traits until their child had received that diagnosis and they realised they themselves shared many of those traits. This then helped to make sense of their previous struggles and gave them a model they could use for dealing with issues at work, and home. Read more

Careers Advice for Parents

Careers advice for parents is a website developed by Carolyn Parry, the CDI’s Careers Adviser/Coach of the Year in 2017 and Project Associate (Wales).

There is a wealth of useful free material addressed to parents (use the Topics and Blog menus) as well as the course for teenagers, which requires a paid subscription.

Visit the website HERE

 

 

Careers Advice for Adults: £9 Saved for Every £1 Spent
September 17, 2018
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The following report was published by Dr Deirdre Hughes OBE on her website http://dmhassociates.org

In late 2017, the Board of Careers Yorkshire and the Humber: National Careers Service commissioned dhm associates to undertake an economic review and analysis of the productivity and economic benefits of the service.

The period under review focuses on data available from early 2015 – mid year 2017 and the primary focus is on face-to-face careers guidance for adults. To access the full report: Productivity and Economic Benefits Report 140918

Three key questions

  • What level of fiscal return does the National Careers Service: Careers Yorkshire and the Humber make to HM Treasury?
  • Is the National Careers Service priority target group, set by the Education & Skills Funding Agency (ESFA), linked to a payment by results, sufficient to meet regional/local needs?
  • What lies ahead in Yorkshire and the Humber when it comes to the National Careers Service face-to-face careers guidance work with adults in the coming year(s)?

Read more

ViewPoint: New Approach to Funding Apprenticeships will Provide Better Value for Money
September 17, 2018
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A new approach to funding apprenticeships will provide better value for money so that people can benefit from the training opportunities on offer and progress in their careers, says Anne Milton writing in FE Week.

I have spoken a lot about the important changes we are making to improve the quality of apprenticeships in this country.

 One of the biggest changes has been to introduce apprenticeship standards – new, high-quality apprenticeships replacing the older “frameworks”. I’m really pleased that the number of people starting these apprenticeships has increased by almost 1,000 per cent in the last year. Of those starting apprenticeships only 2.5 per cent were on standards this time last year, and now it’s over 40 per cent.

Apprenticeship standards are designed by employers themselves. By putting employers in the driving seat, we make sure that apprentices receive the training they need and make sure people have the skills businesses are crying out for, so they can get on and grow their career.

Since its creation in April 2017, the Institute for Apprenticeships has been responsible for managing the development of these new apprenticeship standards. Their work includes advising me about the right funding level for each new standard that is approved.

Read more

Careers England Newsletter 133
September 17, 2018
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