Avatar
Hello
Guest
Log In or Sign Up
Careers Advice for Adults: £9 Saved for Every £1 Spent
September 17, 2018
0

The following report was published by Dr Deirdre Hughes OBE on her website http://dmhassociates.org

In late 2017, the Board of Careers Yorkshire and the Humber: National Careers Service commissioned dhm associates to undertake an economic review and analysis of the productivity and economic benefits of the service.

The period under review focuses on data available from early 2015 – mid year 2017 and the primary focus is on face-to-face careers guidance for adults. To access the full report: Productivity and Economic Benefits Report 140918

Three key questions

  • What level of fiscal return does the National Careers Service: Careers Yorkshire and the Humber make to HM Treasury?
  • Is the National Careers Service priority target group, set by the Education & Skills Funding Agency (ESFA), linked to a payment by results, sufficient to meet regional/local needs?
  • What lies ahead in Yorkshire and the Humber when it comes to the National Careers Service face-to-face careers guidance work with adults in the coming year(s)?

Read more

Sutton Trust: PARENT POWER 2018
September 14, 2018
0

In 2013 the Sutton Trust published Parent Power?a landmark piece of work authored by Prof Becky Francis and Prof Merryn Hutchings demonstrating how social class influences parents’ ability to support their children in their schooling. Five years later Parent Power 2018 revisits the cultural and financial resources parents use to boost their children’s chances of educational success.

Based on a survey conducted by YouGov, the Sutton Trust’s Rebecca Montacute and Carl Cullinane find similar trends to those found in 2013. From choosing the best school to attend, to paying for out of school extracurricular activities, better-off parents continue to have the upper hand when it comes to navigating the education system and preventing their children from falling behind in school.

The report also reveals new challenges. The ‘hidden costs’ of education such as uniforms and travel expenses are an increasing concern for parents from lower socioeconomic backgrounds, while schools are demonstrating increasing reliance on extra financial contributions from parents following recent school budget cuts.

KEY FINDINGS
  • When choosing what school to send their child to, parents with higher socioeconomic backgrounds were more likely to attend open days, read Ofsted reports, speak to parents at the school, read league tables and consult local authority or other education websites.
  • Parents in lower socioeconomic groups were more likely to indicate that the cost of travel, and potential extra financial costs such as uniforms, played a significant role in their decision making. Over half of working class parents (56%), compared to 34% of professional parents.
  • Just one in five parents (20%) reported that they were familiar with Progress 8, the Department for Education’s new headline measure for school league tables.
  • Parents in higher socioeconomic groups were much more likely to report a variety of strategies to gain access to their preferred school, such as moving to an area with good schools or to a specific catchment, along with employing private tutors for entrance tests. Read more
Labour Market Outlook – Summer 2018
September 7, 2018
0

The latest Labour Market Outlook: Summer 2018 produced by CIPD in partnership with The Adecco Group reports that while overall employment remains high, recruitment difficulties and stagnating pay growth will post challenges for employers in the months ahead.

There is a continuing high demand for skills that is failing to be met by sufficient supply. Two-thirds of employers are reporting that their vacancies are proving hard to fill and the average number of applicants per vacancy has dropped across all skill levels. Despite these factors putting upward pressure on wages, organisations are limited in their ability to offer raises for all staff due to weak productivity.

Interestingly they also conclude that improvements in management capability and workforce productivity will not happen unless there is greater investment in nudging, encouraging and supporting firms, to raise their management game. CIPD research suggests that the provision of high-quality HR support to small firms at a local level embedded through key partnerships such as LEPs, chambers of commerce and local authorities has the potential to reach large numbers of employers and make a material difference to confidence and capability – and support productivity growth.

Schools and Employers Must Collaborate to Help Young People into Work
September 5, 2018
0

Off the back of last week’s GCSE results, research published by HR Magazine, shows parents feel more must be done by employers and schools to provide work experience for young people.

Most parents (82%) believe schools and employers need to work more closely to prepare their children for the workplace, according to research from the Chartered Management Institute (CMI)

The survey also highlighted that despite 78% of parents believing work experience provides the best way for young people to gain employability skills, only 32% agree that employers are actually doing enough to provide that work experience.

Separate CMI research showed that 85% of employers want students to have gained work experience.

It found that parents are roughly as confident about the careers advice they give their children (56%) as they are in that provided by their children’s schools (54%).

Parents’ views play an important role in students’ decision-making. In previous research, 77% of young people said that parents are their number one source of careers advice when leaving school.

Read more

Over-50s Plan to Work Longer
August 17, 2018
0

Older workers feel unsupported by their employers, despite estimates that a third of the UK workforce will be aged over 50 by 2020

Almost two-thirds (63%) of workers aged over 50 in the UK are planning to retire later than they thought they would 10 years ago, according to research from Aviva.

Many of them are extending their working lives because of the rising cost of living (40%) and insufficient pension savings (38%

Despite these plans to carry on working longer, 44% feel unsupported by their employers when it comes to their career ambitions and objectives, compared to just 25% of 25- to 34-year-olds who feel this way.

Progress has also been slow in helping older employees adapt to a longer working life. Factors, such as the ability to work flexitime, have only increased slightly from 12% in 2012 to 14% in 2018. Meanwhile access to other forms of workplace support – including guidance on retirement finances – has remained static.

The research highlighted the benefits of supporting an ageing workforce. For older workers who do have access to support, three-quarters (75%) agree it was useful, with a fifth (21%) stating workplace support played an important role in their later-life planning.

When asked what form of support they would find useful from their employer, 14% said the ability to reduce working hours or flexitime; 9% said written literature on the financial issues surrounding retirement; 11% said free, independent financial advice; and 6% said a dedicated staff member to talk to about the issues. Read more

Latest CIPD Labour Market Outlook Summer 2018
August 14, 2018
0

The Labour Market Outlook for the third quarter of 2018 is based on survey responses from 2,001 employers across the UK.

In addition to providing a general picture of market trends, the findings will also have important significance for employers and HR. For the first time, the CIPD has created dedicated guidance to accompany the report, with recommendations on how to frame a practice response to best capture surfacing opportunities and mitigate potential risks.

Download the report and practitioners’ guide below:

Read more

Hospitality Struggling to Keep Workers
August 13, 2018
0

The hospitality sector is facing high turnover rates that could worsen after Brexit, according to research

Unsociable working hours (69%), low pay and benefits (63%), and lack of career prospects (35%) were the top three reasons people cited for leaving the sector in YouGov and software company Deputy’s Retaining Britain’s Hospitality Workers report. As a result, the sector has a retention rate of just 70%, it stated.

For this research, Deputy calculated that hospitality in the UK has an employee turnover rate of 30% (meaning three out of 10 workers leave their role within a year). This is double that of the UK average, and forecast to get worse after Brexit.

However, close to half (42%) of UK employees are either employed in the industry or have worked in it at some point, the report highlighted.

Just 40% of respondents said they believe it is viable to have a long-term career in the sector, however, rising to 62% for those currently working in hospitality.

Respondents were asked what would make employees in the sector less likely to leave. Factors cited were: better pay and benefits (cited by 63%), more control over shift patterns (55%), a more stable income and guaranteed work (52%), better career prospects (42%), and more transparency regarding shifts and scheduling (32%). Read more

The Latest UK Economic Outlook
August 2, 2018
0

The latest UK Economic Outlook from pwc is now out and takes a look at AI.

From a data analytics points of view, AI could create about twice as many jobs as it displaces in the long run within the broad “professional, scientific and technical” group.

“These jobs are likely to take the form of what MIT researchers have referred to as ‘explainers’ and ‘sustainers’ – jobs involved with designing, operating and communicating AI and related technologies”. “A key insight here is that, as prediction becomes cheaper due to advances in machine learning, so expert human judgement to access what action to take for a given set of probabilistic predictions will become more valuable”.

Other general points:
• Estimate of existing jobs that will actually be automated over next 20 years – 20%.
• 46% of long term UK output growth will come from AI (around 0.9% growth per annum on average).

Download the Report Here

Education Policy Institute: Annual Report On The State Of Education In England
July 27, 2018
0

The following was published by dmh associate.

The Education Policy Institute (EPI) has published its Annual Report on the state of education in England – including the progress made in closing the gap in attainment between disadvantaged pupils and their peers

The Education in England: Annual Report 2018 considers how the disadvantage gap has changed since 2011 and how it varies across the country.

The report also looks at how pupils from different backgrounds perform, and, for the first time, looks at the post-16 routes taken by disadvantaged students and their peers. The underlying causes of educational disadvantage are also examined – with several policy recommendations proposed.

Some of the key findings are :

  • Pupil attainment is rising but disadvantaged children are still behind at every stage.
  • On current trends, it will take over 100 years to close the gap in English and maths.
  • Overall, there is little change in the gap in school attainment between disadvantaged pupils and their peers.
  • On the best measure of the disadvantaged gap at the end of secondary education (the English Language and Maths gap), there has been a significant slowdown in the rate of gap closure over the last few years – threatening the ambition of significantly greater social mobility.
  • For the most persistently disadvantaged pupils, there has been no closure at all in the (English and Maths), disadvantaged gap since 2011.
  • At secondary level, the disadvantage gap across all GCSE subjects closed faster than in previous years.
  • However the apparent narrowing of the disadvantage gap is caused largely by more disadvantaged pupils entering more ‘academic’ subjects.

Read more

Researching Careers in Careers
July 23, 2018
0

The International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) at the University of Derby, is undertaking research to find out why career changers choose to work in the career development sector.

Little is known about the Career Development workforce and we would like to better understand the enablers and barriers to attracting new people to our profession.

The Centre and the CDI are interested in the views of practitioners working with adults who have moved into the career development field. They are keen to find out about what attracted you and how you see your career progressing. We value your thoughts on this topic.

All information will be anonymised. Please complete the short survey which can be accessed here

The survey is open until 30th July 2018. 

For more information contact Dr Siobhan Neary, Head of iCeGS at s.neary@derby.ac.uk

 

IAG Online is Stephen Fry proof thanks to caching by WP Super Cache