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Online Career Resources
November 6, 2018
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The following set of resources have been put together by www.visualcv.com

The hardest part of finding a job is getting started…

There are so many tools, resources, and technologies out there that just beginning your search or career development can seem overwhelming.

How can you find a job or further your career when you can’t even find the best tools to help you?

Well, we’re here to help. In this job search resources list we have carefully curated all the best job search articles and websites, so your focus can be on looking for the right job instead of looking for the right tools.


 

Skills on the Move
November 5, 2018
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The following blog was shared by DMH Associates. 

Migration has been at the centre of political debate across the OECD in recent years. Drawing on data from the OECD Survey of Adult Skills (PIAAC), this report provides new evidence on differences in migrants’ characteristics and contexts and considers how these relate to the skills migrants possess.

It also examines the relationship between migrants’ skills and their labour and non-labour market outcomes in host countries. Finally, it sheds new light on how migrants’ skills are developed, used and valued in host country labour markets and societies. Results and lessons gleaned from analysis highlight the way forward for future research on this topic.

The report represents an invaluable resource for policy makers across different sectors as they design and implement strategies aimed at promoting the long-term integration of foreign-born populations in the economic and social life of their countries. The analyses presented allow us to identify the skill composition of foreign-born populations, the labour market and broader social outcomes associated with such skills, and the factors that can promote skill acquisition and skill use. Read more

A Canadian ViewPoint: Supporting Clients with Mental Health Challenges
October 19, 2018
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Career development practitioners should take a holistic approach, supporting their clients’ mental health while helping them navigate career planning By Derrick McEachern

Career planning is a mental-health intervention and a well-being practice. What people do each day shapes who they are and how they feel about their daily lives

People who are disengaged from their work, unemployed, undergoing a work transition or ambivalent about their career path may struggle to varying degrees with stress, uncertainty, low self-worth, anxiety and, in many cases, depression. However, government programs traditionally focus solely on employment: helping people find work using their current skills or retraining them in specifically targeted fields with a high probability of employment.

Well-being and mental-health research (Walsh, 2011) suggest a more holistic approach is necessary. There is a need for more comprehensive services that account for employees’ lifestyle factors and support employee engagement and retention while also addressing mental-health problems.

Well-being and mental health

In their book Wellbeing: The Five Essential Elements, Tom Rath and Jim Harter document research conducted across 155 countries that suggests five interconnected elements are predictive of overall well-being. Read more

Breaking into the Classroom: 5 Tips to Integrate Career Components into Student Coursework
October 2, 2018
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The author of this article is Nicole Poff, MA, a Career Services Specialist and Online Associate Faculty member at Ashford University San Diego, California. As a Career Services Specialist, Nicole works collaboratively across the university to embed career service components into the classroomNicole Poff

At a recent conference, a fellow attendee complained: “Our students are so over-programmed with university initiatives that our department can’t compete for attention.”

Another attendee responded, “Well, you should consider yourself lucky – we have such a small department that our calendars are completely booked with student appointments, so we have no time to create programming.” Over the next hour, counsellors from across the country shared their career services dilemmas. One small complaint created a domino effect of career counsellors revealing their strongest pain points. Beyond just over-programming and a small department, some of the most common issues were: lack of student engagement, limited funds, low workshop attendance, unprepared students, and overzealous students who expect to become CEOs upon graduation.

Uncertain about how my peers would respond, I anxiously raised my hand and said: “We don’t have a huge budget; we have a pretty small team in comparison to our massive student and alumni population; our engagement is frequently subpar, but we have found that integrating career components into existing courses is working very well for us. In fact, we have successfully integrated career service components into a lot of our education courses, and we are seeing great success.” At that moment, I was met with both curiosity and resistance as other counsellors asked, “Would curriculum integration work for us? If so, how?” Read more

International ViewPoint: Injecting Hope into the World of Careers
October 1, 2018
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The following was written by Jim Bright, Professor of Career Education and Development at Austrailian Catholic University (ACU), and was published in The Sydney Morning Herald

Imagine if a school or college could offer the promise of moving students from mostly D grades to mostly A grades, could increase their engagement with learning and give them a clearer and more confident sense of their vocational identity. Too good to be true? Well perhaps not, according to a team of Canadian and US researchers who have made and connectedIllustration: Kerrie Leishman the missing links between career counselling and positive psychology.

Recently here I wrote about my concerns that some schools appear to have embraced positive psychology so uncritically that they have all but abandoned properly informed career counselling. I argued that this was an over-reaction. However, what I like about this North American research is the way that key concepts in positive psychology have been employed in the service of career counselling and education, rather than erroneously supplanting it.

Spencer Niles, Norman Amundson and Hyung Joon Yoon from William and Mary College, University of British Columbia and Pennsylvania State University have developed a hope-centred model of career development. The central notions combine hope, self-clarity, vision, planning and adaptability.

What sets this work apart is that they have conducted large-scale studies in educational settings linking these concepts to measures such as a person’s confidence in and clarity of their career interests, talents and personality. They also linked hope to student engagement – for instance, the degree to which a student spontaneously worked harder than they thought to meet a teacher’s expectations. Finally, they linked it to the very tangible measure of grade-point average – the number of As, Bs, Cs or Ds that a student is achieving. Read more

6 Tips for Getting Back in the Game After Long-Term Unemployment
September 12, 2018
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starting work after unemployment

The following article appeared in CareerSidekick.com – an American careers company helping people save time and stress in their job search and get hired for better jobs.

With the low unemployment rate, many people who haven’t been able to find jobs in the past are going back to work.

If you’ve been unemployed for a long stretch of time, you too may be headed back into the workforce. And, if you’ve been out of work for a significant amount of time, you may be feeling a mix of emotions about this next step.

It’s normal to feel a heady mix of relief and anxiety (as well as excitement and fear) when you’re heading back into a job after an extended period of unemployment. To soothe your nerves and allay your fears, we’ve come up with a list of 6 tips for easing your way back into a job.

1. Adopt work-friendly habits in advance

One of the perks of being unemployed is the ability to eat, sleep, and socialize whenever you feel like it. Once you have a job, however, you’ll have to adhere to a schedule, which can be a major shock to the system.

To soften the blow, once you get your job offer, do your best to start getting back into a schedule that lines up with what your work schedule will be.

Start eating regular meals, adjust your workout schedule, and start going to sleep and waking up at times that will line up with your new work schedule.

2. Pare down your outside obligations

If you’ve been unemployed for a really long time, your mind might be slightly blown by how tired you are in the first few weeks of your new job. Your body will be adjusting to a new schedule and your mind will be spinning with all of the new things you are learning.

So, at least for a little while, take it easy on making plans during your workweek. Whenever possible, plan to pare down your weekday social activities to the bare minimum. Don’t underestimate how tiring it can be to get back into a routine. Remember it’s only temporary. Within a few weeks you’ll be on solid ground at work and will have more stamina for socializing.

3. Be humble

Once you begin your new job, remember that it’s okay to be the rookie. Ease into your role in the beginning.

Set realistic goals for yourself and don’t try to do it all or learn it all in your first week. Enthusiasm is a great quality at work but give yourself some time to be an observer of your colleagues and your environment so that you can learn the flow of things.

4. Don’t be a know-it-all

Long periods of unemployment can create insecurity in people and light a fire under them to burst through the door of a new job ready to prove themselves. But taking the place by storm might not be the best approach.

Remember, you were hired because you have the right skill set. So instead of walking through the door, ready to start taking names and kicking butt, take a deep breath and give yourself permission to start slowly. Ask a lot of questions, and admit that you have a lot of learning to do. This will not only take some pressure off of you but being humble about your knowledge will put your coworkers at ease.

5. Get to know your coworkers

Making a friend at work is a great way to begin to settle into a new job. For one, having someone who is available to answer questions large and small will help you feel a little less lost.

From simple things like, “Where is the printer?” to more complicated questions like, “Which health plan did you choose?” a coworker will help you get oriented far faster than trying to muddle through alone.

Also, if you’ve been out of the workforce for a while, you may already feel slightly out of place in your new job. Making friends with your teammates or colleagues will ensure you’ll have someone to have coffee or lunch with, which will alleviate the anxiety of being the new kid in the cafeteria with no one to sit with.

6. Let your boss be the boss

If you have gone back to work in a different field, or have taken a less-senior role in your industry, you’ll have to adjust to your new circumstances. So, while you may have been at the top of the totem pole in your last job, someone else is chief now. It’s okay to share your experience but remember that you aren’t the boss anymore. Let your supervisor do his or her job without having a chip on your shoulder about your current job title.

About this guest author:

Since 2005, LiveCareer has been developing tools that have helped over 10 million users build stronger resumes, write persuasive cover letters, and develop better interview skills. Land the job you want faster using our free resume examples and resume templates, writing guides, and easy-to-use resume builder.

The Best Jobs in Australia for 2018
July 6, 2018
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Global jobs site Indeed has analysed its search data for Australia, uncovering the best local jobs.

Indeed examined tens-of-thousands of job posts to identify well-paid roles that have seen remarkable levels of growth and present great opportunities for job seekers or those considering future career options.

Technology, building and construction, health and medical care are the key areas seeing demand increase.

More than half the roles have average salaries of more than $100,000 and all exceed $80,000.

The number one in-demand job is lead teacher, which has seen extraordinary growth over the past three years amid shortages of more senior level teachers with team leadership experience. The average base salary for a lead teacher is $92,723.

Tech

Full stack developer leads the way in terms of IT jobs growth, followed by data scientist, technology assistant and information systems manager, which are also among the highest paid positions with technology assistant the highest on the list at $141,738 on average. Read more

From Careers to Experiences
June 29, 2018
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The following article was first published in The Wall Street Journal.

In the 21st century, careers may no longer be narrowly defined by highly structured jobs and skills, but by experiences and learning agility.

As technology becomes increasingly central to organizations’ business models and ability to compete, many successful CIOs have prioritized building and maintaining the pools of talent required to meet new challenges. Such efforts include recruiting and hiring top talent and then finding ways to keep these employees engaged, challenged, and advancing within their organizations.

What does the modern career path look like? It’s evolving into a series of developmental experiences, each offering a person the opportunity to acquire new skills, perspectives, and judgment. Among 10 trends highlighted in Deloitte’s 2018 Global Human Capital Trends report, 84 percent of survey respondents cite “from careers to experiences” as very important or important, making it the third most singled-out trend this year, yet only 37 percent think they are very ready or ready to address this transition (Figure 1).

Read more

Why is There a Skills Shortage in Hospitality in Australia?
June 29, 2018
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The way food is celebrated in Victoria, you wouldn’t think there would be any issue with hospitality staff. The industry is booming, with new restaurants, bars and cafes opening every week, covered relentlessly by a myriad of media (think Broadsheet, The Urban List, Zomato, Time Out etc).

While Melbourne seems to be coping well, there is a skills shortage in hospitality throughout regional Victoria, which is a concern for the vast array of rural offerings in the sector. The success of Brae (number 44 on the Best 50 Restaurants in the World list) in Birregurra, Igni (Geelong) and Lake House (Daylesford) is dependent not just on the quality of their food but the overall experience, which includes service from accomplished industry professionals.

The situation wasn’t helped by the announcement of the 2018-2019 Federal Budget, which didn’t exactly do the vocational sector many favours. In fact, government funding for VET has been on the sharp decline since 2011, while school and higher education has tracked in the opposite direction. At last count, there was just $5.7 billion invested in VET, as opposed to higher
education ($25.9 billion).

This isn’t a great incentive for young people to throw themselves into the vocational education sector, where most of the formal training for roles in hospitality takes place. A reluctance to pour more resources into VET could see Melbourne miss out on the next wave of chefs, bartenders and sommeliers. For context, celebrity chef George Calombaris studied at the Box Hill Institute of TAFE before building his Greek restaurant empire.

However, chefs in the mould of Gordon Ramsay may be influencing prospective workers in a negative way. After all, who would want to turn up to work and be screamed at the way that employees on Ramsay’s Kitchen Nightmares are? While much of this is clearly manufactured drama, there is little doubt it would play on the minds of those considering a career in hospitality.

Read more

Podcasts: Innovating Employment
May 29, 2018
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In this range of podcasts, the OCWI team, interview experts from across the workforce development sector to explore a broad range of topics and issues impacting the day to day work of employment & training professionals across Ontario. Issues which are not dissimilar to those faced by the sector in the UK.

Episode 1: Skills-based hiring – improving employment options for vulnerable populations

Susanna Williams, Founder and Lead Consultant at BridgeEd Strategies, joins the program to discuss skills-based hiring, Innovate+Educate’s Close It Summit happening this October in Brooklyn NY, and how to look beyond traditional pathways and education to better connect workers to jobs, and employers to workers with the right skills.

Read more

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