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10 Famous People Who Were Apprentices
June 30, 2020
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Apprenticeships have been around for centuries, originally in manual trades such as stone masonry, painting and plumbing.

They’ve come a long way and below are some familiar faces who started out their careers as an apprentice.

Jamie Oliver – Like many chefs, Jamie started his career as a catering apprentice. After leaving school with only two GCSE qualifications, his apprenticeship has definitely helped him to succeed in his chosen career.

Sir Ian Mckellan – Sir Ian didn’t go to a drama school like most other big-name actors, but instead he completed a three-year apprenticeship at the Belgrade Theatre in Coventry.

Karen Millen – The famous designer started her career as an apprentice, studying at the Medway College of Design in Rochester. She also sold t-shirts to her friends on the side, before opening her first shop.

Stella McCartney – Like Alexander McQueen, McCartney started her fashion career as an apprentice tailor with Edward Sexton on Savile Row. Read more

From Careers to Experiences
June 30, 2020
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The following article was first published in The Wall Street Journal in 2018.

In the 21st century, careers may no longer be narrowly defined by highly structured jobs and skills, but by experiences and learning agility.

As technology becomes increasingly central to organizations’ business models and ability to compete, many successful CIOs have prioritized building and maintaining the pools of talent required to meet new challenges. Such efforts include recruiting and hiring top talent and then finding ways to keep these employees engaged, challenged, and advancing within their organizations.

What does the modern career path look like? It’s evolving into a series of developmental experiences, each offering a person the opportunity to acquire new skills, perspectives, and judgment. Among 10 trends highlighted in Deloitte’s 2018 Global Human Capital Trends report, 84 percent of survey respondents cite “from careers to experiences” as very important or important, making it the third most singled-out trend this year, yet only 37 percent think they are very ready or ready to address this transition (Figure 1).

Read more

Making the Shift to Online Career Coaching
June 29, 2020
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Published by the Australian Careers Service.

By Karen Lomas 

Many of us have been forced to shift from long-utilised methods of in-person career coaching to new systems of delivery and service. We’ve all had to adapt as quickly as possible to school closures and social distancing while continuing to support our students and clients. Making the shift to online career coaching has been key. 

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I have been utilising online platforms for quite some time; however, COVID-19 has meant a shift away from anything delivered face-to-face. Here is my personal reflection on this period of churn. 

The initial slow-down 

For me, COVID-19 lock-down policies resulted, for a short while, in an almost total suspension of work. In particular, revenue for March dived in comparison to revenue for March 2019. In addition to being bed-bound with illness for a five days, a project I was working on was suspended. 

Another issue was that families lost income, as some were either furloughed on reduced pay, or laid off. The JobSeeker and JobKeeper schemes had not yet come into play. I felt the need to offer some discounts and it felt good to be able to do this. Then I waited and things picked up. Sometimes there’s nothing else for it but to be patient.  

Changing my business model 

I went from running a career office that clients attended in person, to an all-online careers service. This shift meant marketing the new provision of career coaching via my website and on social media. This costs money because I have to pay for back end support on my website.

Once I mastered Zoom, I had to learn how to use Webex quickly, then keep on top of the deluge of information coming from Victorian Tertiary Admissions Centre, Career Development Association of Australia, Careers Industry Council of Australia, Careers Education Association of Victoria, tertiary providers, my Careers Group and from virtual careers expo organisers. It was super intense for a while. 

I now use both of those Webex and Zoom platforms and lock my meetings, but do not take recordings. I did this upon the advice of CICA. In a discussion with my Careers Networking Group I realised that schools have different policies, so I was anxious about the fact that while school-based career practitioners had policies that protected them, I had to abide by a different set of rules. I have to rely on my handwritten notes and the interview summary that I share with my clients. For sure, I have insurance policies and the backing of my professional associations.  

In my private practice regarding counselling with children, I always obtained written permission from parents to counsel their child, whether it be online or in-person. If a child is happy for their parent to be present during their coaching session, I accommodate this. The preamble is a little longer with online counselling — the assurances around the session not being recorded, and that when I look away it’s because I’m taking notes ( not because I’m tickling the cat)! 

Challenges my clients are facing 

The language that I was hearing and reading from parents and students was challenging. Many admitted they weren’t coping, and there were parents who said their Year 12 child was thinking of dropping out of school. When asked how they were doing, clients were increasingly circling the word ‘anxious’. 

Some students and young adults do not wish to turn on their screen during sessions, therefore I cannot look for clues from their body language. Then again, there is the potential for the disinhibition effect — the potential benefit of distance, or the barrier created by the screen, and with respect to email and texting, the delay. Students and young adults are indeed divulging, so then it’s a case of listening actively and checking that they are, in fact okay.  

Challenges I’m facing 

Along with the above, there’s an increasing demand for services — and the fact that I don’t have any bells ringing to tell me that it’s lunchtime or time to knock off.  

With a new way of working, we have to protect ourselves from burn-out. I am indeed feeling tired and on one Friday, about a month ago, I was still at my desk at 7pm. That was not an easy day for me, as three students did not seem too good. I had to tell myself that something, just a smile, some words of encouragement will have helped them.  

An overall success 

Shifting to online career coaching has worked and this is gratifying. However, it has required a process of adjustment over which I have had very little control. When I set up my business, I was calling the shots. This year I, like all of us, have been forced to adjust my work in the face of what felt like what I might describe as ‘organised chaos’. It takes me back to a time early in my career when I was working in London and having to run a business despite IRA bomb scares and actual bombings. I recall my Assistant Manager saying on one such day, ‘Well, it’s character-building’. We had to laugh.

Karen  is a career coach specialising in early career exploration with school-aged students.  

Overcoming Barriers to Returning to Work after a Mental-Health Leave
June 26, 2020
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How clients can learn to recognize stressors and develop strategies to better manage them during career change By Mary Ann Baynton

Any transition in life can be stressful. Career transition in particular often happens at the same time as other life stressors, including personal, family, health or financial concerns. Recognizing our current reactions to stress and choosing healthier, more effective responses is what building resilience is all abou

Resilience is the capacity to adapt or recover from stressful situations, including a transition into the workforce or from one job to another. Building resilience doesn’t mean you’ll avoid stress. What it means is that you’ll be able to cope better and recover from stress more effectively.

Research has helped us understand practical strategies to build resilience.

Identifying our stress responses

For most of us, stress is a daily occurrence and our responses to it are automatic. This means we don’t choose or plan them. With that in mind, if we can identify some of our immediate responses to stress, we’re more likely to recognize and address them before they create a major life or health concern.

Some automatic responses can be physical in nature – cold sores, hives, and sweating or stomach problems. Some may be behavioural responses such as reaching for a substance, sleep pattern changes, clumsiness, forgetfulness, impatience, overscheduling or overworking. Emotional responses may also be present and could include irritability, anger, frustration or emotional outbursts. Read more

Investing in Infrastructure could Create More than a Million Jobs, says TUC
June 26, 2020
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Fast tracking spend on projects such as broadband networks, green technology, transport and housing could create 1.2 million jobs by 2022, according to a new report by the Trade Union Congress (TUC).

The report said investing in these key projects, which would cost the Treasury £85bn, would pay for itself by creating jobs across the economy and boosting growth and tax receipts. 

It called for a new ‘economic consensus’ on building out of the recession and doing everything possible to avoid the damage of mass unemployment post-coronavirus.

Projects suggested within the report included expanding and upgrading the rail network, which it predicted would create 120,000 new jobs, plus building new social housing and retrofitting existing social housing, creating a further 500,000 jobs. 

TUC warned the UK could “lose no time” in coming up with a rescue plan given there is less than a month until the government’s emergency budget. 

The union also warned ministers to create urgent support packages for the sectors of the economy worse hit by the coronavirus crisis, such as hospitality and recruitment, to avoid redundancies as the Job Retention Scheme is wound down. 

It suggested partial buyouts of struggling firms up to 30%, following the example of other countries. 

This would come with guarantees from companies to introduce fair pay plans, rein in executive pay, improve corporate governance structures and pay their fair share of tax. 

“The more people we can keep in work, the faster we’ll bounce back from this crisis. We should lose no time getting shovels in the ground,” said Frances O’Grady, TUC general secretary. 

“We need to work our way out of recession. Investing in infrastructure now will help to create jobs across the economy and limit the fallout from coronavirus. And it will stop the devastation of mass unemployment.”

Young people were picked out as those needing urgent support given those aged 25 and under are three times more likely to work in the sectors at greatest risk such as accommodation and food, arts, entertainment and recreation. 

The TUC therefore called on government to set up a national recovery council with unions and employers and introduce a fully fund jobs guarantee programmes that offers paid jobs with training for young people.

It also recommended boosting social security support for those who lose their jobs and setting up sectoral working groups with unions and business groups to draw up road maps for specific industries. 

This, the TUC said, would make sure the crisis didn’t widen existing labour market inequalities.

NYA Toolkit & Covid-19 IAG
June 26, 2020
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The National Youth Agency (NYA) as the Professional Statutory and Regulatory Body for youth work in England has, in consultation with Public Health England and the Health and Safety Executive, developed youth sector specific advice and guidance.

The guidance will support local providers, leaders, volunteers and young people to remain safe when engaging in youth sector activities. It is intended to guide the youth sector in opening up services for young people at the right pace and time.

This guidance must be used in conjunction with the readiness framework and your existing safeguarding policies and procedures. It is complementary to government guidance on social distancing, travel and other measures which must be adhered to.

https://nya.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/0877-NYA-Activity-guide-COVID-19-final_17_06_20-1.pdf

https://nya.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/0877-NYA-Readiness-Toolkit.pdf

Additional tools and resources to support this guidance can be found here

ESFA Update: 24 June 2020

Latest information and actions from the Education and Skills Funding Agency for academies, schools, colleges, local authorities and further education providers.

Documents

ESFA Update further education: 24 June 2020

ESFA Update academies: 24 June 2020

ESFA Update local authorities: 24 June 2020

Details
Items for further education
InformationSubcontracting Declarations Final Deadline – including nil returns
InformationProviding External Assurance on Subcontracting Controls – Return of Assurance Certificate for 2019 to 2020
Informationsupport for independent learning providers as a result of coronavirus (COVID-19)
Informationchanges to apprenticeship service support videos
Items for academies
Actioncoronavirus (COVID-19) schools fund claim
Reminderdeclare or seek approval for your related party transactions
InformationAcademies Financial Handbook 2020
InformationAcademies budget forecast return 3 year (BFR3Y)
Informationpupil premium allocations for 2020 to 2021
Informationguidance for schools post Reading terrorist attack, 20 June
Items for local authorities
Actioncoronavirus (COVID-19) schools fund claim
Informationschools forum meetings
Informationpupil premium allocations for 2020 to 2021
Informationguidance for schools post Reading terrorist attack, 20 June 2020

Published 24 June 2020

Freedom of Choice to Prevail in post-COVID-19 Work Styles
June 25, 2020
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Employees will want more freedom in where they choose to work following the coronavirus pandemic.

Researchers at Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU) found since the introduction of mandatory remote working, many employees had the chance to exercise more, spend time with family and time to think and reflect.

Almost two thirds (62%) of people said they wanted to work from home more on a regular basis. 

Some respondents discussed wanting to spend the majority of their time at home, or have an equal split between home and office. 

Of those who said they wanted to work from home more often generally, more than a quarter (27%) of them wanted to do so more than one day per week. 

Gemma Dale, lecturer at LJMU and report author, said HR now risked employees leaving if it did not offer more flexible working choices.

Speaking to HR magazine, she said: “There is a potential risk that where this demand to work from home isn’t met and requests are turned down, employees may choose to seek an employer that will allow them more flexibility in their working lives. 

“An economic recession may lead to a depressed job market – so these implications may take some time to be felt, unlike morale and employee engagement which could take an immediate hit.”

Yet Dale said a lack of flexibility in some organisations can create opportunities in others.

She added: “I do however think there is an opportunity for those organisations that do need to recruit now – if they can allow some homeworking on an ongoing basis it can be a talent acquisition opportunity, especially where employees feel that their current employer won’t be supportive.” 

The research recommended that more employers should consider home working to support employee wellbeing, reduce the carbon footprint of commuting, attract and retain talented employees, support the reduction of the gender pay gap and improve productivity. 

The research authors therefore said that where workplaces should help employees set up effective workspaces. 

Many employees noted a lack of hardware such as printers and monitors while working from home, plus using unsuitable desks and chairs given many are sharing spaces with family and using home spaces such as kitchen. 

The study has led to a series of recommendations for HR to prepare for the increase in demand for homeworking.

These included taking feedback from employees about challenges and benefits, determining an overall approach for homeworking and reviewing flexible working and homeworking policies. 

The survey also pointed to practical challenges of the pandemic such as technology, appropriate work spaces, childcare, home-schooling and stress and anxiety. 

Dale added: “We didn’t see a significant amount of people saying they were working longer hours, although there were challenges around establishing boundaries between work and home. This did not however seem to have dissuaded them from doing more homeworking.” 

Yet despite these challenges, many respondents had experienced more flexibility and freedom and wanted to retain it, the report’s authors said. 

The survey ran for three weeks in May and early June and had over 500 responses, generating 3,000 qualitative responses. 

Careers England Newsletter: Issue 152
June 25, 2020
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Latest Careers England News

Covid-19 response update: We’ve been lobbying the government for more careers support to help individuals manage the implications of the recession. In April, Careers England and the Career Development Institute (CDI) in partnership with dmh associates (Deirdre Hughes OBE) conducted an online survey to identify how careers companies and careers professionals in England were responding to the impact of Covid-19 and the social distancing lockdown measures. The main purpose was to investigate how careers companies and practitioners were responding to customer needs and to identify current trends and recommendations to inform public policy. The findings highlight a key question for citizens during and after the pandemic; where do I go for careers support? Download the full paper and recommendations. As part of the Career Development Policy Group, we have put together a plan to maintain employment, productivity and progression post-Covid-19. The paper includes recommendations for the short, medium and long term including funding linked to the national careers strategy. The government has already announced an additional £2m for careers hubs across the country.

We have also signed an open letter to Boris Johnson alongside 200 organisations calling on the government to commit to a new Opportunity Guarantee to: 
– Promote job creation by investing in the jobs that we need for the future
– Double the capacity in services that help people into jobs,
– Provide an education place, apprenticeship, or job for every young person. 
The letter is available to read here.

Please help support us by writing to your MP and sharing via your networks. 

Latest Labour Market Stats: The Learning and Work Institute has pulled together an analysis of the ONS statistics from February – April 2020. It shows that despite the government’s unprecedented measures to protect jobs, the Covid-19 crisis has triggered the sharpest rise in unemployment we have ever seen; going back to 1922. Chief Executive Stephen Evans calls for investment in employment support job creation, and a youth guarantee. Read more.
Task Group Information
Our position paper on employer and community engagement is now available on our website. Please share with your networks in support of of the strong partnerships that take place to enable high quality careers education. Thank you to our task group members for developing the paper.
News from Across the Sector
Bank of England ‘ready to act’ as the economy shrinks record 20% – BBC

Five key considerations for making an apprentice guarantee a reality by Robert Halfon MP – FE News

Coronavirus: child psychologists highlight mental health risk of lockdown – BBC

AoC calls for £3.6bn post-pandemic skills package – FE Week

Government to fund private tutors for English schools – The Guardian

£7 million for vulnerable pupils leaving alternative provision – Gov.uk

Rashford seeks more change after food voucher win – BBC

Apprenticeship starts expected to drop by 50% this September – FE News

Covid-19 affects BAME youth mental health more than white peers – The Guardian
Information, Consultations and Resources

Employability Day 2020: Employability Day is a national campaign coordinated by ERSA, taking place this Friday 26th June. The day is an opportunity for employment support organisations to celebrate their hard work supporting people to enter or progress in employment. It allows organisations to shout about their success and drive understanding across key stakeholders at local, regional and national level. Get involved @ERSA_news #EmpDay20  

What are the prospects for young people joining the labour market now?: The Economics Observatory has pulled together evidence suggesting that young people leaving full-time education in the Covid-19 recession will find it much harder to secure employment and even harder to enter well-paid jobs. Read the review here.Covid-19 resources
The CDI has created a new page on its website to locate reports and research related to career development and the current Covid-19 pandemic.
#SkillsWorldLIVE: Our Executive Director Steve Stewart contributed to episode 21 of the SkillsWorld podcast – ‘careers advice and guidance – is it fit for purpose?’ Listen back here.
Conferences, Events and Training

Careers Summit 2020
Our Careers Summit was due to take place on 5th November. We have decided to postpone it to March 2021 so that we can safely run a physical event, to coincide with National Careers Week. Watch this space for more information.  
ESFA Reveals Covid Financial Support Offer for 16-19 Private Training Providers

Private training providers whose recruitment of 16 to 19 students has been “limited” due to Covid-19 have been offered financial support to ease budget pressures.

From 22nd June 2020, independent learning providers (ILPs) can make a business case to the Education and Skills Funding Agency to prevent clawback of any underperformance they have experienced for this group of learners.

The ESFA said:

“ILPs may be recruiting fewer part-time students than they would normally recruit between March 2020 to July 2020.

“This will impact on the level of funding that these students would usually attract and will result in clawback of funds for 2019 to 2020.

“The ESFA will support ILPs whose recruitment of students, to a 16 to 19 study programme, have been limited due to the lockdown situation and who have faced clawback for under performance.”

For approved cases, the ESFA said it will base the expected delivery in March to July on the previous year’s delivery for students recruited between 1 March 2019 and 31 July 2019, taking up to half of this into account.

In addition, the agency will “add the actual delivery for students recruited between March 2020 and July 2020, up to a maximum of 100 per cent of the 2018 to 2019 funded delivery for March 2019 to July 2019”.

No clawback relief will be possible if the cash delivery in 2019 to 2020 exceeds the cash delivery in 2018 to 2019 for the period from 1 March to 31 July for each year.

The ESFA added that to further support ILPs, they are extending the clawback period to include January 2021 to March 2021.

“The clawback that is planned for July 2020 will be included into the re-profiling, from August 2020 to March 2021. This does not need to be requested and will be shown in the R10 reconciliation statement.

“There may be a small number of exceptions where a risk to ESFA and public funds is identified. In these instances, we cannot delay July 2020 clawback, but we will extend the clawback profile until March 2021.”

The ESFA made clear this funding support is a “one-off” in response to the unexpected disruption caused by the arrival of coronavirus and ILPs should “not expect this to be repeated in future”.

ILPs making a business should also “not seek” support from government’s Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) to furlough staff whose salaries are paid from continuing ESFA or any other public income.

“ILPs submitting a business case must demonstrate they have not received support from the CJRS to furlough staff involved in the continued direct delivery of provision remotely of 16 to 19 study programmes and where possible recruitment of 16 to 19 students between March 2020 to July 2020,” the ESFA said.

“The Department for Education is considering appropriate measures to monitor use of claims from CJRS in order to detect any duplication of public funding and will be considering potential options to recover misused public funding as required.”