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Age Discrimination Biggest Obstacle to Re-entering Employment
February 15, 2019
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Age discrimination is the biggest obstacle preventing people from getting back into employment, according to jobsite Jobrapido reports HR Magazine.

It surveyed 2,027 people in the UK currently not in education, employment or training and who had previously worked in management, executive, administrative or manual labour positions.

The research found that almost a quarter of respondents (24%) believe the biggest obstacle to getting a new job is their age and that the role they apply for is given to a younger candidate. Other obstacles included not being able to find a suitable role (11%), that they frequently go to interviews but are rejected (11%), poor health (9%), and not being sure what job they want (6%).

When asked about the challenges securing their job of choice, 32% said the skills needed are very different from when they first started out, 29% said the market is too competitive and the jobs tend to go to people in-house before they’re published externally, and 14% said the development of technology has meant some jobs are now redundant.

Rob Brouwer, CEO of Jobrapido, said that the results reveal age discrimination is still at play in the hiring process. “In spite of the progress of UK employment law and measures to mitigate against the risk of discrimination, it is clear that some companies are not giving candidates a fair playing field,” he said.

“It is disappointing that so many of those trying to get a job believe that age counts against them when their experience should be seen as an asset. HR departments should be scrutinising their equality policies and ensuring that all applicants, regardless of age, are given a detailed breakdown of why they were unsuccessful. Transparency is crucial.”

The research also found that nearly a third (30%) of respondents have lost their confidence and do not feel they can get a job anymore. A further 30% have had to cut back on their spending and change their lifestyle.

Respondents also cited wanting more guidance on the jobs they should apply for. Seventeen per cent would like advice on how to improve their CV, 14% would like better interview feedback so they can learn from their mistakes, and 8% would like advice on how to improve their interview technique or careers counselling to feel more confident.

Brouwer added that, while it is important for candidates to be prepared for interviews, employers could play a stronger role in helping to improve the confidence of those seeking work: “This is a strong call to action for those working in the recruitment industry and to employers and HR professionals to look at ways they could support and help those trying to get employment. This could include running CV workshops, career counselling sessions, a masterclass on interview techniques, how to answer challenging questions, or guidance as to what jobs might be suitable for their existing skills.”

Nearly a third of those surveyed (30%) had been out of work for three to 12 months, 9% for one to two years, 6% for three to five years and 21% for more than five years.

Accelerated Degress Approved by MPs
January 24, 2019
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The following article was published by the Department of Employment on 23rd January 2019

Proposals to increase choice for students and save on tuition fees have been passed by the House of CommonUniversities Minister Chris Skidmore

Students starting university from September 2019 are set to have more choice than ever before about how they study after MPs approved legislation to
support the expansion of two-year and other accelerated degrees.

Legislation was passed in the Commons last night, following proposals from the Department for Education, which means students studying shorter university courses – such as three-year courses condensed into two – would save 20 per cent on tuition fees compared to traditional courses. For example, students who opt for a two-year degree will save at least £5,500 in total tuition costs compared to a standard three-year course. The regulations will now go to the House of Lords for approval.

 

In addition to a saving on tuition fees, students will also benefit from a year without paying any maintenance costs through an accelerated course, which would allow them to access the workforce quicker

Read more

Apprenticeships Vital to Tackling Future of Work Challenges
December 3, 2018
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The following article was published in HR Magazine

Over three-quarters (78%) of businesses strongly believe that ‘earn-and-learn training’ can help address future workplace challenges, according to The 5% Club

Employer-members of The 5% Club were asked for their opinion on a number of challenges facing their sector and the role of apprenticeships and other earn-and-learn training.

All businesses surveyed agreed that on-the-job training can help companies prepare for the future by providing relevant skills, with 78% strongly agreeing. A majority (91%) said that earn-and-learn training could significantly help to address ongoing skills gaps.

A further 67% stated that earn-and-learn training, such as apprenticeships, is critical for upskilling an ageing workforce.

Penny Cobham, director general of The 5% Club, said that growth in AI, combined with an ageing population, spelled significant challenges for businesses.

“Over the next few years businesses will face unprecedented change. The increasing use of artificial intelligence data insight and other technological advances will become the expected norm for businesses in order to thrive and as such, we need to prepare our workforces accordingly,” she said. Read more

Employers Must Provide Flexibility to Support Ageing Workforce
November 20, 2018
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The following article by Rachel Muller-Heyndyk, was published in HR Magazine

The government has called on employers to make accommodations for older employees, with research revealing support for more flexible and part-time role

The research, commissioned from Saga Populus, found that when asked what measures employers should implement to make workplaces more welcoming, respondents most commonly cited offering part-time roles (73%). Additionally more than three in five (63%) suggested that employers need to get better at offering training and retraining schemes to help older workers with upskilling and new technology.

More than three-fifths (65%) felt that an ageing and diverse society is a positive thing that should be celebrated.

However, they were mindful of some of the challenges this also presents. For example, nearly nine in 10 (87%) over-50s were aware that health and social care services need to be redesigned to support an ageing population. They believed the cost of this must be borne across all generations, with three-quarters (75%) stating the need for people of all ages to take increased responsibility for planning and preparing financially for living longer.

The research was commissioned as part of the government’s Ageing Society Grand Challenge, which is calling for businesses to promote the benefits of hiring older workers and to recognise that flexible working arrangements are key. As part of the strategy, the government is investing £300 million to develop technologies to support the ageing workforce.

Patrick Thomson, senior programme manager at the Centre for Ageing Better, said that flexible working could allow older workers time for care responsibilities and personal health needs. Read more

National Retraining Scheme For Adults: £100 Million In The Chancellor’s Budget
October 31, 2018
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The following article was written by Dr Deirdre Hughes OBE

The Chancellors’ Budget (October 2018) allocates £100 million for the first phase of the National Retraining Scheme (NRS).

This will include “a new careers guidance service with expert advice to help people identify work opportunities in their area, and state-of-the-art courses combining online learning with traditional classroom teaching to develop key transferable skills.”

I suspect this will focus on work with adults in the workplace. Lots of questions about how this might fit into the current careers landscape in England?

In 2012, the new all-age National Careers Service originally had a clear agenda to provide universal careers support services deep in local communities and businesses. The budget circa £105m was mostly for adult career guidance. Over the next three years, funding for area-based Prime Contractors working with priority groups is circa £45m.

Read more

Overcoming Barriers to Returning to Work after a Mental-Health Leave
October 18, 2018
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How clients can learn to recognize stressors and develop strategies to better manage them during career change By Mary Ann Baynton

Any transition in life can be stressful. Career transition in particular often happens at the same time as other life stressors, including personal, family, health or financial concerns. Recognizing our current reactions to stress and choosing healthier, more effective responses is what building resilience is all abou

Resilience is the capacity to adapt or recover from stressful situations, including a transition into the workforce or from one job to another. Building resilience doesn’t mean you’ll avoid stress. What it means is that you’ll be able to cope better and recover from stress more effectively.

Research has helped us understand practical strategies to build resilience.

Identifying our stress responses

For most of us, stress is a daily occurrence and our responses to it are automatic. This means we don’t choose or plan them. With that in mind, if we can identify some of our immediate responses to stress, we’re more likely to recognize and address them before they create a major life or health concern.

Some automatic responses can be physical in nature – cold sores, hives, and sweating or stomach problems. Some may be behavioural responses such as reaching for a substance, sleep pattern changes, clumsiness, forgetfulness, impatience, overscheduling or overworking. Emotional responses may also be present and could include irritability, anger, frustration or emotional outbursts. Read more

AI Is A Door To Productivity Gains, But Data Literacy Holds the Key
October 14, 2018
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The report below by Andy Cotgrave (pictured right) for FE News warns of a potential skills shortage and also highlights the growing call for data literacyAndy Cotgreave, Technical Evangelist and Senior Director, Tableau
Productivity is a very British problem. According to the latest figures from the OECD, us Brits are among the hardest workers in Europe, averaging three hours per week more than average across the EU.

When it comes to overall productivity, the amount of meaningful output we achieve during that time, we are 26 percent less effective than the average worker in Germany.

Expert opinion is converging around the idea that technologies including Artificial Intelligence (AI) may hold the keys to solving Britain’s productivity puzzle. The UK government has put investment in AI and data at the core of recently published industrial strategy whitepapers.

As much as this approach seems sensible however, there is a danger that we focus too much on the technology itself and too little on what we actually want to do with it.

Read more

How to Mind the Career Management Gap
October 9, 2018
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The following article is by Natavan Aliyeva is EMEA VP restructuring and career management at LHH Penn

There is a gap between the expectation and the delivery of career management – and we need to close it

According to the LHH Talent Management Survey 83% of organisations expect that offering career development opportunities will grow in importance. No surprise given that 91% of high performers say that working for an employer that offers learning and development opportunities is critical to them. When it comes to Millennials, 87% say career development is an important part of their jobs. And there are significant benefits to providing a career supportive culture, with 78% of businesses that do reporting positive revenue growth – 21% ahead of companies that don’t.

So given that positive set of figures for career development why is that only 23% of HR professionals agree that their career management is effective? Furthermore, 57% of organisations report that managers are simply not conducting regular career conversations with employees. It’s clear that there is a wide career management gap between the value placed upon discussing and developing an employee’s future path and the actual implementation of such vitally-important programmes. Those who do close that gap clearly see a lift in profitability, engagement, and retention – so what’s holding others back from achieving this goal?

We believe there are five key trends holding back successful career management. Read more

What Lies Ahead for Careers Guidance, With Funding Cuts
September 25, 2018
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The following article by Dr Deirdre Hughes OBE, Director, DMH & Associates Ltd,, was published in FE News.

In late 2017, the Board of Careers Yorkshire and the Humber: National Careers Service commissioned dmh associates to undertake an economic review and analysis of the productivity and economic benefits of the service,Productivity and the Economic Benefits: National Careers Service – Careers Yorkshire and the HumberDr Deirdre Hughes OBE, Director, DMH & Associates Ltd

The period under review focuses on data available from early 2015 – mid year 2017 and the primary focus is on face-to-face careers guidance for adults.

Three key questions that were asked:

  1. What level of fiscal return does the National Careers Service: Careers Yorkshire and the Humber make to HM Treasury?
  2. Is the National Careers Service priority target group, set by the Education & Skills Funding Agency (ESFA), linked to a payment by results, sufficient to meet regional/local needs?
  3. What lies ahead in Yorkshire and the Humber when it comes to the National Careers Service face-to-face careers guidance work with adults in the coming year(s)?
Level of fiscal return

For every £1 invested in the National Careers Service: Careers Yorkshire and the Humber £9 is returned in fiscal benefits to the Treasury and the wider economy. The service paid for itself in less than 2 months. This would imply the service has already paid for itself 4 times over halfway through this fiscal year. Read more

11 Words of Careers Advice from Richard Branson’s Mum
September 19, 2018
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The following article is by Melanie Curtin,  writer and activist whose work has been featured in the Huffington Post, the New York Observer and on the Today Show in Australia. She holds a master’s in communication from Stanford University.

Richard Branson is a force of nature.
In addition to being an actual knight, he is the founder of the Virgin Group, which now controls more than 400 companies. His net worth is $5 billion, which puts him seventh on a list of the wealthiest British billionaires. Plus, he’s known for being a compassionate boss and an icon of entrepreneurship.
He wasn’t always that successful, though.

As a boy, he struggled with dyslexia. In a blog on the subject, he wrote a letter to his younger self, saying:

“I know you’re struggling at school and I wanted to give you some advice on how to become the best you can be, even when it’s difficult and you feel like the world is against you. You should never see being different as a flaw or think that something is wrong with you. Being different is your biggest asset and will help you succeed.”

Embrace his difference he did. As a teenager, he named his company “Virgin” because he lacked real experience in business.He’s not a virgin anymore.But no one is an island (even if they own a private one). The fact is, the mentors and influences we have growing up have a profound influence on who we become. And Richard Branson had a major advantage in that department: his mother, Eve.Eve Branson was just as much of a force of nature as little Ricky.

For example, once, on the way home from a shopping trip, Branson’s mother left him alone in the countryside. She gave him basic instructions on how to find his own way home, then left.He was 5 years old. In his words:

“[It was] about three miles through the countryside [to get home]…. She was punishing me for causing mischief in the back seat, but she was also teaching me a larger lesson about overcoming my disabling shyness and learning to ask others for directions.”

Read more

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