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Skills on the Move
November 5, 2018
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The following blog was shared by DMH Associates. 

Migration has been at the centre of political debate across the OECD in recent years. Drawing on data from the OECD Survey of Adult Skills (PIAAC), this report provides new evidence on differences in migrants’ characteristics and contexts and considers how these relate to the skills migrants possess.

It also examines the relationship between migrants’ skills and their labour and non-labour market outcomes in host countries. Finally, it sheds new light on how migrants’ skills are developed, used and valued in host country labour markets and societies. Results and lessons gleaned from analysis highlight the way forward for future research on this topic.

The report represents an invaluable resource for policy makers across different sectors as they design and implement strategies aimed at promoting the long-term integration of foreign-born populations in the economic and social life of their countries. The analyses presented allow us to identify the skill composition of foreign-born populations, the labour market and broader social outcomes associated with such skills, and the factors that can promote skill acquisition and skill use. Read more

Employing People with Autism Spectrum Condition
September 18, 2018
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Remploy’s Vocational Rehabilitation Consultant, Harry McPhillimy talks about supporting employees with Autism Spectrum Condition. Read his blog below.

Autism, Asperger Syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disorder are all terms used to describe a particular neurodiverse spectrum of associated traits.

Remploy

The term Autism Spectrum Condition (ASC), better reflects the range of strengths and challenges associated with this. There is a saying that when you have met one person with autism, you have met one person with autism. There is such variation in how different people experience it. Nevertheless, we know it is associated with difficulties in social communication and interaction, restricted areas of interest, difficulty managing change and sensory sensitivities. It can encompass attention to detail, great subject knowledge and problem-solving skills.

However, medical knowledge is not necessary to support your employees with ASC. In fact, the most important information to know is how the individual is impacted at work to help them achieve their maximum capability and the support of a specialist advisor can be the key to enabling this.

Sometimes organisations find out they have recruited someone with ASC after they have been taken on. In fact, I have supported employees who had not even recognised their own ASC traits until their child had received that diagnosis and they realised they themselves shared many of those traits. This then helped to make sense of their previous struggles and gave them a model they could use for dealing with issues at work, and home. Read more

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