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University? Traineeship? First Job? What’s Your Post-Exam Plan?

The following is a news story published by the Department for Work and Pensions.

Opportunities to gain an extra qualification, go to university, get on-the-job experience or start your career if you’ve just finished your exams.

Whether you are looking to gain an extra qualification, go to university, get on-the-job experience or start your career, there are lots of exciting opportunities for your future. Find out more here.

On the Job Experience

Prepare for the world of work with a traineeship

Traineeships are available for 16 to 24 year olds and are an opportunity for you to gain real work experience, acquire new job skills and improve your English and maths, if you need to. They can last up to 6 months and can be tailored to help you get ready for a job or apprenticeship.

Find a traineeship online.

Earn while you learn with an apprenticeship

Apprenticeships provide hands-on experience, a salary and a chance to train while you work.

Find out what you need to do to become an apprentice, what careers are available and what employers are offering them.

Further and Higher Education

Further education

You can continue your studies after secondary school through a range of further education courses, available in different subjects at different levels – ranging from basic English and maths to Higher National Diplomas. Further education also includes technical and applied qualifications, which will provide you with skills and training to specialise in a specific technical job.

Search for further education courses.

T Levels are new courses coming in September 2020

T Levels are brand new, 2-year courses designed with employers that will be equivalent to 3 A Levels. As the next step after GCSEs, they combine classroom theory, practical learning and a 3-month industry placement to give young people the technical skills, knowledge and experience needed to get a job in a skilled profession.

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Continue your studies in higher education

You can find and apply for most higher education courses online. If you don’t get a place on your chosen university course you can apply for other courses through Clearing.

Find out which courses have vacancies through UCAS from mid-August to late September.

Career Opportunities

Find a job with our careers portal

There are a range of great jobs available online, and we can help you find one through our dedicated jobs website.

Visit Find a Job to search based on location, sector, salary and more to find your perfect fit.

Learn about different careers through My Way In

My Way In shares stories and advice from people in work and employers in a range of different fields. You’ll find tips to help you broaden your experience and the number of jobs you have access to as well as information about the industries which are likely to have vacancies in the future.

Visit My Way In to find out more about jobs in sectors you may not know about.

Visit My Way In in Welsh.

Support vulnerable adults with a career in adult social care

Adult social care attracts all kinds of people with one thing in common – a desire to help make a difference every day. If you’re the sort of person who treats others with respect, listens to their needs, understands their emotions, and is warm, kind and honest, then social care could be the career for you.

Check out our Every Day Is Different page to learn more about a career in adult social care.

Discover a career in STEM

The government is working across industry and engineering institutions to support initiatives across the UK to give young people an inspiring first-hand experience of engineering.

Find more resources on the Engineering – Take a Closer Look campaign website.

Embark on a rewarding career in the public sector

There are a host of rewarding jobs in the public sector that you can get involved in. From teaching to nursing – the public sector is looking for people like you.

For more information please visit the following websites:
NHS jobs
Get Into Teaching
Royal Navy
British Army
Royal Air Force
Prison Officer Jobs
Civil Service Jobs

Get careers advice and inspiration

Need further advice on what to do next? Our career services provide free and impartial careers information, advice and guidance.

In England, visit the National Careers Service

In Scotland, visit Skills Development Scotland – My World of Work

In Wales, visit Careers Wales

In Northern Ireland, visit Careers Service Northern Ireland.

Volunteering

Volunteering is a great way to meet new people, gain skills and experience, and contribute to your community. There are lots of ways to get involved.

Visit Do-it.org, a database of UK volunteering opportunities. You can search more than a million volunteering opportunities by interest, activity or location and then apply online.

Learn new things and take part in the National Citizen Service (NCS)

NCS is a life-changing programme open to all teenagers aged 15 to 17 in England and Northern Ireland to discover who they are and what they can do. If you want to boost your UCAS statement or CV, meet incredible people, get your voice heard and have a lot of fun while you’re at it, then NCS is for you.

Find out more information about NCS.

Apprenticeship v University: What Course to Take?

Remember that moment when the school careers adviser leant over the desk and asked: “So what are you planning to do next?” 

It’s a daunting decision when you’re 17. 

A university degree costs tens of thousands of pounds, although the evidence suggests it can boost your earning potential later. 

On the other hand, an apprenticeship lets you earn as you learn, but life gets serious pretty fast. 

Apprenticeships are shaking off a reputation for low-paid drudgery and there are more higher-level apprenticeships coming on stream. But competition for the best opportunities is as fierce as it is for the top university places.

So if you’re leaving school, does it make sense to aim for one of those coveted places? Or are you missing out if you don’t go for the campus experience? Recent apprentices and graduates have shared their experiences with us.

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‘School was very anti-apprenticeship’

When Matt Carpenter left school at 17, a lot of his classmates were aiming for university. He could have joined them.

“I was the only person in my class who didn’t go,” he says. 

Matt Carpenter (r) and fellow Merchant Navy apprentices at sea
At 21 Matt Carpenter (r) is already qualified to drive ships and tankers

Instead, he took up a three-year apprenticeship with the Merchant Navy, spending half his time at college and half his time at sea on oil and gas tankers, passenger ships and bulk carriers.

“School was very, very anti-apprenticeship – even when I had the place, they were very against it. Up until the last day, they were still asking, ‘Do you really want to do this?'” 

For him, the choice was clear: no student debt and pay of £175 a week. Now, at 21, he’s on an annual salary of £37,000 tax-free and qualified to drive the world’s largest ships.

He admits the social life didn’t compare to what his friends were up to, though. “When you’re at sea, you’re quite cut off. There’s no internet. You’re working every day.”

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‘It made me who I am’

Amy De Friend, 25, did a degree in fashion promotion and communication. She now works in recruitment, but doesn’t regret her decision to study first.

“I went to university, because at the time I didn’t know what I wanted to do.” Amy started her degree the first year that fees went up from £3,000 a year to £9,250.

“My parents said: ‘Do you really want to spend £9,000 on this?'”

And at the end of the three years, she discovered that to get into the fashion industry, she would still have to take unpaid internships. So she worked for Carphone Warehouse instead.

Amy De Friend
Amy De Friend says one of the new experiences she gained through university was learning to scuba dive

Amy accepts she could probably have got the recruitment job she’s in now without a degree.

“I wouldn’t say it was a waste of time,” she says. “The experience I had was fantastic, it helped me develop as a person.”

At university, Amy joined a diving club and qualified as an instructor, something she wouldn’t otherwise have tried.

“I don’t think it’s all about getting a job. It’s about what you gain from the experience. It made me who I am.”

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‘I was itching to start work’

Nick Martin, 20, has just been head-hunted for a £22,500-a-year job in sales. He puts that down to his work experience as an apprentice with a telephone networking equipment company.

“Before I got my last job, I went through a lot of interviews. Every single agency and company loved the fact I had done an apprenticeship, because it shows you know what it’s like in a fast-paced office environment.”

Nick Martin cycling
Nick decided he could pursue his ambitions as a semi-pro cyclist alongside an apprenticeship just as easily as through a university team

At 17, Nick was “just itching to get into work”.

The apprenticeship scheme he joined was new and he felt he was a “guinea pig”, often left to get on with things unsupervised, which meant a lot of responsibility very quickly. 

“By the time most people my age come out of uni, I’ll have had three to five years’ experience. On the flipside, I haven’t spent that time getting the extra qualifications.”

“At the time, I didn’t have doubts. Now, to be honest, I think about it a bit more. The main reason for that is a bit of ‘Fomo’ – fear of missing out – missing out on the social aspect of being at uni. You get to live in halls or housing with flatmates. I’m still living at home.”

Then there’s the snobbery. “I still get that feeling from some people – people I know who are at uni who think they’re better – there can be a smugness. But there’s nothing guaranteed. They’ll have a degree, but they’ll still have to find a job, which is hard.”

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‘To learn about something I loved was brilliant’

Jenny Willbourn, 29, joined engineering firm Atkins after gaining undergraduate and post-graduate degrees in geography. The firm has a well-established apprenticeship programme, but she says that wouldn’t have been the right route for her.

“I believe there’s something valuable in academic study – the opportunity to understand a particular area of knowledge.”

Jenny Willbourn at her desk
Jenny Willbourn joined Atkins after studying for five years at university

“To push your communication skills is one thing, but to critically evaluate – that’s a skill that university teaches. I value that as second to none.”

She works in a highly specialised team at Atkins looking at spatial data, including mapping the locations of badgers and bats as part of the HS2 planning process.

“I needed a degree to tell me what the options were and give me the skills I now have. For me, the ability to hone my skills at an academic level was very important.”

But above all, she enjoyed the experience: “To learn about something I loved was brilliant.”

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‘I feel really proud of myself’

Joy Shepheard-Walwyn, 19, had a place at Durham University to study philosophy and Russian. She rejected it in favour of a management consultancy apprenticeship with accountancy firm PwC.

Moving to Leeds on her own just a few days after her 18th birthday was nerve-racking, she says. But PwC has helped provide a community for her in and out of work. She’s joined the firm’s netball team and teaches English to refugees. She loves the work, managing change in the public sector, adult social care, local government and schools.

“I feel really proud of myself in terms of what I’ve achieved.”

Joy Shepheard-Walwyn
Joy Shepheard-Walwyn turned down a university place to take up a PwC apprenticeship

She thinks university can be about putting off adult life a little longer. “My friends are out partying a lot, but I’m earning a salary.” 

“I don’t feel I missed out. I just went it about it a different way.” 

By Lucy HookerBusiness reporter, BBC News

The Role Of Assessment In Guided Career Intervention

Exploring why career practitioners use assessments, as well as how they can select the appropriate tools and effectively interpret client results

By: JoAnn Harris-Bowlsbey

Assessment has played an important role in career guidance since its beginning in the early 20th century. According to the Joint Committee on the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing of the AERA, APA and NCME (Joint Committee on Testing Practices, 2004), the definition of assessment is “Any systematic method of obtaining information from tests and other sources, used to draw inferences about characteristics of people, objects, or programs.” This article uses the term “career guidance” to refer to interventions with young people and adults related to educational and vocational choices. The purpose of the article is to review with career development facilitators and counsellors the purposes, options and guidelines for use of assessment in career guidance and counselling.

Purposes of assessment

It is possible to view the plethora of assessment instruments available in our field in three categories: a) those that support career exploration, b) those that identify career development needs, and c) those that measure accomplishment in areas related to educational or career development goals. Let’s look at each of those separately.

The purpose of the first segment of assessments available in our field is to help individuals find focus for exploration. This segment includes inventories of interests, skills, work-related values and personality characteristics. The number of occupational options is vast, with 974 groups of occupations defined in O*NET (the National Occupational Classification [NOC] system categorizes jobs in Canada), each of which can be broken down into many more defined occupations. The National Career Cluster Framework (Advance CTE, 2019) defines 16 industry-related clusters, which can be divided into 79 groups called pathways.

To find focus for exploration

The Holland classification system (Holland, 1997) defines six work environments, under which hundreds of occupations are categorized by educational levels in the Dictionary of HollandOccupational Codes (Goddfredson & Holland, 1996). It is impossible for individuals seeking to choose an occupation to learn about all of these options. Thus, one very valuable use of assessment inventories is to find focus for exploration.

ACT’s World-of-Work Map (Prediger, 1981) arranges hundreds of occupations by Holland work environments and 26 Career Areas. There are assessments whose results direct individuals’ focus to options in each of these four organizational schemes, allowing them to identify groups of occupations that align with their interests, skills, values and/or personality traits. Career explorers can then identify specific occupations they are interested in and “reality test” (using Donald Super’s term) this manageable set by reading, job shadowing, course work, etc.

To identify career decision-making and development needs

Though it sounds easy to administer an interest inventory, interpret it and shepherd career decision-makers through exploratory interventions, a significant proportion of career explorers have intrapersonal challenges that need to be removed before they are able to follow a logical process to a well-informed choice. Theorists define these barriers differently. Super (1957) describes a poor self-concept or the lack of completing specific development tasks as barriers. Krumboltz (1991) focuses on negative career beliefs. Sampson and his colleagues (1996) refer to negative career thoughts. Dinklage (1968) emphasizes ineffective decision-making styles.

The assessment tools in this category measure such intrapersonal challenges. The results may be used to work with individuals on specific identified problems or, for example, to assign members of a career planning course to different levels and kinds of intervention.

To measure progress in desired learning or attitudes

Similarly, such assessments may be used for research or for program evaluation. For example, a measure of career decidedness may be administered to two matched groups: one that has not had a course in career planning and one that has had such a course. The hypothesis is that the group that has completed the career-planning course will have a higher mean score on career decidedness than the group that did not have the course. Such an assessment could also be used with one group prior to taking the career-planning course and again afterward. The goal in this case would be to measure change in specific career attitudes or behaviours triggered by the content of the course.

Assessments of this kind can also be used to measure the attainment of skills, such as behavioural skills or academic skills. After individuals receive training and retake such tests, an increase in these skills can be measured. Similarly, students’ achievement toward mastering specific standards or goals can be measured by instruments in this category.

Types of assessments

Assessment tools in our field are typically divided into two categories: formal and informal. Formal assessments have these characteristics: a) their content, specific items, scoring algorithms and score reports are developed with scientific rigour; b) this fact results in the publisher being able to state their reliability and validity; and c) the combination of the first two makes it possible to compare the score of an individual to that of another or with those of a group with a high degree of scientific accuracy.

On the other hand, these characteristics – scientific rigour, known reliability and validity, and capability for comparison with others – are not central to informal assessments. They are tools such as card sorts, checklists, career fantasies, questionnaires and structured interviews. They own a legitimate space in our field and are used skillfully by many counsellors. They cost far less to develop and acquire, and they can be administered with far less advance planning.

Scientific rigour includes the careful completion of tasks such as the following:

  • Clearly defining what is to be measured
  • Clearly defining the component parts of what is being measured
  • Developing items that measure the component parts
  • Testing these items with members of the target population and modifying or replacing those that do not function well
  • Choosing a norm group that mirrors the target population for which the assessment is developed
  • Developing norms for various ages or grade levels
  • Designing score reports that can be readily understood by counsellors and those who took the assessment
Methods of administering assessments

Informal assessments are typically administered by a counsellor or career development facilitator face-to-face in an office or classroom setting. For example, students or clients are asked to sort a set of cards, each of which contains the description of a value, into three stacks: those that “highly appeal to me,” those that are “somewhat appealing” and those that “I’d like to avoid.” In a different setting, a counsellor or career development facilitator may ask students in a career planning class to relax, close their eyes and imagine an ideal day at work – its location, work tasks, co-workers, degree of independence, length, concomitant lifestyle, etc. In yet another approach, a counsellor who has detailed knowledge of Holland’s theory may conduct a structured interview around the six work environments. In each of these cases, a trained counsellor is able to help a student or client draw inferences from the informal assessment that sheds light on potential career choices or changes.

Formal assessments are administered in print or digital forms. If they are standard tests in print form with right or wrong answers, they are administered under controlled conditions usually involving standard instructions, specified time limits, security of testing materials and test monitors. Such tests may also be administered in a computer lab, requiring that individuals prove their identity to access items that are delivered through a secure website. Some achievement or aptitude tests are adaptive, meaning that the computer selects items at increasing levels of difficulty until it finds the examinee’s general level of knowledge and then presents items only at that level. This type of test varies both in items used and in length of testing for different students.

Technology has revolutionized assessment in many ways, offering capabilities such as the following: adaptive testing; the use of videos, graphics and audio; administration to large numbers of people nationwide at their selected time; immediate scoring; online personalized interpretation of results; electronic transfer of results to counsellors; and the ability to easily share results, where appropriate.

Guidelines for selecting assessments

Following are some guidelines that may be helpful when selecting assessments to use with clients or students:

  • Define clearly what you want to measure and why. Possibilities for what you want to measure could include interests, skills, aptitudes, personality traits, values, academic achievement, learning style, decision-making style and self-efficacy, to name a few. Reasons for measuring these might include to design career guidance interventions for individuals or groups of individuals, to define segments of your target population to receive different sets of interventions, to measure the effectiveness of your program, to determine whether students have achieved the goals set forth in a specific set of standards, etc.
  • Develop a list of assessments designed to measure what you want to measure. Using a resource such as NCDA’s publication, A Counselor’s Guide to Career Assessment (Wood & Hays, 2019) will be invaluable. It describes assessments designed for various purposes and the 7th edition uniquely gives you online access to expert reviews in order to make an informed choice.
  • Gather as much information as you can about the assessments you have identified. It is essential for you to determine whether each assessment has been developed and tested with individuals like those in your target population. For each, learn about its reliability, validity and theoretical base. Take the assessment yourself and administer it to a few students/clients. Study its score report to see if it is presented in a language and with graphics that will make it understandable to your population. Talk to or read reviews from counsellors who have used the assessment. Importantly, determine if the results of the assessment are compatible with other components of your program. For example, if your school’s occupational information is organized by Holland work environments, use an interest inventory that provides results by Holland types. Last, but certainly not least, assess the quality of the publisher. This involves the credibility of the author, the professional reputation of the publisher, the training offered to assure that the assessment is administered and interpreted properly, and the quality of customer service provided.
  • Determine its practicality for your setting. This criterion includes how the assessment is administered (print or electronic) and scored, how counsellors can get training, length and requirements of administration, and cost.
Guidelines for interpreting assessment

Here are some guidelines for providing interpretation:

  • Provide interpretation as soon as possible after students or clients have taken an assessment. Begin interpretation by reviewing why the person took the assessment and what it was like (eg, “you responded to 60 items by selecting one of five answers – like very much, like, neutral, dislike, dislike very much”). If true, be sure to indicate that there are no “right” or “wrong” answers.
  • Provide the score report to the examinee and explain each section simply and in detail. If you conduct interpretation in a group, use an attractive PowerPoint presentation with a sample score report that students/clients see while having their own report in front of them.
  • Provide an opportunity to students/clients to ask questions, and try to make sure you answer all questions immediately or within a reasonable timeframe.
  • Be sure that you apply the results on the score report to the specific career concerns that the student or client is facing at the moment. This, of course, is the real reason for having taken the assessment. Its interpretation should be used to guide course selection, the tentative selection of an occupation or job, or whatever career concern the student or client has brought forward or your program of services is attempting to support.
Summary

This article has provided a general overview of the purposes of assessment, types of assessment, methods of administration, and guidelines for selecting and interpreting assessments. Understanding these concepts is just the beginning of preparation for informed use of assessments in career counselling and guidance. In-depth investigation of the effectiveness of specific assessments in various work settings and with members of various populations is essential.

JoAnn Harris-Bowlsbey, EdD(bowlsbeyj@kuder.com) is an international authority in the areas of career development and counselling and a pioneer in the development and use of computer and web-based career planning systems. She has served as a high school director of guidance, university professor, career counsellor, executive director of the ACT Educational Technology Center, vice-president for development at Kuder, Inc., and president of the National Career Development Association. Dr Harris-Bowlsbey is the author of numerous print-based curricular materials, is widely published in academic journals and texts, and has delivered hundreds of workshops to counsellors at conferences and universities around the globe. She is the author of numerous versions of web-based career planning systems, of curricula for training of career development facilitators, and co-author of a leading textbook for the training of master’s level counsellors.

References

Advance CTE. (2019). National career clusters framework. Silver Spring, MD: Author.

Dinklage, L.B. (1968), Decision strategies of adolescents. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Harvard UniversityCambridge, MA.

Goddfredson, G.D. & Holland, J.L. (1996). The dictionary of Holland occupational codes. Odessa, FL. Psychological AssessmenResources.

Holland, J. L. (1997). Making vocational choices: a theory of vocational personalities and work environments (3rd edition). Odessa, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources.

Joint Committee on Testing Practices (2004). Code of fair testing practices. Washington, D.C.: Author.

Krumboltz, J.D. (1991). The Career Beliefs Inventory. Menlo Park, CA: Mind Garden, Inc.

Prediger, D. P. (1981). Aid for mapping occupations and interests: A graphic for vocational guidance and research. Vocational Guidance Quarterly, 30, 21-36.

Sampson, J.P., Petersen, G.W., Lenz, J.G., Reardon, R.C., & Saunders, D.E. (1996). Career Thoughts Inventory. Odessa, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources.

Super, D. E. (1957). The psychology of careers. New York, NY: Harper.

Wood, C. & Hays, D.G. (2019). A counselor’s guide to career assessment instruments. Broken Arrow, OK: National Career Development Association.


60% of Gen Z Know What Career They Want Before They Are 20

New research has identified that over half (53%) of 16-20-year-olds wouldn’t consider a career in hospitality.

The top reasons for this are it’s seen as ‘a stepping stone to another career’, as having ‘limited career prospects’ and viewed as ‘a part-time job while studying’ – posing the question, do hospitality careers need a re-brand?

The results, which are from a new study by HIT Training and Get My First Job, highlight the worrying perceptions the younger generation have of hospitality careers and the need for the sector to address these and open the door to future talent. Read more

Six Celebrities Who Are Former Teachers

Inspiration for your clients? From the stars of Rocky to The A-Team via the writer of Harry Potter, teaching has proven a well-trodden path in the early days of these famous careers.

Here, we look at six celebrities from the world of stage, screen, music and literature who once worked as teachers before going on to follow their own dreams.

Hugh Jackman

After graduating from secondary school, the Greatest Showman and X-Men star spent a gap year in England, working at a boarding school in the East Midlands. Jackman, who excelled at sport at school, spent the majority of his time teaching PE and coaching sports teams. He also tutored students only a few years younger than him in English and Drama. After returning to Australia to attend university in Sydney, he enrolled on a drama course and the rest, as they say, is history!

JK Rowling

After leaving university with a French degree and working in various temporary jobs, JK Rowling followed up on an advert in a national newspaper and found herself teaching English in the Portuguese city of Porto. Here, she was able to moonlight as a writer whilst teaching and drafted the first instalment of Harry Potter.

Laurence Tureaud

Better known as Mr T, Laurence Tureaud had a massively varied career before landing his iconic role as B.A. Baracus in The A-Team. Tureaud enlisted in the US army, tried out for the NFL and had a successful stint as a nightclub bouncer. He was so successful in fact, he moved into the bodyguard business, protecting the likes of Muhammad Ali and Diana Ross. Perhaps he learnt everything he knew during his time as a PE teacher in his native Chicago.

George Orwell

The Animal Farm author (born Eric Blair) taught at the Hawthorns High School in West London whilst waiting for his first full-length work, Down and Out in Paris and London, to be published. Orwell (now his pen name) would go on to teach in Uxbridge, but his teaching career wouldn’t last any longer than that. His most famous work, 1984, contributed to our modern vocabulary with phrases such as ‘Big Brother’, ‘Thought Police’ and ‘Room 101’. Even though he left teaching behind, his literary works still give us plenty to study.

Sheryl Crow

The Grammy award-winning singer-songwriter was a music teacher in her home state of Missouri after graduating from its university. The school day routine was perfect for Crow as she could practise her trade in the evenings and weekends (hopefully leaving enough time for marking her students’ work in-between). After a few well-received commercial jingles, Crow found herself as a backing singer for Michael Jackson before going on to forge an impressive solo career.

Sylvester Stallone

Sly Stallone is one of the most recognisable action/adventure stars in Hollywood. He’s also a successful writer and director, having penned all six Rocky films as well as directing several instalments. Before his stardom, he attended the American College in Switzerland, where he worked as a PE teacher to earn extra money. So, when Stallone’s Rocky took on Mr. T’s Clubber Lang in Rocky III it was a face off between two former teachers!

How Young is Too Young to Begin Preparing for a Career?

The students at Manhattan’s LaGuardia High School, the high school that inspired the movie and TV show Fame, are hoppingWjat s the best age to track students mad.

They staged an hours-long sit-in to protest the role academics plays in their high school. The school’s principal is enforcing academic standards and wants more rigorous requirements, including more emphasis on Advanced Placement classes. The students argue this is not appropriate for a performing arts high school. “We’re not here to be the most perfect mathematicians,” Eryka Anabell, an 18-year-old senior, told the New York Times. “I’m here to discover myself as an artist.”

It is easy to dismiss the students as just wanting to get out of math class. But they do have a point and are making an increasingly common argument: High schools need to prepare students for more than college admissions. LaGuardia aims to teach their students a trade. As student debts mount, many politicians and scholars say we need more vocational education at the high school level that puts less emphasis on college curriculum and more on job skills. Read more

AI Careers Unappealing to UK Workers

Government data finds that many are uninterested in a career in AI as BEIS announces plans to boost technology skill.

Only 39% of people are interested in a career in AI with 59% of those aged under 45, according to research by the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (BEIS) and Kantar Public.

The report, which was released for London Tech Week this week, also found a gender divide over interest in AI jobs. Just 31% of women said they’d be interested compared to 47% of men.

More than 60% of people were excited to see what AI can do, however, and awareness levels of AI in everyday life were found to be more than 60%. Read more

Top Tips for Inspiring Young People to Choose Engineering as a Career

EngineeringUK has released a new free guide to help STEM professionals and ambassadors to deliver exciting and varied activities to help encourage young people to consider engineering as a career choice

Getting the message across is a top tips guide for anyone who provides engineering outreach activities in schools.

It encourages STEM professionals and ambassadors to plan inspiring and impactful activities by providing real-world examples of engineering matched to what students might be learning in the classroom.

Engineering cuts across all life from addressing some of society’s pressing challenges like climate change to building and designing new technology like mobile phones or apps for improving health and wellbeing.

The guide suggests that making links between the skills involved in the subjects young people study – such as maths, science, D&T, computing, geography, art and languages – and exciting job roles in engineering can really help students realise the value of these subjects for the future and switch them on to the idea of a career in engineering. Read more

Youth Voice Census Results 2019 : Press Release

Careers education and knowledge of apprenticeships is on the rise, but there is still much work to do to fix youth unemployment

Youth Employment UK has today launched the results from the 2019 Youth Voice Census, a survey capturing the experiences of more than 3,000 14-24-year olds as they transition between education and employment. Download the full Youth Voice Census Report for 2019 (PDF)

Young People And Careers Education

Young people are benefitting from developments in careers education policy and knowledge of apprenticeships is on the rise; 83% of respondents reported that they had had apprenticeships discussed with them whilst in secondary school, up from 58% in 2018. However university remains the option most frequently discussed, and young people’s confidence in pursuing an apprenticeship has some way to go before we see real parity. It is encouraging to see that those young people who do undertake an apprenticeship report high satisfaction levels. More than 83% say that their apprenticeship has prepared them for their next step, with 63% of respondents planning to stay with their current employer.

Careers Education And The Gender Divide Read more

More Than a Job’s Worth Report

LKMco has launched an important new report, which sets out what young people should learn during their careers education, and when.https://gallery.mailchimp.com/f6c6cb516a23622646159c4f0/images/63d797d4-5653-4856-b03d-58189ff63f79.png

More Than A Job’s Worth: Making Careers Education Age-Appropriate was commissioned by the charity Founders4Schools, and argues that children’s careers education should begin as soon as they start school. While this is something that may make some people squeamish, the report sets out how this can be done in an age-appropriate way

Read The Report Here