Avatar
Hello
Guest
Log In or Sign Up
Major Expansion of Post-18 Education and Training
September 30, 2020
0

From: Prime Minister’s Office, 10 Downing Street and The Rt Hon Boris Johnson MP

The Prime Minister has set out plans to transform the training and skills system, making it fit for the 21st century economy, and helping the country build back better from coronavirus.

Adults without an A-Level or equivalent qualification will be offered a free, fully-funded college course – providing them with skills valued by employers, and the opportunity to study at a time and location that suits them.

This offer will be available from April in England, and will be paid for through the National Skills Fund. A full list of available courses will be set out shortly.

Higher education loans will also be made more flexible, allowing adults and young people to space out their study across their lifetimes, take more high-quality vocational courses in further education colleges and universities, and to support people to retrain for jobs of the future.

These reforms will be backed by continued investment in college buildings and facilities – including over £1.5 billion in capital funding. More details will be set out in a further education white paper later this year.

The coronavirus pandemic and changing economy is why the Prime Minister is developing a long-term plan to ensure that, as work changes, people can retrain, upskill and find new well-paid jobs.

In a speech on Tuesday, the Prime Minister is expected to announce a new Lifetime Skill Guarantee. He will say:

As the Chancellor has said, we cannot, alas, save every job. What we can do is give people the skills to find and create new and better jobs.

So my message today is that at every stage of your life, this government will help you get the skills you need.

He will add:

We’re transforming the foundations of the skills system so that everyone has the chance to train and retrain.

Apprenticeship opportunities will also be increased, with more funding for SMEs taking on apprentices, and greater flexibility in how their training is structured – especially in sectors such as construction and creative industries where there are more varied employment patterns.

In 2000, over 100,000 people were doing Higher National Certificates and Diplomas, but that has reduced to fewer than 35,000 now. Those doing foundation degrees has declined from 81,000 to 30,000.

As a result, only 10% of adults hold a Higher Technical Qualification as their highest qualification, compared to 20% in Germany and 34% in Canada.

This is despite the fact that five years after completion, the average Higher Technical Apprentice earns more than the average graduate.

That is why the government is committed to making higher education more flexible to facilitate lifelong learning, and to make it easy for adults and young people to break up their study into segments, transfer credits between colleges and universities, and enable more part-time study.

This new arrangement will provide finance for shorter term studies, rather than having to study in one three or four year block.

The government is also committing £8 million for digital skills boot camps; expanding successful pilots in Greater Manchester and the West Midlands and introducing programmes in four new locations.

From next year, boot camps will be extended to sectors like construction and engineering, helping the country build back better and support our refreshed Industrial Strategy.

Earlier this year the government launched its free online Skills Toolkit, helping people train in digital and numeracy skills. This is being expanded today to include 62 additional courses.

£2.5 billion is also being made available through the National Skills Fund to help get people working again after COVID, as well as giving those in work the chance to train for higher-skilled, better-paid jobs.

Andy Wales, Chief Digital Impact and Sustainability Officer, BT, said:

BT welcomes the Prime Minister’s commitment to put skills at the heart of the COVID-19 recovery plan, and particularly the emphasis on digital skills. BT is already heavily invested in this area through Skills for Tomorrow which aims to empower 10 million people by giving them the skills they need to make the most of life in a digital world. Our Work Ready programme, and our support for the new Fast Futures digital courses for young adults, focus on the jobseeker groups that most need new skills. Ensuring that the nation’s workforce is ready for a digital future has never been more urgent – and partnership is key. That’s why BT is a founding partner of FutureDotNow, a coalition which aims to motivate people and businesses across the UK to address the growing skills gap and empower everyone to thrive in a digital UK.

Doug Gurr, Amazon’s U.K. Country Manager, said:

We welcome this initiative to help the country recover from the impact of the pandemic by equipping people with the skills needed to find new jobs and retrain for new opportunities. At Amazon, we continue to provide opportunities for people of all ages to gain new skills with apprenticeships and university bursaries, free computer science and engineering resources through our Amazon Future Engineer and Maths4All programmes, and free training for small businesses through the Amazon Small Business Accelerator. Amazon also offers employees a programme called Career Choice that provides funding for skills development through nationally recognised courses of up to £8,000 over four years.

Stephen van Rooyen, EVP & CEO, UK and Europeat Sky said:

Given the pace of change in business and in workplaces today, and the economic challenges of COVID, we welcome the Prime Minister’s announcements today to not just rebuild, but to turbo charge skills training in England. The new Skills and Productivity Board has a key role to play in developing our skills economy for current and future generations. It is a privilege to contribute, and I’m looking forward to working with the panel and the government to drive this important agenda. The Skills Productivity Board will provide important advice to government on how to tackle the nation’s skills challenges to help rebuild our economy post-COVID-19 and deliver the bold skills agenda outlined by the Prime Minister today. I look forward to working with government to level up opportunity across the country ensuring people have the skills they need to progress.

Clare Barclay, CEO, Microsoft UK, said:

As a country we face multiple challenges, but we believe that learning unlocks opportunity. Today, more than ever, individuals, businesses and government must build the skills we need for tomorrow. Because if we fail to act now, the UK could easily be left behind in the global economy. There are no better investments in our future than the kinds of accessible, lifelong and flexible programmes that the Prime Minister has announced this morning.

Charles Woodburn, Chief Executive, BAE Systems, said:

It’s more important than ever that government and industry work together to help young people and adults gain the skills needed to work in sectors which will support our nation’s economic recovery. As a major employer of graduates and apprentices, BAE Systems’ investment in skills provides an essential pipeline of talent that enables us to continue to deliver cutting-edge defence and security capabilities, essential to our national security.

Nick Mackenzie, CEO Greene King, said:

We welcome the Prime Minister’s announcement of increased funding for skills and further education. As a business we are passionate about improving social mobility and developing the skills of the nation’s young people to ensure they are ready for work. That is why we invest heavily in apprenticeships, supporting over 12,500 since 2011.

David Livingstone, CEO for Europe, Middle East and Africa at Citi, said:

With digitisation accelerating throughout the economy, the UK needs to continue to develop a highly skilled and innovative workforce. Banks can play a critical role, and Citi looks forward to expanding the reach of its current apprenticeship programmes, including our recently-launched Data Academy and efforts to encourage former employees back into the workforce. Citi stands ready to play its part in delivering on the UK Government’s ambition to increase employability and transform the country’s training and skills system.

Anthony Impey MBE, Founder, Optimity, said:

The Prime Minister’s announcement today to transform the training and skills system is crucial to helping businesses get back on their feet and start to realise future opportunities. These are tough times for small businesses and skills are a vital part of the recovery process.

Steve Murrells, CEO of the Co-op, said:

The Co-op Group is pleased to work in partnership with the government to create opportunities for adults to gain the skills they need to move into sustainable employment. We are already an industry leader in providing apprenticeships and we are proud of the work our 1,200 current apprentices have done as key workers during the pandemic to support the nation.

We believe that opportunities need to be created where they are most needed and offered to those who most need them. So we have already committed to ensure that groups that have previously been under-represented in our apprenticeship programme receive fair access in the future so we are seeking partnerships focussed on benefitting Black, Asian and ethnic minority candidates. We also know there is more to do to ensure opportunities to develop new skills are made available in the communities that most need them. That’s why we have committed to offer up to 150 kickstarter placements – combining skills and paid employment – in communities where we know the need is greatest.

A Jaguar Land Rover spokesperson said:

We welcome today’s announcement by the Prime Minister. As future technologies increase the need for digital and electrical skills in the automotive industry, Jaguar Land Rover supports any measures aimed at up-skilling and re-skilling our employees as a part of a lifelong approach to learning.

As the largest UK automotive apprenticeship provider, we invest heavily in the training and development of our people throughout their careers. We look forward now to working with government and industry to develop fit for purpose technical courses and qualifications to support future high value job creation and maintain the UK’s global manufacturing competitiveness.

Ofsted Seeks to Make Oversight of Subcontractors More Comprehensive and Transparent

Ofsted has published new research looking at subcontractors in the further education and skills sector.

New research by Ofsted finds that subcontractors in the further education and skills (FES) sector often have overall control of the day-to-day quality of a learner’s education and training. However, directly-funded providers do not always exert enough influence to manage the subcontracted provision well. For example, they might not have the necessary subject or industry expertise to review provision meaningfully.

The research also found that the current approach to inspection means that some subcontractors are visited more than once, while others are not visited at all.

While Ofsted is not funded to directly inspect subcontractors, the research proposes a more comprehensive and transparent approach to improve oversight.

The report, ‘Subcontracting in further education and skills’, recognises the acute economic challenges FES providers are facing as a result of COVID-19, as well as the broader decline in subcontracted provision over recent years. It explores what makes for high-quality FES provision delivered through subcontracting and asks how inspection and regulation might need to adapt as a result of a rapidly evolving landscape.

Ofsted is responsible for inspecting the quality of education offered by directly-funded FES providers, but inspectors do not report on all subcontracted provision. However, the inspectorate has increased its focus on subcontracting over the past 2 years, in response to concerns about the quality of some subcontractors.

Currently, Ofsted inspections give a rounded judgement of a directly- funded provider by sampling activities across the provision. The choice of subcontractors to sample is made within practical constraints, such as their location. These activities then inform the leadership and management judgement of the directly- funded provider and, where appropriate, the quality of education judgement.

The report suggests there are limitations to this approach and concludes that the oversight of subcontracted education could be improved by sampling more subcontracted provision. Therefore, Ofsted is seeking to make inspecting and reporting on subcontracted provision more comprehensive and transparent by:

  • working with the Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA) to improve access to timely and accurate data on the number and size of subcontracting arrangements held by a directly-funded provider
  • increasing awareness among inspectors of Ofsted’s available inspection resource, in order to investigate more subcontractors
  • changing the way evidence is recorded to systematically and consistently include information about all subcontractors visited
  • where appropriate, highlighting more subcontractors in inspection reports

In particular, more accurate data from the ESFA would allow Ofsted to arrange to visit subcontracted provision that was far away, because out-of-region resources could be factored into planning.

Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, Amanda Spielman, said:

The financial stresses of the COVID-19 pandemic and ESFA’s tighter regulations around subcontracting make this an important and timely report. Over the past two years we have increased our focus on the management of subcontracted provision. However, this new research has highlighted the importance of reviewing subcontractors within our current model.

We are open to exploring how we could directly inspect subcontractors in the future, but that would need significantly more financial resource and better data. So, for now we will continue to inspect subcontractors as part of our inspections of directly-funded providers. But I’m confident that the changes set out in today’s report will make our oversight more meaningful and transparent.

The report is based on visits to 14 subcontractors in November and December last year; focus groups with 38 inspectors; and desk-based analysis of inspection reports and evidence bases, as well as other publicly available data on subcontracting.

Student Experience in the Time of COVID-19 – Survey Results
September 10, 2020
0

By Tribal Group, 07-September-2020

The outbreak of COVID-19 in early 2020 was, in modern times, unprecedented. And it required an unprecedented response from education institutions around the world.

Now, over six months on from the emergence of the global pandemic and with many institutions preparing for the start of a new and potentially uncertain academic year, it is useful to gauge how students feel about their institution’s response to COVID-19 to date.

How have institutions performed on communicating key information to their students throughout the event? How successful was the – in most cases, very rapid – transition to online learning?

What should institutions be aware of in terms of student experience as they navigate through the COVID-19 era?

Read more »

Student Loans Company Calls on Students to Get Ready for Payment
September 4, 2020
0

SLC is urging students to get ready for the first Maintenance Loan payment of the new academic year.

In the coming weeks the Student Loans Company will distribute approximately £2 billion in maintenance funding to around 1 million students across the UK – supporting them to access opportunities in higher and further education.

With the new academic year set to start, SLC is urging students to get ready for the first payment by following our top tips.

  1. Register at your college or university – with some universities or colleges, students can register beforehand to receive payments on the first official day of their course. However, students should follow the registration guidance provided by their education provider. Until students register, they won’t receive payment and it can take three to five days for payments to reach a student’s account once they are registered. Students should make sure they have money to cover any initial costs.
  2. Don’t worry if, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, you’re studying online initially – some students will be studying at home instead of in classes. They will still be paid as normal provided they have registered for their course. See tip number 1.
  3. Tell us if your term time living arrangements have changed – If students have changed their plans about where they will live during term time – for example will be living with parents instead of moving away – they must update their application in their online account. This also applies to students who were planning to be studying abroad but will now be learning online. Failing to do this could result in overpayments. Students will have to repay any funding that is overpaid, and it could affect funding in future years.
  4. Check with your provider to make sure your course start date hasn’t changed – Your Maintenance Loan payment is based on your course start date so if that changes your first payment date will change too. If in doubt check with your university or college.
  5. Make sure you have provided up-to-date bank details – often when a student goes to university or college they open a new bank account. It’s important that they update their online student finance account with the new details to ensure their money goes to the right place.
  6. Provide any evidence you have been asked for as soon as possible – parents and partners may also be asked to provide financial information and evidence. They should do this through their own online student finance account which they can set up at www.gov.uk/studentfinance. Most evidence can be uploaded online via SLC’s new digital upload service which can also be accessed via their online student finance account.
  7. Check the status of your payments. Students can view their payment schedule and check the status of their payments via their online accounts. Student Finance England has produced a handy film explaining what each of the payment statuses mean.
  8. Tell us if your parent, carer or partner’s income has changed. If a student applied for a Maintenance Loan based on their household income, they would have been asked to provide details for the 2018-19 tax year. If their annual household income has dropped by more than 15% they can apply to have their estimated income for the current tax year used instead. Find out more about supporting your child or partner’s application.
  9. Let us know as soon as possible if you plan to suspend or withdraw from your studies. If a student is planning to leave or suspend their course it’s important that they consider the impact on their funding needs. They should talk to their university or college and let SLC know of any changes as soon as possible. Find out more about withdrawing from or suspending your studies.

We can help with queries via social media so follow Student Finance England’s Facebook page and Twitter channels – look out for details of our Facebook Live sessions which give students the opportunity to put their questions to our team of student finance experts.

SLC’s Executive Director of Operations, Derek Ross, said: “This is a busy time for students as they prepare to start or return to their university or college. We are doing everything we can to ensure the payment process is as smooth as possible for students, and they can do their part by following our advice. We appreciate some students may still have changes to make to their course, university or college and it’s vital that they update their information online as soon as possible to ensure their finance is in place at the start of term.

“Our contact centres are open daily and there is also lots of information available on our dedicated payment page and on our social media channels to help students, and their parents and partners, to get prepared for payment this autumn.”

Extra University Places Announced

Over 9,000 additional places approved at UK universities for courses to deliver vital services and support the economy.

Published 30 July 2020 From: Department for EducationDepartment of Health and Social Care, and Michelle Donelan MP

Michelle Donelan

Extra university places for engineering, science and nursing courses have been made available for September, the Universities Minister has announced today.

Michelle Donelan has confirmed that the Government has approved over 9,000 additional places at UK universities for courses that will deliver vital services, support the economy and generate positive outcomes for students and the taxpayer.

As part of the Government’s aim to drive an increase in science and innovation and encourage STEM subject take-up, it has approved more than 1,300 extra university places for engineering courses, 756 places for bio-sciences and almost 500 for maths courses.

A total of 5,611 places for healthcare courses have also been allocated at universities in England to support the NHS, with 3,803 of these additional places going to nursing courses.

Last month the Prime Minister stated that investing in skills is crucial to our economic recovery post-coronavirus.

Today’s announcement will not only help thousands more people gain knowledge that will help them progress in life, but also to help rebuild Britain.

Universities Minister Michelle Donelan said:

The coronavirus will not stop us from boosting growth in vital subjects like science, engineering, and maths.

These courses not only deliver some of the best outcomes for students, they will also be integral to driving innovation, helping our public services and building the skills the country needs.

Bids for extra places were assessed on the quality of each provider, including their rates of continuation and graduate employment outcomes. In total there were 3,859 eligible bids from 38 providers for additional places on courses of strategic importance. All bids that met the set criteria have been accepted.

Bids for healthcare courses in England totalled 5,611 and the Department for Health and Social care have accepted all additional places.

The allocation of places announced today follows the introduction of temporary student number controls, in which institutions were given the opportunity to bid for 10,000 additional places – at least 5,000 for healthcare courses and 5,000 for courses of strategic importance.

DfE enquiries

Central newsdesk – for journalists020 7783 8300

General enquiries – for members of the public0370 000 2288

ESFA Procurement Opportunity

ESFA procurement opportunity launching soon for providers to access additional funding to deliver 19 to 24 AEB funded traineeships.

Published 29 July 2020 From: Education and Skills Funding Agency

Stock image of a person writing on a piece of paper.

Following the publication of the government’s Plan for Jobs  which included a £111 million investment to triple the number of traineeships available, we are planning a procurement opportunity so providers can access funding to deliver 19 to 24 adult education budget (AEB) funded traineeships.

We will be looking for providers with the capacity to start providing high-quality traineeships quickly through a ring-fenced contract for service. Details about how we will manage new traineeship opportunities for 16 to 18-year-olds will be published shortly.

Opportunities to bid for additional 19 to 24 AEB traineeship funding will be handled through the Department for Education’s e-sourcing portal. Organisations who do not already have an existing account must register one as this is the only method to access tendering documentation. You can register online.

The Plan for Jobs included a commitment to provide thousands of new traineeships to get young people aged 16 to 24 (up to 25 for those with an Education, Health and Care Plan) in England into work.

As well as an investment of £111m for 2020 to 2021, there are new flexibilities and opportunities which will strengthen traineeships and widen access to them for young people:

  • young people qualified up to Level 3 (rather than Level 2 previously) are now eligible for a traineeship
  • there is a more flexible work experience offer of minimum 70 hours, with multiple employers if needed
  • we want to see flexible content and qualifications that prepares trainees for progression to apprenticeships and jobs through a direct line of sight to the occupational standards
  • an increased AEB traineeship learning aim cost of £1500.
  • employers who offer new traineeship work placements will receive £1,000 per learner (up to ten learners) to support engagement and assist with costs such as the purchase of additional PPE for trainees
  • traineeships can now last up to 12 months, allowing twice as much time on a programme for those young people with particular needs who need it. We still expect traineeships to support young people into work as quickly as possible.
  • we want traineeships to move young people towards work or an apprenticeship more than ever before. 

We will publish an updated traineeships framework for delivery and funding rules over the next month.

End to ESFA Funding Subcontracting Brokers

Article by Billy Camden published in FE WEEK

Using brokers in subcontracting deals will be a “serious breach” of funding rules next year, the government said today as it announced the first steps to clamping down on subcontracting in FE.

Training providers have also been told to publish a “rationale” for subcontracting, their management fee structure and a list of subcontracting partners on their websites by October 31.

The measures were outlined in new subcontracting guidance for 2020/21, published today by the Education and Skills Funding Agency.

Last month, the ESFA released its response to a consultation that was run earlier this year and proposed major changes to subcontracting.

The agency wants to see a “significant reduction” of the practice in FE and will roll out strict measures, such as volume caps, over the next three years.

For academic year 2020/21, the ESFA said today that the use of brokers to source a subcontracting partner is “not permitted and will be treated as a breach of contract/funding agreement”.

“By brokers we mean where a third-party matches, for a fee, a provider with an unused allocation with a provider that can secure enrolments of learners to utilise it,” the agency explained, adding that they have “strengthened our levers to act and will do so where we find cases of provision being subject to brokerage”.

FE Week has reported on multiple cases of brokers cashing in on last minute subcontracting deals in recent years.

In March we revealed on how a learner find firm was attempting to broker a subcontracting deal for 16 to 18-year-old trainees who had already completed their placement at football clubs.

The only other change coming into force next year is a requirement for “all providers to publish a clear educational rationale for their subcontracting position on their website alongside their management fee structure and a list of subcontracting partners”.

The guidance states that directly funded institutions should “set out in their organisation’s strategic aims their reason for subcontracting, which must enhance the quality of their student offer”. The rationale “should be signed off by governors and boards and published on their website”.

The ESFA said they expect this information to be published by 31 October 2020 and it should be “easy to navigate to from the front page of the organisation’s education and training web pages”.

Other reforms will be introduced in 2022 and 2023.

New Package of Support for T Level Industry Placements

A new package of support to help employers and FE providers deliver high-quality industry placements which are at the heart of pioneering new T Level qualifications have been announced (Friday 3 July) by Gillian Keegan, Minister for Skills and Apprenticeships.

Engineering industry placement

T Levels – high-quality technical alternatives equivalent to three A Levels – have been created in collaboration with industry experts so students gain the skills they need to succeed in the workplace and so businesses can access the workforce they need to thrive.

A unique part of a T Level will be the completion of a high-quality industry placement – of at least 315 hours, or approximately 45 days – where students will build the knowledge and skills and develop the confidence they need in a workplace environment.

Two new reports published today highlight that providers have found that the government’s Capacity and Delivery Fund (CDF) has made a really positive impact, giving them the opportunity to recruit staff to start preparing for the delivery of T Level industry placements, establish the right infrastructure and procedures within their organisations and to build strong relationships with local employers. Employers also reported that they appreciated the flexibility of the different placement models published last year which made it easier for them to host learners on placements.

The package of support announced today will build on this, helping to make sure employers and FE providers can offer really high quality placements when they start delivering T Levels. It includes:

  • New guidance setting out the key roles and responsibilities for providers and employers, and a new guide for students to help them prepare for their placement, with hands on support and advice so everyone can get the best experience possible.
  • Additional delivery models for employers and providers including new models for the way industry placements can be delivered in the Construction and Engineering & Manufacturing routes, to reflect modern practices, and allowing Capacity and Delivery Fund placements to be delivered over two academic years, to bring them in line with T Levels, with a reduced delivery target of 25% for the 2020/21 academic year, to reflect the impact of the coronavirus on employers.
  • In recognition of the impact of coronavirus on employers, the government will extend the Employer Support Fund pilot, launched in September 2019, to offer financial support to employers in selected regions where funding is a barrier to them hosting high-quality industry placements. The Employer Support Package, a suite of online guidance, case studies and workshops to help employers to host high-quality industry placements, will also continue: and
  • The government will also procure an organisation with the appropriate expertise to support 2020, 2021 and 2022 providers to help them deliver high-quality placements in line with the delivery guidance.

Gillian Keegan, Minister for Apprenticeships and Skills said:

Industry placements will give young people invaluable first-hand experience of the workplace that they wouldn’t be able to get elsewhere, that is what makes T Levels unique and why they are at the centre of our ambitious plans to transform technical education.

These placements will not only boost student’s confidence and knowledge but will also provide employers with a pipeline of skilled workers for the future, something that will be more important than ever as we recover from coronavirus.

With this new package we are supporting businesses and providers so they are able to give students access to the best possible experiences and ensure all placements are high-quality from the start, so we can set up the next generation for success.

The first three T Levels in Design, Surveying and Planning for Construction, Digital Production, Design and Development and Education and Childcare will be taught from September 2020 with more rolled out gradually between 2021 and 2023. The new qualifications will play a key part in rebuilding the economy after the coronavirus outbreak, boosting access to high-quality technical education for thousands of young people so they can progress to the next level, whether that is getting a job, going on to further study or an apprenticeship.

The government is investing significantly in technical education and training including T Levels. Last year the Chancellor announced an additional £400 million boost for 16 to 19 education in 2020-21, including funding to support the first T Level providers to deliver high-quality courses. A further £133 million will also be invested to ensure students have access to industry standard equipment and high-quality facilities.

Bruce Boughton, People Development Manager, Lovell Partnerships said:

With the ongoing skills shortages in both the construction trades and professions, industry placements give us a chance to see and work with young people as a shortcut in the recruitment process. Having spent nearly three months working with us, they are already part of the team and understand the company and how we work.

Cian Short, Group Apprentice Manager, Bakkavor said:

T Levels have the potential to greatly improve technical education in the UK. With more focus being placed on ‘on the job’ experience through the industry placements, employers will be receiving students who are far better prepared, either to go straight into a role or to join a Higher or Degree Apprenticeship.

For more information on T Levels and industry placements, visit https://www.tlevels.gov.uk/employers

ESFA Reveals Covid Financial Support Offer for 16-19 Private Training Providers

Private training providers whose recruitment of 16 to 19 students has been “limited” due to Covid-19 have been offered financial support to ease budget pressures.

From 22nd June 2020, independent learning providers (ILPs) can make a business case to the Education and Skills Funding Agency to prevent clawback of any underperformance they have experienced for this group of learners.

The ESFA said:

“ILPs may be recruiting fewer part-time students than they would normally recruit between March 2020 to July 2020.

“This will impact on the level of funding that these students would usually attract and will result in clawback of funds for 2019 to 2020.

“The ESFA will support ILPs whose recruitment of students, to a 16 to 19 study programme, have been limited due to the lockdown situation and who have faced clawback for under performance.”

For approved cases, the ESFA said it will base the expected delivery in March to July on the previous year’s delivery for students recruited between 1 March 2019 and 31 July 2019, taking up to half of this into account.

In addition, the agency will “add the actual delivery for students recruited between March 2020 and July 2020, up to a maximum of 100 per cent of the 2018 to 2019 funded delivery for March 2019 to July 2019”.

No clawback relief will be possible if the cash delivery in 2019 to 2020 exceeds the cash delivery in 2018 to 2019 for the period from 1 March to 31 July for each year.

The ESFA added that to further support ILPs, they are extending the clawback period to include January 2021 to March 2021.

“The clawback that is planned for July 2020 will be included into the re-profiling, from August 2020 to March 2021. This does not need to be requested and will be shown in the R10 reconciliation statement.

“There may be a small number of exceptions where a risk to ESFA and public funds is identified. In these instances, we cannot delay July 2020 clawback, but we will extend the clawback profile until March 2021.”

The ESFA made clear this funding support is a “one-off” in response to the unexpected disruption caused by the arrival of coronavirus and ILPs should “not expect this to be repeated in future”.

ILPs making a business should also “not seek” support from government’s Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) to furlough staff whose salaries are paid from continuing ESFA or any other public income.

“ILPs submitting a business case must demonstrate they have not received support from the CJRS to furlough staff involved in the continued direct delivery of provision remotely of 16 to 19 study programmes and where possible recruitment of 16 to 19 students between March 2020 to July 2020,” the ESFA said.

“The Department for Education is considering appropriate measures to monitor use of claims from CJRS in order to detect any duplication of public funding and will be considering potential options to recover misused public funding as required.”

5 Ways to Demonstrate Your College’s Positive Intent and Impact
June 24, 2020
0

The following article is by  Anthony Horne – Emsi’s Managing Director for Asia Pacific.

One of the most common areas of discussion I am having with senior management in the Further Education sector right now is that Anthony Horneof “demonstrating positive intent and impact”.

This is perhaps unsurprising, since Ofsted have recently included sections on Intent and Impact in their proposed new Education Inspection Framework.

But with the spotlight on these themes, it is perhaps an opportune time to look at whether we can measure the outcomes of Intent and Impact in a tangible way.

The answer is we can, but what is particularly interesting is how many different angles of measuring Intent and Impact are highlighted by college leaders.

For example, here’s a sample of some of the comments I’ve heard over recent weeks from college principals, about what they would like to be able to measure: Read more