Avatar
Hello
Guest
Log In or Sign Up
Help and Support for Returning to Work
October 22, 2019
0

Government Equalities Office has published guidance for those looking to return to work following a career break for caring responsibilities, and information for employers wanting to implement a returners programme at their organisation.

Businesses and organisations across the UK face the same issues around addressing the gender pay gap, accessing talented staff, reducing training costs and improving diversity.

There are currently over 1.2 million people in the UK who are out of work for caring responsibilities but would like to return to employment.

Recruiting experienced returners could help employers respond to these business challenges and help people back into work.

Returner programmes are a key priority of the government. The Government Equalities Office has awarded in the region of £1.5 million to sixteen organisations supporting returners in the private sector. They have also launched returner programmes that target key workforces in the public sector, including social workers, health professionals, and police investigators.

Applying for a returner programme

Returning to work after a career break can be challenging. There are a number of dedicated returner programmes that provide training and support to help people back into the workforce in a way that makes sense for them. Individual criteria for each programme will differ but most programmes ask for applicants that have been out of work for a year or more, either on a career break or for caring responsibilities.

Read our Returners Toolkit for advice, tips and support on returning to work.

Share your story

We are interested in hearing from returners who are currently on, or who have completed returner programmes. To share your own story, please email geo.strategiccomms@geo.gov.uk.

Read Returner Yemi’s experience of a returner programme.

Setting up a returner programme

Research shows that setting up a returner programme can have significant benefits for businesses, helping to increase the diversity of staff and expanding the level of experience within an organisation. There are two main routes for employing returners into your organisation:

  • Returnships: fixed-term contracts that cover competitive pay and extra support like training, coaching and mentoring.
  • Supported hires: permanent roles for returners, offering the same additional support such as training, coaching and mentoring.

Guidance on setting up a returners programme

Returner programmes: best practice guide for employers 
This guidance provides a framework for organisations to develop effective returner programmes. It applies to organisations in all sectors and of all sizes.

Returners: an introductory toolkit for employers 
This toolkit describes the benefits of returner programmes, top tips for developing a returner programme, how to attract recruits and case studies.

Returners: The Benefits of Implementing a Returners Programme 
This infographic provides an overview of the benefits of Returner programmes and employment methods.

Adapting your current employment practices

Our evidence shows that making small adjustments to a business’s employment practices can have a significant impact on the number of returners applying to your vacancies. Best practice includes:

  • Advertising your job vacancy as suitable for returners
  • Enhancing and promoting your flexible working policies – including flexible working opportunities to job advertisements

Find further guidance on flexible working practices and the 100 ways to work flexibly campaign.

Hints & Tips on Copyright Law
October 21, 2019
0

Why do I need to know about it?

In a 24/7, interconnected online world, where we have the ability to share almost anything at a click or swipe, it can be hard to discern the original creator of something. 

This has actually been a problem since 1710, when the first copyright legislation was created. But as the way we create and consume content changes, new challenges are cropping up and the area is arguably more important than ever. 

“Copyright law is important for businesses and individuals because it is a mechanism to help protect individuals’ and businesses’ creative output. If you invest time and effort in creating intellectual property [IP] it is right that you should be able to benefit financially,” states Martyn Freeman, general counsel, BBC Studios. 

“Copyright law, along with trademark law, design law and patent law, protects people and entities who create something,” says Kieron Sharp, CEO of the Federation Against Copyright Theft (FACT). “The purpose of the law is to enable a person to make a profit from a creation – although the creator is entitled to give it away. It is also there to protect the product of a company where its profitability and the livelihoods of the workers depend on selling a unique product.” 

What do I need to know?

Copyright law in the UK is governed by the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988. The act has eight fixed categories of ‘works’ that content must fall into to be covered. These are: literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, sound recordings, films, broadcasts, and typographical arrangements. 

While you may think only ‘creative’ organisations need to worry about copyright, these categories actually cover a broad spectrum. “A literary work could be an instruction manual. An artistic work could be a company logo,” says Joshua Marshall, a senior associate in the intellectual property and technology protection and enforcement team at Fieldfisher. 

The law can be a little grey over when something is copied and when it’s been inspired by another work, Marshall adds: “Existing copyright works can be used as inspiration, provided a qualitatively substantial part of the work is not taken. Just because a part of something has been copied, that does not mean copyright has been infringed.” 

The law could soon change, however. The EU’s Copyright Directive, passed in April 2019, is an effort to modernise copyright legislation, prevent piracy and ensure that original creators are paid properly. The UK has two years to comply, so depending on whether Brexit happens as planned we will need to update our laws. 

Regarding proper pay, Time calculated in 2014 how much artists earned from their songs being streamed on Spotify. Taylor Swift’s ‘Shake it Off’ earned between $280,000 and $390,000 (£228,397 and £318,125), which sounds substantial. But considering the song was streamed 46.3 million times, that makes each play worth less than a penny. This money could then be split further, depending on whether Swift owns the full copyright to the song (unlikely). 

Regarding illegal content sharing, video hosting platform YouTube is currently embroiled in talks over whether it will be obliged to roll out an upload filter that will catch and block copyright violations. 

When might I be in breach of the law?

You could be creating copyrighted material without knowing it. Written a staff handbook? That’s copyrighted. Designed a poster campaign? Also copyrighted. Unfortunately you probably don’t own that copyright. 

“Copyright law provides that an employer owns the copyright in works produced by its employees during the normal course of their employment. Where this is not the case – for freelancers and contractors for example – the company would usually take an assignment of the copyright in any work produced by those individuals while working under contract,” explains Freeman. 

“Unlike some other IP rights, copyright is an unregistered right meaning it arises automatically on creation of the ‘work’. As a result businesses and individuals create copyright works every day without realising it,” Marshall adds. 

If you work in a creative or innovation-orientated sector competition (and copying) could be rife. “It may be the case that employees within companies rip each other off,” says Sharp. Which could lead to workplace conflict over who actually created something. 

Anything else?

Copyright law will continue to be topical. The Intellectual Property Office is investing in educating the public, including school children, on copyright issues. 

“There are many threats from people who believe copyright is unnecessary and certainly politicians across Europe would like to see copyright law simplified or abandoned,” explains Sharp. “All of us who work in this world would love to see it simplified but it’s difficult to know how to achieve that – by its very nature its bureaucratic. Protection of creations is an absolute necessity and as yet no-one has come up with a better system.”

The article first appeared in HR Magazine News

Questions Managers Should Ask Remote Employees
September 30, 2019
0

As more employees are working from home or spending days on the road visiting learners and employers, how do you ensure you have the right conversation that homes in on issues that are often unspoken?

Here are 11 questions that you can use to create better dynamics with your remote employees, faster.  Ask these questions when you first start working with any remote employee, or at regular intervals (e.g., every half year), to check in on changes. 

1. What do you like best and least about working remotely?  

Follow-on questions: 

  • What is the high point of a typical day (for example, yesterday)? 
  • What is the low point of a typical day (for example, yesterday)? 

What this question uncovers

Motivation analysis: This question helps you find out what motivates and demotivates your direct reports. Learn more by asking for more context on comments. For example, if they say ‘my high point is getting into a flow state with a project.’  Ask: ‘what creates a flow state for you?’

2. What is your work setup like?  

Follow-on questions:

  • What equipment or process improvements would make things 10% better? 
  • What technology issues have you encountered? 

What this question uncovers

Environment analysis: This question helps you listen for ways to optimize setup and workflow. While doing so, you can also arrange for your remote employee to interview other remote employees from cross-functional departments to learn their setup tips. 

3. What is your daily routine? 

Follow-on questions

  • What do you do to take breaks/ recharge? 
  • Are you able to fully disconnect when on vacation or at the end of the day? 

What this question uncovers

Energy management: Listen for spots to help optimize time boundaries. A big danger for remote employees is burnout since work and life are blended. When working in-person at the office it’s easier to have delineated boundaries for starting and stopping work. 

4. What has your experience been with working remotely in the past? 

Follow-on questions: 

  • What were some challenges in your previous setups?
  • What were some of the learnings you had? 

What this question uncovers

Level of support needed: There is a presumption that working remotely is easy – one simply does what one would normally do, but at a different location. This isn’t true. What we’ve found in our research is that working remotely requires a unique skill set that gets honed with time, including over-communication, clarifying expectations, assertiveness, proactivity, and more. Asking about prior experience with remote work helps you gauge your direct report’s skillsets and determine if more guidance or training is needed to set them up well for success.

5. What challenges do you feel remote workers have compared to those in the office? 

Follow-on questions: 

  • What could make things easier?
  • What benefits/advantages do remote workers have compared to those in the office? 

What this question uncovers

Perception/fairness markers: The human brain is wired to track comparisons between conditions, including in this case in-person vs. remote dynamics. Sometimes remote employees feel more is happening at the office than really is (e.g., team meetings that they are not a part of, benefits they miss out on, etc.). This question helps you surface unspoken issues and re-set expectations if there is a feeling of misbalance. This includes a conversation around perks. The downside of working remotely is getting access to things free snacks or onsite company celebrations, etc, but the positive trade is flexibility, autonomy, no need for a commute, etc.

6. Would you say our meetings are remote-friendly? 

Follow-on questions: 

  • Can you hear and see well? 
  • On a scale from 1-10, how easy is it for you to contribute during a meeting? 

What this question uncovers

Meetings culture: Team meetings are often harder on folks who are dialing in, yet easy to optimize. This question will help you hear, from your remote employee’s perspective, small optimization ideas. As an example, one easy hack LifeLabs Learning has found to quickly improve perceived meeting quality (PMQ) is to have each person in the in-person meeting dial in using their laptop and laptop camera and a jabra mic for the room. With this, all people in the in-person room can speak to each other like normal, but the remote person can see a close-up view of each person who is speaking. 

7. Who do you connect with most often at work? 

Follow-on questions:

  • Which coworkers or departments do you wish you had more connection with? 
  • Who do you go to when you need support or have process suggestions or improvement ideas?

What this question uncovers

Support network: When working remotely, it is harder to make connections, yet an essential brain craving for all humans is to feel like we belong. Asking ‘who do you connect with most often’ and the follow on questions helps you realize if your direct report needs help building out their network. Creating relationship capital for your direct report is easy: you can link them to other people doing similar work, find ways to make their work more visible by creating demos, or set them up for informational interviews with relevant departments. 

8. How do you feel about how often you visit the office? 

Follow-on questions: 

  • Is this the right amount or would you like it to be more or less often? 
  • When you meet with other teammates, do you/ they turn your camera on? 

What this question uncovers

Belonging: This question helps you uncover how your direct report feels about the amount of contact they get and allows you to explain decision criteria around in-person gatherings. Having the right amount of in-person time matters when working from afar. Our research shows that ‘frequency beats length’ when it comes to having contact. What this means is that flying a direct report in for in-person time is important, but having cameras on in order to see each other frequently is even more important.

9. What are some things your prior managers did that you liked? 

Follow-on questions: 

  • What’s something you didn’t like? 
  • What’s something I could do 10% better? 

What this question uncovers

Managerial relationship: This question helps you understand how to work best with your employee. It opens feedback lines by normalizing that your team cares about optimizing work dynamics. It also helps you improve one-on-one meetings for the future. 

10. How consistent are our information systems? 

Follow-on questions: 

  • Which apps do you most use in your daily workflow? When do you use Slack, text, Jira, etc.? When do you feel confused about which systems to use? 
  • Where are we consistent/inconsistent as a team?

What this question uncovers

Communication systems: When working remotely, it is particularly important to know which medium to use for which type of information. This question helps assess confusion spots in the system. 

11. What do you want to learn more about regarding our team or company? 

Follow-on questions: 

  • Has any news surprised you recently? 
  • How included do you feel in team decisions? 

What this question uncovers

Information flow: When working remotely, people sometimes feel out of the loop. This question helps you hear if they feel or are excluded. You can then optimize systems or explain the context.

Article first produced by LifeLabs Learning: LifeLabs provides training for managers, execs, and teams, with a focus on rapid skill acquisition and tipping points: the skills that make the most difference in the workplace. 

30 Behavioural Interview Questions Clients Should Be Ready to Answer
September 10, 2019
0

Interview prep dictates that clients should have their elevator pitch ready, a few stories polished (for the behavioural interview questions they’ll probably be asked), and a good sense of what they have to offer. So, how do they get there? Lots of practice, ideally aloud.

To help them better prepare for their next interview, here are 30behaviourall interview questions sorted by topic.

Behavioural interview questions require candidates to share examples of specific situations they’ve been in where they had to use certain skills. According to the Society for Human Resource Management, the answers “should provide verifiable, concrete evidence as to how a candidate has dealt with issues in the past.” In short, it’s a way to let past work performance prove what they are capable of doing in the future for this potential employer.

Behavioral Interview Questions 1-5

Teamwork

For questions like these, you want a story that illustrates your ability to work with others under challenging circumstances. Think team conflict, difficult project constraints, or clashing personalities.

  1. Talk about a time when you had to work closely with someone whose personality was very different from yours.
  2. Give me an example of a time you faced a conflict while working on a team. How did you handle that?
  3. Describe a time when you struggled to build a relationship with someone important. How did you eventually overcome that?
  4. We all make mistakes we wish we could take back. Tell me about a time you wish you’d handled a situation differently with a colleague.
  5. Tell me about a time you needed to get information from someone who wasn’t very responsive. What did you do?

Behavioral Interview Questions 6-10

Client-facing Skills

If the role you’re interviewing for works with clients, definitely be ready for one of these. Find an example of a time where you successfully represented your company or team and delivered exceptional customer service.

  1. Describe a time when it was especially important to make a good impression on a client. How did you go about doing so?
  2. Give me an example of a time when you did not meet a client’s expectation. What happened, and how did you attempt to rectify the situation?
  3. Tell me about a time when you made sure a customer was pleased with your service.
  4. Describe a time when you had to interact with a difficult client. What was the situation, and how did you handle it?
  5. When you’re working with a large number of customers, it’s tricky to deliver excellent service to them all. How do you go about prioritizing your customers’ needs?

Behavioural Interview Questions 11-15

Ability to Adapt

Times of turmoil are finally good for something! Think of a recent work crisis you successfully navigated. Even if your navigation didn’t feel successful at the time, find a lesson or silver lining you took from the situation.

  1. Tell me about a time you were under a lot of pressure. What was going on, and how did you get through it?
  2. Describe a time when your team or company was undergoing some change. How did that impact you, and how did you adapt?
  3. Tell me about the first job you’ve ever had. What did you do to learn the ropes?
  4. Give me an example of a time when you had to think on your feet in order to delicately extricate yourself from a difficult or awkward situation.
  5. Tell me about a time you failed. How did you deal with the situation?

Behavioral Interview Questions 16-20

Time Management Skills

In other words, get ready to talk about a time you juggled multiple responsibilities, organized it all (perfectly), and completed everything before the deadline.

  1. Tell me about a time you had to be very strategic in order to meet all your top priorities.
  2. Describe a long-term project that you managed. How did you keep everything moving along in a timely manner?
  3. Sometimes it’s just not possible to get everything on your to-do list done. Tell me about a time your responsibilities got a little overwhelming. What did you do?
  4. Tell me about a time you set a goal for yourself. How did you go about ensuring that you would meet your objective?
  5. Give me an example of a time you managed numerous responsibilities. How did you handle that?

Behavioral Interview Questions 21-25

Communication Skills

You probably won’t have any trouble thinking of a story for communication questions, since it’s not only part of most jobs; it’s part of everyday life. However, the thing to remember here is to also talk about your thought process or preparation.

  1. Give me an example of a time when you were able to successfully persuade someone to see things your way at work.
  2. Describe a time when you were the resident technical expert. What did you do to make sure everyone was able to understand you?
  3. Tell me about a time when you had to rely on written communication to get your ideas across to your team.
  4. Give me an example of a time when you had to explain something fairly complex to a frustrated client. How did you handle this delicate situation?
  5. Tell me about a successful presentation you gave and why you think it was a hit.

Behavioral Interview Questions 26-30

Motivation and Values

A lot of seemingly random interview questions are actually attempts to learn more about what motivates you. Your response would ideally address this directly even if the question wasn’t explicit about it.

  1. Tell me about your proudest professional accomplishment.
  2. Describe a time when you saw some problem and took the initiative to correct it rather than waiting for someone else to do it.
  3. Tell me about a time when you worked under close supervision or extremely loose supervision. How did you handle that?
  4. Give me an example of a time you were able to be creative with your work. What was exciting or difficult about it?
  5. Tell me about a time you were dissatisfied in your work. What could have been done to make it better?
Two Evidence-Based Strategies to Settle Interview Nerves
September 2, 2019
0

What do you do to calm down before a job interview? Some candidates call their loved ones for emotional support, others rehearse practiced answers, some fidget – the list goes on.

Feeling anxious about job interviews is normal but can be very uncomfortable and unwanted. Consequently, there are many ways that individuals attempt to settle their nerves.

A few years ago, two Canadian psychology researchers from the University of Guelph were interested in how to manage interview worries. The researchers, Amanda Feiler and Deborah Powell, adapted two short interventions commonly used to reduce social anxiety and tested them with a sample of 104 interviewees in Southern Ontario. Study participants were diverse in terms of ethnicity and age, and there was an even split of both unemployed and employed individuals. As the researchers found that both short strategies helped reduce interview anxiety for most individuals in the study, they may also be effective for your clients.

The link between social anxiety and interview anxiety

Candidates often worry that they will accidentally give off the wrong impression to the interviewer. This is because social anxiety can be part of interview anxiety. That is, those who get interview jitters can sometimes worry that they will behave inappropriately, interviewers will not like them or they will be seen as awkward. Since worrying about interacting with others makes up part of interview anxiety, Feiler and Powell theorized that if a strategy worked to reduce social anxiety, it could also help manage interview anxiety. (Of note, since interview anxiety is not a mental illness, the type of social anxiety people experience in interviews is not the same as those diagnosed with social anxiety disorder.)

Those who get anxious around others are vigilant about the way they present themselves; they can overthink the way they look or the way their actions are being perceived by others. Additionally, those who experience worries in social situations can be afraid of receiving negative judgment and criticism. Since the job interview is an important event where jobseekers will be evaluated by others, interviews can be particularly fear-provoking.

Nervous man in a job interview
Strategy 1: A shift in focus

Those who worry about interacting with others tend to focus their attention on themselves, rather than the situation around them. Interestingly, socially anxious individuals tend to see themselves through a third-person perspective, rather than through their own eyes. They can feel as though how they think they look is the way they actuallylook to others. For example, if an anxious job applicant feels unprepared, they may believe the interviewer will absolutely notice their lack of preparation. These worries about how others see them contribute to increased anxiety in the interview.

Worried interviewees can spend an excessive amount of mental effort worrying about the impression they are making. The result? Nervous interviewees could potentially be distracted by imagining what the interviewer is thinking about them, rather than how to answer interview questions effectively.

To shift their attention away from themselves, interviewees can try this short exercise:

 Before the interview begins, take 15 to 20 seconds to close your eyes and imagine yourself in the interview. Then, imagine focusing attention away from yourself to your surroundings. At the time of the interview, try to re-direct your attention to things around you. This could mean being attentive to the interviewer’s voice, features of the room or the meaning of the question. Try to be fully engaged in the interview by focusing only on the reality of your surroundings rather than the “what if?” worries in your head.

Strategy 2: Picture success

An important ingredient for interview success is believing in one’s abilities. Another thought pattern that some anxious interviewees engage in is having a negative belief of how the interview is going or will go. Nervous interviewees may overestimate their likelihood of “failure” in an interview, perhaps saying to themselves: “I wish I had more interview experience” or “This interview is not going well.” Alternatively, worried interviewees may picture themselves in scenarios where they are failing an interview. So, a strategy to change this pattern of thought is to imagine themselves doing the opposite: performing well. By picturing success, jobseekers can counter negative images of failure. Here’s a strategy you can share with your clients:

We have all had moments in life where we felt confident, successful and relaxed. Next time you are in an interview waiting room, try to close your eyes and remember a vivid memory where you experienced these positive feelings. You may want to think about what the situation was, who you were with, what you felt and what the good aspects of the situation were. Try to keep this memory vivid in your mind for as long as you can. You can aim to hold this memory for 15 to 30 seconds. In the interview itself, when you are starting to doubt your abilities, try to recall the memory where you felt successful. If more negative images of yourself start to push into your mind, try to push them back out and reflect again on your past success. 

Takeaways

Feeling nervous about interviews is normal, but interviewees don’t need to suffer through it. Psychology research has shown two ways to help counter those interview-day worries. Best of all, both strategies can be used in the waiting room a few minutes before the interview and during the interview itself. First, interviewees can focus their attention on what is happening around them, rather than on how they are performing. Second, candidates can visualize their success in an interview, rather than imagining failure. With these two simple mental tools in hand, your clients can hopefully gain short-term relief from interview anxiety.

Original Study Citation

Feiler, A. R., & Powell, D. M. (2016). The role of self-focused attention and negative self-thought in interview anxiety: A test of two interventions. International Journal of Selection and Assessment, 24, 132-149. https://doi.org/10.1111/ijsa.12136

How to Be Productive When You’re Unemployed
August 28, 2019
0

Hints & Tips for Your Clients

Do you know what to do when unemployed? Whether you were fired or whether you were laid off due to cutbacks, no doubt you’re reeling internally and trying to find a new direction in a world suddenly gone topsy-turvy.

Once the initial shock wears off and ennui sets in, you’ll need to know what things to do when unemployed and bored in order to keep your productivity high.

Obviously, you know you need to find new work, and here’s how to be productive when you’re unemployed so you can find a new job quickly.

How Do You Stay Busy When Unemployed?

It’s tempting to hide under the covers, binge-watch “Game of Thrones” and ignore your plight. But doing so hardly helps you find new employment. Give yourself two or three days to recover from the shock, then get to work.

Depending on where you live and your personal financial situation, you may have a powerful extrinsic motivation to find new work quickly.

Try to take some time, even if only a morning or afternoon, to reflect on what kind of work you truly desire. If you were feeling burnout at your previous job due to finding your work meaningless, a job loss is a perfect time to switch careers.

Think about what you used to play as when you were a child. Maybe you’ve dreamed of becoming a teacher. If you lack a certificate but have a bachelor’s degree, consider applying for an online or in-person tutoring position. Always fantasized about working with animals? Now is the time to explore a potential career as a veterinary assistant.

Soul-searching definitely makes the list of things to do when unemployed and bored. But how to be productive and work toward getting that new dream job?

How Do You Be Productive When You Don’t Have a Job?

Nearly every job seeker with a computer knows how to upload a CV to a job site and begin sending applications. But in answer to the question, “What to do when unemployed,” more productive means of finding new work exist.

Take every opportunity to attend networking events in the field you wish to apply. Also, call up your friends and let them know you’re looking for work. While you may feel embarrassed to admit you’re unemployed, this is the best way to find out about insider opportunities friends may know about in their fields.

Looking for work is a full-time job, so make yourself a schedule each Sunday for the week ahead. Tackle high-priority activities such as filling out applications for the jobs which interest you most first on your schedule each day. Reserve afternoons or your least productive hours for sending thank you notes, making phone calls and researching new opportunities.

Prepare and rehearse an elevator pitch so you have an instant speech for yourself ready if you come across a prospective employer unexpectedly.

Prepare a job interview ready bag full of CVs, business cards, hand sanitizer and breath mints to avoid arriving unprepared. You’ll have materials ready to go if you meet someone who is looking for staff by chance!

Above all, avoid falling into despair and unhealthy habits. Keep up your exercise routine and continue meal planning even if you need to adjust the menu slightly to account for the loss in income. Take a pass on using alcohol, nicotine or other drugs to dull the pain of losing your job — impairment makes it tougher to find a new post.

Being Unemployed Doesn’t Mean Being Unproductive

Job loss can cause significant distress, but try to look at this as an opportunity to seek something more in line with your passions.

By remaining productive while you’re unemployed, you improve your chances of finding work more quickly.

How to Decline a Job Offer Due to Salary
August 20, 2019
0

Hints & Tips for Your Clients

When you’re interviewing for jobs, there’s a lot of pressure to land an interview and get that final job offer.

You want something that will help you pursue your passions while also being able to meet your bills and spend a little extra money on fun activities.

The right job for you is out there, but what happens when a job offer is given with a salary that’s lower than what you were expecting?

It’s hard to realize that you can’t take a job because it pays too little, especially if it’s a job you really want to do. The good news is that there’s strategy behind working with the salary that’s initially offered with the job. You don’t necessarily have to take the first number that’s given, and most employers know that people are going to negotiate.

Not sure how to decline a job offer due to salary? Have you ever negotiated a pay raise before you’ve even been given the job? Read on to learn how to do just that without needing to shut down a future with the company you want to work for.

With the right strategy, you can get your future employer to raise your pay to what you believe you should earn, without having to give up the offer and look for employment elsewhere.

Negotiate With Facts

If you have a lengthy history in the job you’ve been offered or valuable experience that qualifies you for the job, it’s time to put that to good use. Look over your work history and figure out what points are most important to why you should be paid a higher salary.

Make a list of those experiences. Maybe you led a team to a major milestone at your old job, have years of experience in what you do or have valuable ideas and game plans that will make you an important player in office culture.

After you make that list, write down what you earn now. What would your salary be in your current or previous job that would be equal to the skills you bring to the workplace?

You can base that improved salary on the average pay for your position in your industry. An employer will be more willing to work with a competitive rate than an outrageous one.

You should also take into consideration what you’ll need to do to start your new job. Will you have to move, and how far would that move be?

On average, people who move in the US pay $2,300-$4,300 to relocate. If your potential employer has already said they can’t cover the cost of your move, mention that an increased salary will help get you there.

Know When to Stop

Decide your minimum salary as soon as you can. It should be higher than what you earned in your last position, competitive with similar roles in your industry and able to cover the cost of living where your new job should be. If your potential employer continually insists that they pay what’s below your minimum salary, it’s time to stop negotiating.

Sometimes when you stop negotiations, it gives your potential employer time to step back and reconsider how they’re willing to meet you in the middle to get you on board. This could end up being just what you need to squeeze those few extra dollars into your salary, or it could be when both parties realize that things aren’t going to work out.

Written by Productivity Theory

How To Engage Employers: A Guide for Schools and Colleges
August 16, 2019
0

The Leicester and Leicestershire Enterprise Partnership Skills Team have collated this employer engagement guide to help schools and colleges to develop and/or enhance their education-business links.

The purpose of this guide is to hlep schools or colleges to build long-lasting relationships with local businesses to enhance the interventions your students receive throughout thier time at your establishment. The guide offers top tips to help you engage with businesses and then sustain those relationships. It is designed as a practice guide to give you the confidence to get started.

https://www.teesvalleycareers.com/education/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2019/02/Employer-engagement-toolkit-Leicestershire.pdf

Number of Workers Clocking up 48hr Weeks Increased By 500%
July 5, 2019
0

Figures by the TUC revealed that, since 2001, the number of employees working 48-hour weeks has risen by a quarter of a million to three million, while half a million British workers suffered from work-related stress in 2018, and 44% said it was due to workload.

With the World Health Organisation defining ‘burnout’ as “a syndrome” resulting from prolonged workplace stress, which has been poorly managed, research collected by Forest Holidays shows why burnout has become a regular occurrence, and the impact this work-related syndrome has on the families.

Combatting Burnout

In 2017, it was reported that 1 in 10 adults had difficulty unwinding in the evenings and on weekends. However, most people don’t realise they are really burnt out until it’s too late, then needing to deal with eliminating the symptoms while also having to combat the stresses that triggered it in the first place. 

Key Factors Leading to Burnout

  • High workload
  • Unclear job expectations
  • Conflicts at work
  • Lack of managerial support
  • Work/life imbalance
  • Stressful working environmental
The Impact of Work on Modern Families

Over three-quarters of parents (78%) admit to putting in extra hours to try and get ahead of their work, with almost 50% stating the most significant impact of this overspill is the ability to increase family quality time, followed closely by a negative effect on their relationship with their partner.

Create A Better Work-Life Balance and Prioritise Quality Time with Loved Ones

Improved mental health, physical wellbeing, creativity and job satisfaction are just a few of the benefits that come from a healthy work-life balance.

However, with the use of technology continuing to rise, research shows that families are spending more time ‘alone-together’ – meaning they’re in the same house but separately.

Studies on the topic have revealed, overall, ‘alone-together’ time has risen by 43%, demonstrating families are often engaging with devices instead of each other.

Regaining the Balance

Further research shows that nearly two-thirds of British families spent fewer days out together in recent years compared to 20 years ago, even though having close relationships being proven to help reduce stress.

Initiate A Digital Detox

Data shows that around 7 in 10 people recognise the benefits of lowering their screen time, and 8 in 10 find having a digital detox liberating, despite having FOMO (the fear of missing out). Setting technology-free days, or phones/emails during certain times, can help to quickly achieve a relaxed period allowing you to focus on loved ones.

Work Remotely

There has been a huge shift in the modern workplace as employers become more accepting of flexible and remote working options. In fact, research by Instant Offices shows 71% of the flexible user becoming more engaged at work, while Around 40% of employees believe work distraction could also be drastically reduced with flexible and remote working options.

Spend More Time Outdoors

Spending time outdoors can have a positive effect in a variety of ways including:

  • Boost moods and fight anxiety – Research shows that being in nature for just 20 minutes will lower stress hormones, such as cortisol levels.
  • Better mental health – Walking has been proven effective in reducing anxiety and depression, and further evidence suggests walking in nature improve this further because different parts of our brains activate in nature.
  • Eliminate fatigue – Studies indicate that people’s mental energy bounces back just by looking at images of nature, while pictures of cities did not effect.
  • Getting vitamin D – An essential vitamin for a well-functioning body, helping to absorb calcium, preventing osteoporosis and reducing inflammation among other things. More than 90% of our vitamin D comes from casual exposure to sunlight.
How to Help Your Clients Ace a Video Job Interview
July 1, 2019
0

Job interviews done by video, for example, using Skype, are becoming more common.

You need to prepare for video interviews differently than you would for normal face-to-face interviews.

Plan where you’ll do the interview

Choose a quiet place with no distractions, and use a computer or laptop computer with a webcam and good internet connection.

A business-woman doing a video job interview
  • Have a plain background that won’t distract your interviewer.
  • Dress like you would for a ‘normal’ interview.
  • Sit comfortably.
Get used to talking to someone using a computer
  • Practice talking to the webcam, not the people on-screen, so you’re more likely to be looking your interviewer in the eye.
  • It’s OK to look at the screen when you’re listening.
  • Try using a headset – it might keep you from talking too loudly or quietly.
Body language is important

Body language is important in video interviews.

If you look off to the side of the computer or fidget, it will stand out to your interviewer.

  • Be upbeat and smile during the interview.
  • Try not to slouch in your seat.
  • Keep your hands down, you may even want to rest them in your lap.
The advantage of a video interview

Your interviewer won’t be able to see any helpful notes you stick to the edge of your screen.

You can stick a few things on there, as long as your body language and eye contact aren’t affected too badly. A note could:

  • remind you to smile or talk more slowly
  • be a question you want to ask at the end of the interview.
Do a test run

Ask a friend to help do a test run a day or two before the interview.

That way, you can check how you look, sort out any technical issues that come up and generally make sure things go smoothly.

  • Use an account name that’s professional and easy to remember such as your first initial and last name.
  • Make sure your background and face are well-lit so the interviewer can see you clearly.
  • Make sure your picture isn’t shaky.