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How to Decline a Job Offer Due to Salary
August 20, 2019
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Hints & Tips for Your Clients

When you’re interviewing for jobs, there’s a lot of pressure to land an interview and get that final job offer.

You want something that will help you pursue your passions while also being able to meet your bills and spend a little extra money on fun activities.

The right job for you is out there, but what happens when a job offer is given with a salary that’s lower than what you were expecting?

It’s hard to realize that you can’t take a job because it pays too little, especially if it’s a job you really want to do. The good news is that there’s strategy behind working with the salary that’s initially offered with the job. You don’t necessarily have to take the first number that’s given, and most employers know that people are going to negotiate.

Not sure how to decline a job offer due to salary? Have you ever negotiated a pay raise before you’ve even been given the job? Read on to learn how to do just that without needing to shut down a future with the company you want to work for.

With the right strategy, you can get your future employer to raise your pay to what you believe you should earn, without having to give up the offer and look for employment elsewhere.

Negotiate With Facts

If you have a lengthy history in the job you’ve been offered or valuable experience that qualifies you for the job, it’s time to put that to good use. Look over your work history and figure out what points are most important to why you should be paid a higher salary.

Make a list of those experiences. Maybe you led a team to a major milestone at your old job, have years of experience in what you do or have valuable ideas and game plans that will make you an important player in office culture.

After you make that list, write down what you earn now. What would your salary be in your current or previous job that would be equal to the skills you bring to the workplace?

You can base that improved salary on the average pay for your position in your industry. An employer will be more willing to work with a competitive rate than an outrageous one.

You should also take into consideration what you’ll need to do to start your new job. Will you have to move, and how far would that move be?

On average, people who move in the US pay $2,300-$4,300 to relocate. If your potential employer has already said they can’t cover the cost of your move, mention that an increased salary will help get you there.

Know When to Stop

Decide your minimum salary as soon as you can. It should be higher than what you earned in your last position, competitive with similar roles in your industry and able to cover the cost of living where your new job should be. If your potential employer continually insists that they pay what’s below your minimum salary, it’s time to stop negotiating.

Sometimes when you stop negotiations, it gives your potential employer time to step back and reconsider how they’re willing to meet you in the middle to get you on board. This could end up being just what you need to squeeze those few extra dollars into your salary, or it could be when both parties realize that things aren’t going to work out.

Written by Productivity Theory

How To Engage Employers: A Guide for Schools and Colleges
August 16, 2019
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The Leicester and Leicestershire Enterprise Partnership Skills Team have collated this employer engagement guide to help schools and colleges to develop and/or enhance their education-business links.

The purpose of this guide is to hlep schools or colleges to build long-lasting relationships with local businesses to enhance the interventions your students receive throughout thier time at your establishment. The guide offers top tips to help you engage with businesses and then sustain those relationships. It is designed as a practice guide to give you the confidence to get started.

https://www.teesvalleycareers.com/education/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2019/02/Employer-engagement-toolkit-Leicestershire.pdf

Number of Workers Clocking up 48hr Weeks Increased By 500%
July 5, 2019
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Figures by the TUC revealed that, since 2001, the number of employees working 48-hour weeks has risen by a quarter of a million to three million, while half a million British workers suffered from work-related stress in 2018, and 44% said it was due to workload.

With the World Health Organisation defining ‘burnout’ as “a syndrome” resulting from prolonged workplace stress, which has been poorly managed, research collected by Forest Holidays shows why burnout has become a regular occurrence, and the impact this work-related syndrome has on the families.

Combatting Burnout

In 2017, it was reported that 1 in 10 adults had difficulty unwinding in the evenings and on weekends. However, most people don’t realise they are really burnt out until it’s too late, then needing to deal with eliminating the symptoms while also having to combat the stresses that triggered it in the first place. 

Key Factors Leading to Burnout

  • High workload
  • Unclear job expectations
  • Conflicts at work
  • Lack of managerial support
  • Work/life imbalance
  • Stressful working environmental
The Impact of Work on Modern Families

Over three-quarters of parents (78%) admit to putting in extra hours to try and get ahead of their work, with almost 50% stating the most significant impact of this overspill is the ability to increase family quality time, followed closely by a negative effect on their relationship with their partner.

Create A Better Work-Life Balance and Prioritise Quality Time with Loved Ones

Improved mental health, physical wellbeing, creativity and job satisfaction are just a few of the benefits that come from a healthy work-life balance.

However, with the use of technology continuing to rise, research shows that families are spending more time ‘alone-together’ – meaning they’re in the same house but separately.

Studies on the topic have revealed, overall, ‘alone-together’ time has risen by 43%, demonstrating families are often engaging with devices instead of each other.

Regaining the Balance

Further research shows that nearly two-thirds of British families spent fewer days out together in recent years compared to 20 years ago, even though having close relationships being proven to help reduce stress.

Initiate A Digital Detox

Data shows that around 7 in 10 people recognise the benefits of lowering their screen time, and 8 in 10 find having a digital detox liberating, despite having FOMO (the fear of missing out). Setting technology-free days, or phones/emails during certain times, can help to quickly achieve a relaxed period allowing you to focus on loved ones.

Work Remotely

There has been a huge shift in the modern workplace as employers become more accepting of flexible and remote working options. In fact, research by Instant Offices shows 71% of the flexible user becoming more engaged at work, while Around 40% of employees believe work distraction could also be drastically reduced with flexible and remote working options.

Spend More Time Outdoors

Spending time outdoors can have a positive effect in a variety of ways including:

  • Boost moods and fight anxiety – Research shows that being in nature for just 20 minutes will lower stress hormones, such as cortisol levels.
  • Better mental health – Walking has been proven effective in reducing anxiety and depression, and further evidence suggests walking in nature improve this further because different parts of our brains activate in nature.
  • Eliminate fatigue – Studies indicate that people’s mental energy bounces back just by looking at images of nature, while pictures of cities did not effect.
  • Getting vitamin D – An essential vitamin for a well-functioning body, helping to absorb calcium, preventing osteoporosis and reducing inflammation among other things. More than 90% of our vitamin D comes from casual exposure to sunlight.
How to Help Your Clients Ace a Video Job Interview
July 1, 2019
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Job interviews done by video, for example, using Skype, are becoming more common.

You need to prepare for video interviews differently than you would for normal face-to-face interviews.

Plan where you’ll do the interview

Choose a quiet place with no distractions, and use a computer or laptop computer with a webcam and good internet connection.

A business-woman doing a video job interview
  • Have a plain background that won’t distract your interviewer.
  • Dress like you would for a ‘normal’ interview.
  • Sit comfortably.
Get used to talking to someone using a computer
  • Practice talking to the webcam, not the people on-screen, so you’re more likely to be looking your interviewer in the eye.
  • It’s OK to look at the screen when you’re listening.
  • Try using a headset – it might keep you from talking too loudly or quietly.
Body language is important

Body language is important in video interviews.

If you look off to the side of the computer or fidget, it will stand out to your interviewer.

  • Be upbeat and smile during the interview.
  • Try not to slouch in your seat.
  • Keep your hands down, you may even want to rest them in your lap.
The advantage of a video interview

Your interviewer won’t be able to see any helpful notes you stick to the edge of your screen.

You can stick a few things on there, as long as your body language and eye contact aren’t affected too badly. A note could:

  • remind you to smile or talk more slowly
  • be a question you want to ask at the end of the interview.
Do a test run

Ask a friend to help do a test run a day or two before the interview.

That way, you can check how you look, sort out any technical issues that come up and generally make sure things go smoothly.

  • Use an account name that’s professional and easy to remember such as your first initial and last name.
  • Make sure your background and face are well-lit so the interviewer can see you clearly.
  • Make sure your picture isn’t shaky.
Three Questions to Ask Your Clients When They Feel Overwhelmed by Career Choices
June 6, 2019
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“Do what you love” is career advice that’s easy to give, but notoriously hard to follow.

For one thing, we can’t always accurately predict what kind of job we’ll love until we’re actually doing it. For another, we may love doing a lot of things: solving math problems, helping others, interior decorating, eating pie, playing with dogs. That doesn’t exactly help narrow down the field.

“Asking clients what do you want is in many ways the wrong question,” Sheena Iyengar, a Columbia Business School professor and author of The Art of Choosing, said at the Indeed Interactive conference in Austin, Texas, this May. “You get a bazillion options.”

There are far better queries that can be made when trying to choose a career path, according to Iyengar’s research. Here are three questions to ponder in order to help clients select the profession that’s right for them, whether they’re preparing to enter the workforce for the first time or mulling a career change.

Read more

Top Tips on How to Spot Confident Job Candidates
May 8, 2019
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A campaign has revealed the micro‐expressions and signs to watch out for when trying to tell if someone is displaying confidence.

Contributor Robert Phipps, body language expert – in assoc. With Grosvenor Casinos.

A campaign by Grosvenor Casinos titled Game Face has uncovered the tell‐tale signs to watch out for when working out if someone is displaying a lack of confidence.

As part of the campaign, Grosvenor Casinos wanted to reveal what micro‐expressions people use to lie and display confidence when playing games such as poker and blackjack. These micro expressions, however, also often appear outside the casino doors and have been seen to happen in job interviews.

Recent research has suggested a staggering 27 job applications result in just 1 job interview (1), therefore it’s no surprise that confidence is increasingly important to stand out in today’s competitive job market. Read more

Hints & Tips: 7 Questions to Ask at Your Second Interview
May 1, 2019
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Hints & Tips for a client ask to a second interview by the Michael Page team

You’ve impressed your prospective employer with your CV, demonstrated a strong understanding of the organisation, asked all the right questions during your first interview, and now you’ve received a callback for a second interview.

If you’ve been asked to return for a follow-up interview, it shows the employer is genuinely considering you for the position. However, it’s far from being a done deal: the second interview is often where your prospective employer is really going to gauge how well you’ll fit into the organisation, and more likely than not, the interviewer will be tossing up between multiple candidates.

The follow-up interview is your chance to stand out, and prove you’re the obvious choice for the job. And one of the best ways to demonstrate this is by asking the right second interview questions. You should also see this as an opportunity to vet your employer in order to get an idea of the company’s future directions, to understand exactly what the company’s expectations are for this role and adjust your own expectations accordingly. Read more

5 TED Talks That Offer Insights on Job Search and Hiring
April 24, 2019
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The job search can be tough. Jobseekers may face rejection after rejection, without knowing why. These talks offer tips to help make the process a little TED-Talks-Education-Logoeasier and offer some insights into the hiring process.


How to make applying for jobs less painful

This brief video by technologist Priyanka Jain examines the new hiring landscape, in which more and more companies are using tech-forward methods to identify candidates. She explains how candidates can leverage technology to benefit them in their job search. Read more

Top Tips for Employers on Getting the Best Out of Apprentices
April 17, 2019
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ARTICLE BY: Stephen Isherwood | 
APPRENTICES NEED TO WORK A LOT HARDER ON DEVELOPING THEIR PROFESSIONALISM AT WORK COMPARED TO GRADUATES, BUT THERE ARE LITTLE DIFFERENCES IN KEY SKILLS SUCH AS RESILIENCE, LEADERSHIP AND DEALING WITH CONFLICT. CONTRIBUTOR STEPHEN ISHERWOOD, CHIEF EXECUTIVE – ISE.

Employers are also twice as likely to report that apprentices lack presentation, analysis, IT, writing, problem solving and interpersonal skills. However, there are few differences between graduates and apprentices in relation to resilience, managing up, leadership, dealing with conflict, self-awareness, career management and emotional intelligence.

Institute of Student Employers (ISE) asked its members about the 76,000 entry-level staff they have hired over the last three years, including graduates, apprentices and school leavers. The Survey revealed that employers are almost four times as likely to raise concerns about how apprentices dress for work in comparison to graduates.

Read more

Tech Tips to Help People with Parkinson’s
April 16, 2019
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On Thursday 11 April 2019, as part of World Parkinson’s Day and joining efforts to #UniteForParkinsons, AbilityNet hosted a free webinar about#UniteForParkinsons banner image Parkinson’s and technology.

Did you know 1 in 37 people will be diagnosed with Parkinson’s in their lifetime? The condition is more common than you might think and on our webinar we demonstrated how with a few simple changes people with Parkinson’s can stay in control of their tech and achieve their goals online.

The webinar contained useful information for people with Parkinson’s as well as their friends, families and colleagues. Those with a professional interest in Parkinson’s would also find the content relevant.

About the webinar

Alex Barker, Advice and Information Officer at AbilityNet, presented this webinar which began with some hard-hitting facts about the condition. AbilityNet’s website has a number of free expert resources about making technology easier to use for people with Parkinson’s which were then shared.

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