Avatar
Hello
Guest
Log In or Sign Up
Portfolio Careers and ‘Side Hustles’

The Association of Independent Professionals and the Self-Employed (IPSE) recently found that 320,500 self-employed people now have two or more jobs

Does this rise of the ‘slashie’ signal a more creative autonomous way of working, or are multiple jobs a sign that people are struggling to make ends meet? And how should employers respond?

Stephan Gerschewski, lecturer in international business and strategy at Henley Business School University of Reading, says:

“Portfolio careers have become increasingly popular over the past few years. Research from Henley found that one in four employees in the UK have a ‘side hustle’, which is consistent with the IPSE findings. The motives for starting one can be grouped into two broad categories: pay or passion. Read more

Have You Paid the Annual Data Protection Charge?

 Information from HR Revenue & Customs.

All businesses (including sole traders and partnerships) that process personal data are required to pay an annual data protection charge to the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) unless a relevant exemption applies.

It is a legal requirement to pay the charge, and failure to do so could result in a fine, but it also makes good business sense as it could have an impact on your business reputation. Once you have paid, your business details are published on the Information Commissioner’s register of data controllers.

There are three levels of charge payable: Read more

To Tackle Our Mental Health Crisis, Career Guidance Could be Surprisingly Important

Being unemployed tends to be bad for your mental health.

We know this from long-term studies which show that people’s mental health often deteriorates when they become unemployed and can improve when they get a new job. It can be a vicious circle, since people with mental health difficulties can also struggle to get hired.

When you don’t have a job, it tends to reduce your access to things that nourish mental well-being: a sense of identity, a sense of purpose, structure to the day, contact with other people and opportunities to use skills. Not to mention money, which is a big source of anxiety if you don’t have a decent supply coming in.

Young people are particularly at risk here, since they tend to be among the hardest hit when the labour market takes a dive. Indeed, it’s hard enough for them to find work when the employment market is buoyant. And this group have more than their fair share of other threats to their mental well-being. They have to deal with the worst of social media, early heartbreaks and combustible friendships. Many will be experimenting with drink and drugs, getting into conflicts with their parents and struggling to have enough money to stand on their own two feet.

In the UK, for example, around one in six people aged 17-19 have some kind of mental health condition, and the incidence among young people more generally has been steadily climbing. In the US, the suicide rate among 18- to 19-year-olds is up 56% in a decade.

Living with the scars

While many big categories of illness, such as cancers or heart problems, tend to present in mid to late adulthood, mental health conditions often appear when people are teenagers or in their early 20s. In many cases, they recur, and the consequences can multiply over someone’s lifetime.

Though most young people experience only passing phases of unemployment, for those who experience longer periods, there is emerging evidence that it can lead to what has been described as “scarring”. They are more likely to struggle to hold down jobs throughout their lives, for instance, and to earn less. There is also recent evidence from Sweden and the US of health effects well into mid-adulthood. From a broader perspective, this is a serious problem for the economy. It means lost productivity, lower tax revenues, and higher sickness-related benefits and medical/social care costs.

If this makes it obvious that we should do whatever we can to minimise youth unemployment, it’s easier said than done. This is a complicated problem that doesn’t lend itself to quick fixes. Yet one area that deserves much more attention is career guidance. People can sometimes be sceptical about its value, based on vague recollections of adolescent conversations with a career adviser that didn’t seem to make much difference to them.

Yet we mustn’t let this blind us to the potential. Like any kind of one-to-one help, career guidance provides a safe space to share worries and concerns. It helps people to review and recognise their strengths, injects hope by giving them a sense of their possible study and work options, and motivates and equips them to take action. Career guidance can help you figure out who you are, what your goals are, and how to get there – and this kind of clarity can act as a buffer against stress and uncertainty.

Above all, career guidance can prevent unemployment. It enables people to access life opportunities in work and education, and opens up all the benefits of participation. Some government initiatives put pressure on unemployed people to take the first available job, irrespective of its quality or relevance to their lives. But career guidance is about long-term planning based on what motivates an individual. Done well, it sets people on a path that can sustain them in the long term.

Room for improvement

The quality of career guidance varies considerably from country to country. Yet a recent OECD study found common problems around the world, including insufficient resources, inadequately prepared staff, and poorer services for students from disadvantaged areas. The study pointed to a number of problems in England, with students demanding “more and better” advice, while concluding that the service in Scotland was “well developed and comprehensive”.

Across the board, there’s much room for improvement. We need to recognise the role that career guidance can play as a public health intervention. It can potentially reach all young people through the school system, and has good access to the most vulnerable groups. It might help build resilience if combined with teaching young people important life skills, such as career management and stress management.

Career guidance may feel far removed from health, but we need to understand that illness has socioeconomic causes, and at least to some extent, socioeconomic remedies. I find that professionals in this field are slowly waking up to the mental health needs of their client base, but this has yet to filter through to many of those in charge of policy. They need to get the message that properly resourced and consistently delivered career services have the power to improve our mental health – both now and for years into the future.

Sector Response to the Augar Review of Post-18 Education and Funding

The independent panel, led by Philip Augar, has published its findings and recommendations for the Government’s reviewImage result for Philip Augar, of post-18 education and funding in England. 

The Augar Review has over 60 recommendations and covers all of HE and FE, both the 50 per cent of young people who do not attend higher education as well as the 50 per cent who do, with the aim of improving opportunity and providing the skills required in a fast-changing economy.

The panel recommends a lifelong learning loan allowance available in modules, an employer-focused suite of higher technical qualifications and free intermediate education for ‘second chance’ adults delivered through a strengthened FE college network.

You can read the full report HERE Read more

UCAS Launches New Adviser Portal as University Applications for 2020 go Live

Teachers and careers advisers have begun using a brand new UCAS portal, transforming the way they manage and track their students’ university and college applications, as the 2020 cycle launches today

The new UCAS adviser portal replaces Apply for Advisers and Adviser Track, giving teachers complete, real-time oversight of their students’ UCAS Undergraduate applications in one place for free.

There are 6,300 UCAS registered centres (mainly schools and colleges) worldwide who will be using the new service. Around two-thirds of the 700,000 undergraduate applications submitted each year are sent through a registered centre. Purchase Order or a correctly authorised contract.

Mental Health Awareness Week: 13 – 19 May 2019

Hosted by the Mental Health Foundation, Mental Health Awareness Week 2019 will take place from Monday 13 to Sunday 19 May 2019. The theme for 2019 is Body Image – how we think and feel about our bodiesMental Health Awareness Week, body image banner

Body image issues can affect all of us at any age. During the week we will be publishing new research, considering some of the reasons why our body image can impact the way that we feel, campaigning for change and publishing practical tools.

Since our first Mental Health Awareness Week in 2001, we’ve raised awareness of topics like stress, relationships, loneliness, altruism, sleep, alcohol and friendship. This year, with your support, we want to reach more people than ever!

Find out more HERE

Employment Law: A Guide to Ten Legal Changes in the Workplace

The information in the following article by Hayley Marles, Senior Associate – DAS Law may be of help when working with employers.

This year is set to be a busy year for employment law. From post-Brexit immigration rule changes and gender pay gap reporting to age discrimination at work, employers are faced with amended employment laws and new deadlines for their organisation to meet.  

Ten important areas of the law that HR professionals and business owners need to be aware of…

1: Increase in National Minimum Wage rates

The National Minimum Wage (NMW) increase in April 2019: Read more

House of Commons Short of Public Sector Apprenticeships Target

Former skills minister Robert Halfon called on the House to ‘set an example to our nation’ by hiring more apprenticesImage result for house of commons

The House of Commons has not yet hit the public-sector apprenticeship target, it has been revealed.

Public-sector bodies have a legal duty, established in the 2016 Enterprise Act, to “have regard” to the target of having at least 2.3 per cent of their workforce comprised of apprentices. Official guidance specifies that “public sector bodies with 250 or more staff in England have a target to employ an average of at least 2.3 per cent of their staff as new apprentice starts over the period of 1 April 2017 to 31 March 2021”.

According to the Department for Education, the target has been calculated to ensure that the public sector delivers its “fair share” of the 3 million apprenticeship starts the government has committed to by 2020.

Read more

A Guide to Apprenticeships – Update 21 March 2019

The updated ‘A Guide to Apprenticeships’ provides information on the opportunities, progression and benefits of doing an apprenticeship with case studies from real apprentices.

The Essential Guide to Apprenticeship Support – provides information for individuals who are considering applying for an apprenticeship, and current apprentices. The information may also be useful for parents, carers and other groups who offer advice and guidance. Read more

Hard Facts Employers Should Consider Before Recruiting Young People Who Are NEET

James Ashall, Chief Executive, Movement to Work provides an insight into how organisations like BAE Systems, BT, Marks and Spencer and the NHS haveMovement to Workbenefited from looking deeper into the labour market.

Movement to Work works with businesses and organisations that have the imagination to give young people who need more support a chance in the workplace through placements and other job opportunities.

Together we have provided over 80,000 placements, and over 50% of those completing them have gone onto employment or back into education.

But, of course, many businesses need more than imagination, they must justify all of their decisions to investors, staff and customers. And the good news is they can. Recruiting this way makes financial sense through lower recruitment costs, ensures a high level of loyalty among incoming staff and improves the morale of existing staff. Read more