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Employer Confidence Plunges as Uncertainty Over #Brexit Bites
March 29, 2019
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New data from the Recruitment and Employment Confederation (REC) shows employers’ confidence in economic prospects for the UK have dropped again, by eight percentage points from last month to net: -28.

This is the lowest level since the JobsOutlook survey began measuring sentiment about the economy amongst Britain’s businesses and is 54 percentage points lower than in June 2016.

Falling confidence in the economy is now affecting hiring decisions in respondents’ own firms. Employers’ confidence in making hiring and investment decisions declined by six percentage points from the previous month to net: -1, the first time this measure has dropped into negative territory since the survey started in 2016.

Despite this weaker outlook, it is clear that employers are ready to hire in some areas – especially where there are skills shortages. More employers planned to increase, rather than decrease their permanent headcount in the short-term, at net: +17. Over the medium-term, forecasts for permanent hiring fell three percentage points this month, but remained positive at net: +22.

Neil Carberry, chief executive of the Recruitment & Employment Confederation, said:

“A year of falling business investment and weeks of Brexit inertia mean no-one should be surprised that employers’ confidence in hiring for their own business is now dropping. For months, businesses have told us that they were concerned about the general outlook for the economy – it is clear to us that this concern is now closer to home. Lower use of temporary labour is a sign of lower demand.

“But our jobs market is robust. Even now, recruiters are finding people new jobs and helping companies to compete. The fact that permanent hiring plans are still positive is a sign that the economy will deliver, if the fog of uncertainty is lifted from British business.

“The extension to the Brexit deadline gives us some space to find a pragmatic deal that will give the UK’s businesses the certainty they need to invest and create jobs. And it avoids a no deal, which the majority of recruiters – in line with the majority of all British businesses – see as deeply problematic for the economy and the jobs market.

“But we cannot delay forever. It is in politicians’ power to make the weaker data we see today a blip. Our labour market is strong. Giving firms certainty about a future deal that supports trade, jobs and investment would get the UK back on track.”

Other statistics from this month’s JobsOutlook include:

  • Half (49 per cent) of UK employers expressed concern about the availability of permanent-hire candidates, with a lack of Engineering & Technical and Health & Social Care workers continuing to cause most concern.
  • At net: -7, the balance of sentiment for hiring agency workers in the short-term was 13 percentage points lower than a year earlier. Sentiment in the medium term was 21 points lower than last year, at net: -8.
  • Following this quarter’s decline in anticipated demand for temporary workers, 35 per cent of employers intending to hire temporary workers expressed concern over the sufficient number of agency workers with the necessary skills they require. This is the same proportion as a year earlier. Employers are expecting the most severe skills shortages among construction workers, followed by education workers and drivers.
  • Four in five employers (82 per cent) had either no surplus workforce capacity, or such a small amount that they may need to hire more staff if demand increased.
  • Around half of hirers highlighted using agency workers to manage uncertainty (47 per cent), and access to short-term skills (51 per cent), as important reasons to use temporary agency workers.
  • Four in five (83 per cent) employers highlighted that the geographical and/or skills sourcing expertise of an agency was an important criterion when selecting their recruitment agency partners.

JobsOutlook is produced by the REC in partnership with ComRes. ComRes interviewed 600 UK employers involved in hiring by telephone between 11 December 2018 and 21 February 2019. Data were weighted to be representative of UK adults in employment by region, broad industry sector and public/private split. ComRes is a member of the British Polling Council and abides by its rules.

 

AI To Create 2.3 million Jobs By 2020
March 19, 2019
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Artificial Intelligence (AI) is slowly taking over our day-to-day lives – especially when it comes to the workplace and using tech to enhance and fast-track tasks writes Alesandra  Berger.

There are many sectors in which AI can help improve services – specifically national health services, banking and legal  services.

Not only do some of the biggest names in technology debate over the future of AI, and how it continues to make life easier and better for many, but we are now seeing some of the biggest tech companies recruiting heavily in AI.

But, who is recruiting for AI roles the most whilst making big steps in looking toward the future?

With AI-related jobs more than doubling over the past three years and job postings related to AI increasing by 119%, RS Components has analysed job posts from some of the world’s biggest tech companies to discover who has the highest percentage of AI-related job openings.

A former Google Exec has predicted that AI will replace 40 per cent of jobs in the next 15 years. Kai-Fu Lee stated that AI will allow entire new industries to be built from the ground up, with automation in mind. AI will be cheaper than human employees, however, it will also create new roles, as well as replace current ones.

As AI progresses beyond development stages and into regular usage, more and more companies are looking to recruit machine learning talent, develop the AI skills of their existing workforce, and begin to use the technology throughout various sectors of their business.

However in a Ernst & Young poll last year, 56% of senior AI professionals argued that lack of talent and qualified workers is the greatest single barrier to the implementation of AI across business operations.

Similarly, the 2018 survey by O’Reilly named ‘How Companies Are Putting AI to Work Through Deep Learning also revealed that the AI skills gap is the largest barrier to AI adoption, but that company culture, company resources and data challenges also contribute to this.

Our academic and training programmes are also struggling to keep up with the pace of innovation and development of AI, further widening the existing gap. But whilst recent research found that only 1 in 4 workers strongly agree that their company equips employees with the skills needed to take advantage of AI, it is suggested that advanced technical education might not be necessary to bridge this gap.

So how can you get ahead and help close the AI skills gap many workplaces are currently experiencing? And how might future career training initiatives be affected by this skill gap?

AI is expected to create 2.3 million jobs by 2020, with job titles such as machine learning engineer, computer vision engineer and data scientist being amongst the most in-demand AI jobs. According to research by Indeed, the most in-demand AI skills include machine learning, Python, R programming, data science, Java programming, and data mining.

These skills, which are currently in significant shortage, beg the question – will the curricula need to change to prepare children for the future workforce?

A recent report by Raconteur describes how Miles Berry, a key architect of the national curriculum for computing, introduced to replace ICT four years ago, is disheartened at how few schools have exploited the new programme fully.

“AI is difficult to teach and schools either lack relevant resources or don’t know how to apply them, but in order to plug the technology skills gap, we must give our youngsters time to experiment with creating rudimentary chatbots for example,” Miles says.

Whilst growing numbers of primary and secondary schools are now teaching students how to code, this only covers one small element of AI, and a skill which is predicted to be “old hat” by the time they’re old enough to enter the workforce.

One way to increase the AI skills gap would be to continue to increase resources for digital, math and technical education in schools – as a sole focus on driving more students in to computer science will not solve the issue.

Devising technology-specific education or training schemes will also help develop the skills of the future workforce. For example, last year the Massachusetts Institute of Technology announced plans to have an AI-focused college built by 2022.

Closer to home, tech giants such as Amazon have an AI-focused lab near the University of Cambridge and there are plans to build a technology University in Milton Keynes which will “focus on skills for the future” by 2023.

The University will be designed as an education institution for the 21st century, delivering a STEM- focused curriculum in key areas including digital, cybe, autonomy, robotics and AI.

Until there are new graduates with the appropriate level of AI skills to step into these roles, many companies should currently be focusing on upskilling and retraining present staff. The future of work will require employees to be ever-more agile and change their skills to keep up with technology, which is constantly developing.

Alexandra Berger, Senior Vice President, Marketing & Communications EMEA region, RS Components

About Alexandra: With over 18 years’ experience across an international business-to-business environment, working for companies including Unilever, SC Johnson, SealedAir and Rexel, Alexandra’s experience includes global, regional and country leadership roles in Marketing and Business Management.  Alexandra’s broad experience has seen her lead digital transformation programmes, brand development initiatives and customer experience programmes. Most recently Alexandra joined RS Components as Senior Vice President, Marketing & Communications for the company’s EMEA region, where she is leading the transformation of the marketing function. RS Components is the trading brand of Electrocomponents plc, the global distributor for engineers. Supporting & inspiring generations of engineers since 1937.

8 Entry Level Jobs in Industries You Might Not Have Heard Of
March 12, 2019
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With influencers, YouTubers and Artificial Intelligence drastically switching up the career landscapes, there’s no end to the amount of jobs currently available that haven’t been before.

1. AI Ex­pert8 entry level jobs in industries you might not have heard of

Entry level role: IT Support Technician

From voice assistants and chatbots, to smart home devices and robot nannies (yes, really!), AI is reshaping our modern lives and the world as we know it. Scary or exciting?

Either way, artificial intelligence is fast becoming a popular degree choice, and as demands for revolutionary technology increase – and we become more dependent on smart devices – so too will careers in this dynamic field. As a result, AI and machine learning experts will play an increasingly important role in the future of our digital world. Watch this space.

Routes in: You could either start work with a technology, data or AI firm, as a support technician for example, after doing GCSEs or A levels. Alternatively, a higher or degree apprenticeship in IT would point you in the direction, as it means you could continue studying for further qualifications in the industry while also being paid. Read more

New National Recruitment Campaign Aims to get People into Caring Role
February 14, 2019
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The Every Day is Different campaign, launched on 12 February 2019, features a new website giving lots of information about the wide range of career options available in the adult social care sector.

It also links to a job finder page to help anyone looking for work to find vacancies in their area.Carer dancing with old person

Read More Here

Care Leaver Internship Scheme – Civil Service Jobs – GOV.UK
September 12, 2018
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The Care Leavers Internship Scheme supports the cross-government Keep on Caring strategy.

Logo order to apply to the Care Leaver Internship Scheme you must have been eligible for a leaving care support package when you left care.

In order to qualify for leaving care support, you must have been in care for a minimum of 13 weeks, some of which must have been after your 16th birthday’. You must also be aged between 18 and 30 by 1st November 2018 and have the right to work in the UK. If you apply for a Care Leaver Internship and are invited to interview, you will need to provide evidence that you meet the essential criteria by showing a letter from the local authority that provided your care prior to interview and appropriate ID.

Locations

Read more

Civil Service Fast Stream Careers
August 29, 2018
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The Civil Service Fast Stream will open for applications at noon on Thursday 20 September 2018 at www.faststream.gov.uk.

The graduate programme is currently ranked No.2 in the times Top 100 Graduate Employers.

If you have clients interested in applying to the Fast Stream, they are warmly invited to do some window shopping on the website, ahead of applications opening.

They will be able to see which of the 15 schemes can best support their progression into a rewarding career and pre-register their details ahead of the application window. Read more

National Careers Service Promotes Summer Jobs
August 7, 2018
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There are currently over 28,000 Jobs on the DWP Find A Job website including “summer” or “seasonal” vacancies. Search Here

 

 

Support For Employers to Promote the 50+ Workforce in the North East
July 16, 2018
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The government has launched a programme, “Retrain, regain, retain – a pilot to support employers and the older workforce.”

The Department for Work and Pensions, in partnership with the North East Local Enterprise Partnership and the National Careers Service (NCS), is offering an opportunity to engage with a range of local businesses to explore how the NCS could provide individuals with better careers and skills advice, and how this might have an impact on the retention, retraining and recruitment workers aged 50 and over.

Benefits of the pilot

Employers that participate will have free access to: Read more

Summer Seasonal Jobs
May 23, 2018
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Use the following link to share with clients the opportunities for summer seasonal jobs in Wales, around the UK and abroad.

Summer Seasonal Jobs

 

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