New Report on the Value of Volunteering in Education
December 17, 2020
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Education and Employers logo

The following was published by Education and Employers.

We are publishing a new report entitled The Value of Volunteering – volunteering in education and productivity in work’.

The report will be launched at a webinar on the 8th January. Register now.

New report on the value of volunteering in education

Education Volunteering – ‘one of the best investments employers can make’

The new research, in collaboration with CIPD, reveals the positive value that organisations can realise by supporting their staff to undertake volunteering in the UK’s schools and colleges.

The report’s findings show significant benefits of educational volunteering, including improved communication and influencing skills; an improved sense of mission and loyalty at work; and greater staff productivity. These organisational benefits sit alongside the personal benefits realised by individuals themselves, with evidence showing volunteering can improve staff well-being.

And the volunteers surveyed felt that they made a difference to young people. This tallies with research Education and Employers has done with young people over the last ten years which shows that encounters with volunteers from the world of work helps to: Improve academic attainment at GCSE, Increase young people’s earning potential; Broaden young peoples’ horizons and raise their aspirations; Excite children about subjects, increasing motivation, confidence and attitude to learning; Challenge gender and social stereotypes; and reduce the likelihood of young people becoming NEET.

The webinar will begin with the unveiling of the main findings, and will be followed by a panel Q&A session with contributions from:

  • Peter Cheese – Chief Executive of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development
  • Justin Placide – Assistant Director – Business, Investment & Growth at the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy and Co-Chair of the Civil Service Race Forum
  • Karen Giles – Headteacher of Barham Primary School and Education and Employers’ Trustee
  • Natasha Davies – National Senior Programme Lead – Volunteering at Health Education England

We hope you can join us for this special event at the start of the New Year – which has got to be better than this one!

Register for the event

Free T Level Professional Development Courses

by Education and Training Foundation (ETF)

Responding to feedback from the Further Education (FE) and Training sector, the Education and Training Foundation (@E_T_Foundation) has refined its broad range of fully-funded #TLevel Professional Development (TLPD) courses to best suit practitioners’ needs.

The ETF has listened to the sector’s concerns over time constraints in the current climate and has tailored the list of CPD available before Christmas by postponing a number of courses to a time that better suits practitioners’ needs.

The refined list of CPD can be accessed and booked via the T Level Professional Development Platform, with key dates listed below.

Online modules and live online courses, delivered by a trainer, are aimed at colleagues in different roles across the FE sector. This includes established and new teachers, leaders, governors and business support staff.

For teachers, the Teaching T Levels: Professional and Vocational Upskilling course will update and maintain vocational and professional practice, knowledge and skills. It provides background information about how T Levels have been designed, and how developing vocational expertise can align to organisational, regional and national priorities.

The Teaching T Levels: Enhancing Pedagogy course, meanwhile, will develop teachers’ wider understanding of effective pedagogy. It includes examples of effective teaching and learning theory and practice in technical and vocational contexts. Both courses are carried out across two sessions on dates in December (listed at the end of this article).

Those involved in delivering the Education and Childcare T Level – including teachers, trainers and support staff managers – are invited to join the Curriculum Design and Delivery Network meeting which will take place online on 30 November (2pm to 4pm). The meeting is one of many taking place across the different TLPD Networks, which facilitate collaboration, the sharing of resources and the development of collaborative partnerships. A workshop on 25 November (2pm-4pm), will take place live online aimed specifically at colleagues with an interest in the marketing of T Levels. The workshop will focus on raising the local profile of T Levels for successful recruitment.

The New Teacher Programme – aimed at new teachers with no formal training – supports the rapid development of basic teaching skills that will provide the knowledge and confidence necessary to improve teaching practice in preparation for T Level delivery. It introduces key concepts, developing an understanding of the ways in which students learn, how to support the breadth of the learner cohort found in technical education, and appropriate strategies and learning methods. The programme can be undertaken online, over three themed modules, or delivered live online by a trainer over the course of two sessions.

For Operational Middle Leaders and Managers, two online modules address leading and managing curriculum change for T Levels, as well as leadership and professional practice for T Level planning and implementation. Courses are delivered live online by a trainer during December (dates listed at the end of this article).

The Strategic Leaders Providing T Levels course is for senior leaders already, or considering, delivering T Levels. It will help them understand the impact T Levels will have within their organisation and across their wider community, looking at considerations for effective employer partnerships, organisational change and how T Levels are resourced effectively and positioned in the curriculum offer. There is an online course available, bookable via the TLPD Platform, as well as three two-hour sessions on 4, 11 and 18 December.

Understanding T Levels for the Post-16 Sector introduces T Levels and wider technical education policy, providing useful information for those in a range of roles about the changes they will need to make as T Levels are rolled out. Live online events aimed specifically at frontline staff and business support staff, are bookable now (dates below).

Each of these activities can be accessed by registering on the ETF’s T Level Professional Development Platform for FE providers and their staff. Registration is free, fast and easy, you can create your account by visiting the Platform. Where an online (flexible) course is available in your chosen subject, we recommend you undertake this prior to attending a live online event.

Full details of the ETF’s T Level Professional Development offer can be found on the TLPD section of the ETF website.

Upcoming CPD dates (live online events) before Christmas

Teaching T Levels:

  • 9 and 16 December: Enhancing Pedagogy, 3:00pm – 5:00pm
  • 15 and 17 December: Enhancing Pedagogy, 2:00pm – 4:00pm
  • 14 and 16 December: Professional and Vocational Upskilling, 11:00am – 1:00pm

New Teacher Programme:

  • 15 and 17 December: New Teacher Programme, 9:30am-11:30am and 2:00pm – 4:00pm

Operational Middle Leaders and Managers:

  • 8 December: Designing the T Level curriculum: theory into practice, 1:30pm – 4:30pm
  • 9 December: Working with employers: co-designing the T Level curriculum, putting it into practice, 3:00pm – 6:00pm

Strategic Leaders:

  • 4, 11, 18 December: Strategic Leaders Providing T Levels, 3:00pm – 5:00pm

Understanding T Levels:

  • 3 December: Understanding T Levels – Frontline Staff, 10:00am – 3:30pm
  • 16 December: Understanding T Levels – Business Support Staff, 10:00am – 3:30pm

Networks:

  • 23 November: Network for Schools, 3:30pm – 5:30pm
  • 25 November: Marketing Network, 2:00pm – 4:00pm
  • 25 November: Curriculum Design and Delivery Network: Education and Childcare, 10:00am – 2:00pm
  • 27 November: Curriculum Design and Delivery Network: Digital, 10:00am – 12:00pm
  • 30 November: Curriculum Design and Delivery Network: Education and Childcare, 2:00pm – 4:00pm
  • 17 December: Industry Placements Network: 10:00am – 12:00pm

Free webinar: How to Find the Right Debt Solution for Everyone
With guest speaker Gareth McNab, Nationwide Building Society 

Wednesday 11 November10:30 – 11:30

In today’s economic climate falling into debt is perilously easy, getting out is hard. Firms in the debt sector have adopted flexible and ethical collection practices to support families who are struggling, yet costs and the time taken to collect have increased.

Whether you’re a collection agency, utility company, advice organisation, local authority or housing provider, you’re on the frontline for helping people in debt.

You can boost the financial resilience of households by helping them to increase their income. In this way, you can increase collection rates and social impact, in the knowledge that you’re doing the right thing.

Join this webinar to hear:

How COVID-19 has already hit people’s incomes, and what’s in store
Who the newly vulnerable households are
How to reduce existing arrears and the chance of a customer falling into arrears
How to minimise the cost of debt collection
Register now
Zoom
October 14, 2020
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Starting a Classs

● If it’s your first time using Zoom, visit the Educating Guide: Getting Started on Zoom and complete the steps in advance of your class to get you set up.

● Schedule your class in the Zoom application for your desired date/time and copy the invitation details to send to your students.

*Please note that students will not need to register for an account to join.

● Join your class a couple minutes early to ensure a proper connection then follow the below tips for a quality online learning experience.

Tips and Tricks for Virtual Lessons

● For your first class, set aside some time to introduce your students to Zoom and ensure that they’re able to connect their audio and video.

● Give an agenda or plan for each class by Screen Sharing a document or slide at the beginning of class. This gives students a clear idea of how the class will progress, what will be covered, and the activities they’ll engage in.

● Discuss online etiquette and expectations of the students in your first virtual class and periodically revisit the topics.

● Utilize the Whiteboard or Annotate a shared document and let your students engage as well. When sharing a whiteboard, document, screen, or image, try whiteboarding math problems or have a student use annotation to highlight items such as grammar mistakes in a paper you’re sharing.

● Take time to promote questions, comments, and reactions from your class. Give a minute to allow your students to utilize reactions, write their questions in chat, or be unmuted to ask their questions live.

● Divide into smaller groups for a discussion on a certain topic. You can use Zoom’s Breakout Room feature to either pre-assign or auto-assign students into groups for a short period of time so they may discuss things together.

● Have students be the presenter and share projects with the class. This allows your students to show what they’re working on while practicing their presentation skills. It also allows students to hear from one another.

Teaching Over Video – Delivery Tips and Tricks

● Pre-set your meeting to mute participant’s microphones upon entry. This helps to avoid background noise and allow your students to focus on your lesson.

● Look at the camera to create eye contact with your students. This helps to create a more personal connection while teaching over video.

● Take a second to check chat or your student’s video (if on camera) to check-in with your students and get feedback.

● Speak as if you’re face-to-face with the class while ensuring you’re at the appropriate distance from the microphone for the best audio experience.

● When delivering a presentation, sharing images, files or video, give your students a moment to open or take in what you’ve shared.

● Embrace the pause. Take a moment after the end of your comments and allow for students to engage before continuing on.

Great Tools Built into Zoom for Engagement

● Polling: https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/articles/213756303-Polling-for-Meetings

● Breakout Rooms: https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/articles/206476093-Getting-Started-with-Breakout-Rooms

● Non-verbal Feedback: https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/articles/115001286183-Nonverbal-Feedback-During-Meetings

● Virtual Backgrounds: https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/articles/210707503-Virtual-Background

● Sharing a Screen: https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/articles/201362153-How-Do-I-Share-My-Screen-

● Whiteboard: https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/articles/205677665-Sharing-a-whiteboard

● Annotation: https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/articles/115005706806-Using-annotation-tools-on-a-shared-screenor-whiteboard

● Transcription of meetings: https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/articles/115004794983-Automatically-Transcribe-Cloud-Recordings-

● Chat: https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/articles/203650445-In-Meeting-Chat

Additional Resources

● Outschool, a marketplace for live online classes, has made available Free Remote Teacher Training Webinars showing how to adapt teaching practices and curriculum to a live video chat classroom. These webinars are led by Outschool’s experienced teachers who have transitioned from in-person to online teaching. Educators can sign up and find available times/dates here: https://success.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_Twxi9n0qQ5WwdtWOxy6JHQ

CareerWise Canada: Working with Mature Clients

An article by TANYA MYKHAYLYCHENKO

This article covers several challenges mature workers face and how career pros can address them.

Career professionals have a broad range of tools for success when working with mature clients who have been in full-time management or administrative roles for 10+ years with the same employer.

Many of these workers are dedicated professionals who were known and respected in their recent workplace for their strong knowledge of the organization and its processes. Often you can hear them say, “I don’t know how to put this on the resume, but I just get things done. I’m very reliable.”

Mature workers who have not had to look for work in several years need help understanding ATS, networking, follow-up and ways of articulating their professional differentiators. The added challenges of post-COVID hiring may include higher competition, more agile businesses and more reliance on technology. In the current climate, mature workers may also need some assistance with highlighting their technical skills and their ability to work remotely.

Understanding the Agile, Contingent Workforce of Today

Competition is high, many roles are temporary, and businesses are trying to be agile and save resources. COVID-19 is introducing new remote ways to do business, use more technologies and delegate tasks to workers (in any location) who can be productive in a remote setting.

If your client was used to stability and long-term employment in their previous organization, they may first consider acknowledging the current situation to position themselves as a candidate who offers both stability and adaptability.

To support mature workers:

  • Prepare them to leverage their experience and years of dedication to previous employers while expressing their adaptability to most recent changes in hiring.
    • They can speed up their hiring process by being highly articulate about their measurable results, technical skills and soft skills – the combination that makes them stand out.
  • Train them to highlight their hard skills as well as demonstrate confidence, competence, resilience and strong communication. A candidate with a calm, executive presence is seen as a reliable employee able to handle challenges.
  • Articulate their value for them: focus on their ability to build consensus at all levels of the organization while listening to employer’s needs and solving problems.
  • Help your client identify their top 3-5 differentiators that make them competitive.
    • You may recommend that they write down a list of their top 10-15 strengths and pick 3-5 from this list when applying for a specific role.
    • You can help them adopt a positive attitude of sharing, in concise terms, their unique professional value with a focus on employer’s needs.
    • You can emphasize the necessity to research a target company, follow up, reach the hiring manager and build their LinkedIn network.

Understanding the Achievement-Based Resume Structure

As with all other applicants, mature workers may focus too much on job duties in their resumes.

To support your clients:

  • Explain how the resume logic evolved with a focus on readability (documents must be easy to skim) and measurable results (‘problem – action – result’ format).
  • Train mature workers to think in terms of how they solve problems and what outcomes they deliver (vs. process and experience).
  • Ask specific questions or develop questionnaires to help them articulate results.
  • Encourage them to prepare for interviews following the same achievement-based approach and think in terms of how they can help employers save money, make money, improve operations or address difficulties.

Understanding Current Job Application Cycles

Submitting a resume alone is not enough. Many mature workers may favour a resume spray approach where they send applications to 50+ open positions online, without prior knowledge of companies. Help them understand a job search strategy as a more focused, yet varied effort.

To support your clients:

  • Help them inform their immediate network (service providers, community organizations, extended family, former colleagues or clients, religious, sports or recreational affiliations, etc.) that they are looking for a new role.
  • Encourage your clients to create a list of 20 target employers and research them, follow them on social media, identify decision-makers and connect with them on LinkedIn.
  • Provide your clients with examples of networking messages that are brief, clear and authentic.
  • Help your clients understand the full cycle of the job application process:
    • customizing the application for each specific role
    • following up
    • networking online
    • building relationships while interviewing (for future opportunities)
    • “closing the sale” after in-person interviews with some form of 30-60-90-day plan or a list of their action items for the first month if they were to be hired.
  • Inspire your clients to be proactive at every stage of the application vs. waiting for a response. Help them understand that an online job application puts them in the pool of 100-200 other applicants and an interview invitation puts them in a pool of 2-6 other competitions. What will they do to keep standing out?

Throughout the process of working with mature workers, remind yourself of where they are coming from and how this informs their current motivation, approaches or challenges. By showing your understanding and acknowledgement of their current state, you can help them adopt new ways of looking for work faster, while finding the best approach for each individual.


TANYA MYKHAYLYCHENKO

Tanya Mykhaylychenko is a resume writer with a background in university teaching and IT staffing. She is a member of Editors Canada and Career Professionals of Canada.

ViewPoint: Careers Advisers – Are We Ready for the New Normal?
August 26, 2020
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By Sarfraz Ahmed, Careers Advisors, Leicester College

Since March 2020, the vast majority of career services, and providers such as schools, colleges and universities transferred all their services to providing a service remotely.

© Sarfraz Ahmed, August 2020 - Member of the Careers Writers Association

For our own health and safety, the vast majority of us worked from home.

Through the combination use of:

  • Telephone Guidance
  • Video Chat
  • Live Streams
  • E-guidance
  • Social Media

In the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic, all of us have had to rethink the way we work and engage with our customers, Although this has meant a shift in the way that we engage with our customers, it has been a positive in the sense that many of us have had to embrace technology such as using Zoom, Microsoft Teams, using Streamyard for Live Streams.

Personally, whilst in lockdown, I’ve had the opportunity to record my first podcast and been a guest on local radio in Leicester and nationally as well. Telephone guidance has been successful for providing advice especially to support Educational, Healthcare Plans (EHCP) reviews, and has allowed the College Careers Team to effectively support the work of Additional Support Managers to effectively provide progression for students from their current course.

Live streaming has taken Careers Advisers and placed them in front of a ‘live’ audience albeit through a variety of social media platforms. This has for many taken away from the traditional method of delivery and has taken them out of their comfort zones. Live streaming can be daunting, as not only are you seeing yourself on a screen for the first time, but your advice and the way that you give that advice is immortalised online, and available on a variety of platforms such as Facebook Live and YouTube. Live stream content can be readily accessed time and time again, locally, nationally and internationally, as with any careers activity, preparation and practise is essential something that is crucial for a success live stream.

Another activity that careers advisers have engaged in is blogging, whether its physically writing articles or ‘blogs’ or creating ‘video blogs’ or podcasts. I personally find these a fun way to engage with an audience, and often practitioners point of view will provide real life context that may support an academic piece of research. Lockdown and working from home has given rise to engaging in webinars, within a week I could be engaging in at least four or five webinars a week. These were provided by universities, colleges, careers publications and websites.

I particular found the webinars from Youth Employment UK, Career Pilot, Amazing Apprenticeships, DMH Associates and EMSI particular useful and informative. Engaging with other professionals can make you feel that you are part of wider collective, especially we are all in the ‘same boat’, and a lot of the issues and concerns we had were similar. Often these webinars led to further debate and discussion on sites such as LinkedIn, as shared our thoughts, articles and findings and collectively we supported each other online.

Now three months on, the ideas of going back to work in the office can appear to be a very daunting thought to say the least

Talking to career professionals there are many areas of concern. First and foremost safety and protection for both themselves and those that they serve, whether or the use of screens and Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) such as masks, gloves and hand sanitisers will be enough to adequate protection. Will social distancing be feasible within a careers setting such as in interview rooms and in offices where we provide 1:1 careers guidance, interview rooms will have to ventilated and not crowded and be able to provide adequate protection, this includes spaces such as classrooms and group work settings. Large assemblies and events will have to take account health and safety issues and in many cases will have to be re-thought.

There clearly needs to be a more flexible approach to working, as the last few months have shown that many career services can be run successfully remotely. This could include a more staggered return to the office allowing some staff to work from home, so that staff is not in the office at the same time, ensuring that social distancing guidelines are met.

In the past few months many of us have embraced technology, especially the use of Microsoft Teams to have meetings with colleagues, to contact students, to conduct video interviews, and deliver group work sessions online. This shift for many has been challenging and a huge learning curve as prior to the lockdown very few of us used Microsoft Teams or any other similar technology.

I feel a ‘blended approach’ is crucial for a safe return to going back to work, although working from home can still be maintained to a certain extent. Travelling to and from work and to other venues are also issues for many career advisers as safety could be also be an issue on public transport. For those working in schools, colleges and universities, there is still a concern of potential risk of having large number people gathered in one place and how this will be managed and maintained.

The recent upsurge of interest in career guidance as well as the government’s commitment has meant that the government will be looking to increase the number of advisers to help address issues of unemployment and misplacement as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. As such we do not know how this will be tackled and indeed if there enough advisers to meet the demand, we will have to wait and see.

Many careers professionals have been concerned about the level of pay and its inconsistency across the board. Career advisers in schools and colleges are yet to be paid a wage that is reflects their level 6 minimum level of qualification, (equivalent to degree Level) and many have additional postgraduate qualifications and higher as well as the constant research and training necessary to keep up to date, especially in times of change, this has been evident in the recent pandemic crisis.

In recent times due a shift in policy which has led to a downsizing of services such as Connexions, meant many Careers Advisers have had to refocus and retrain and as such the profession has lost a lot of talented and dedicated advisers, through a barrage of pay cuts, redundancies and a loss of opportunity to progress in their own careers. Clearly these underlying issues will still need to be addressed if the is a demand for careers advisers in the future.

Why careers guidance is more important than ever

Interesting enough Sir John Holman’s recent blog entitled “Why careers guidance is more important than ever”, published on the Association of Colleges (AoC) website (10 July 2020), highlighting the need for good careers guidance, especially in the current climate.

He also emphasised that careers guidance needs to be a priority in schools and colleges, and that careers guidance needs to be taken seriously and that commitment needs to come from the top through Career Leads, ensuring that “careers is being embedded across the curriculum”.

He felt that “Colleges are critical for protecting those vulnerable students in their community who have most to lose as the jobs market goes through turbulent change. As job opportunities disappear, new ones will appear, and good career guidance can steer students towards them.

Recent governments guidelines in terms of the Gatsby Benchmarks (2014), and the Careers Strategy (2017), will still have to be adhered to, however Careers Services and Advisers may need to rethink the way there guidance is delivered in a post Covid world.

As careers resources may need to be adapted traditional guidance techniques for a new generation, using new technology to deliver to groups, and to perhaps adopt a more ‘blended’ approach, through the use of live streams, and uploading content onto readily accessible platforms such as Facebook Live and YouTube.

In preparing for the new normal, our services and our practises will need to be flexible and adapts to ensure that we operate in a safe environment that helps to meet the needs of our customers more than ever.

10 Principles for Effectively Leading Group Career Counselling Online

During the pandemic, many career practitioners have been asked to provide the same services to groups, but online.

This has been the new normal for some career professionals and jobseekers, but it has also brought challenges. The biggest struggle is that there are few resources they can take advantage of in order to effectively transition from leading groups in person to online.

Here are 10 basic principles career practitioners should be aware of when transitioning to leading a group online from in-person facilitation to create well-designed and smooth sessions.

1. Be authentic

Leading groups online is not entirely different from facilitating in person. Take a breath, and remind yourself what skills you can bring to the table: compassion, patience, resiliency, sense of humour, mastery of the content. Whether you are familiar with the group nor not, what you know about group dynamics from in-person experiences is still true. There might be tensions within a group or people might have different learning styles and motivations. Just be yourself and try to make a connection with group members as much as possible.

2. Learn and practise the technology

Test whichever technology you are using in advance. The simplest tool should be chosen based on the size of your group. You should offer your help to group members in case of any technical difficulties. As you gain experience, new tools can be added to your toolbox.

3. Mitigate group members’ multitasking

Group members on screens may jump from window to window to search the web, play music or respond to messages. The temptation and likelihood of participants getting distracted or multitasking is significantly higher than when you are in person. Set expectations about minimizing distractions before your session through emails or reminder posts. You can sometimes use the distractions to engage participants, for instance by having group members text answers or giving them time to do online research during a discussion.

4. Engage frequently and in varied ways

Prioritizing engagement is crucial when you lead a group online. The best way to keep people engaged is to ask questions, switch up activities apart from discussions and have people journal. Adding elements of fun may encourage people to focus more. Secondly, group leaders should be mindful of varying how they prompt discussion. For example, don’t always ask yes/no chat questions. For best results, use a variety of engagement types that work for different communication styles and learning styles, and give people options.

5. Manage the energy of group members

The duration of group sessions should be scheduled for not more than two hours. Otherwise, it will be exhausting for both leaders and participants. Break for 10-15 minutes after one hour so people can get fresh air or attend to any pressing needs.

6. Honour people’s emotional state during a crisis time

You may find people in your sessions tired, angry, impatient or stressed over life challenges. Every group member usually brings their emotional state into their sessions. Even if group leaders don’t feel well-equipped to handle strong emotions, they can:

  • Create space for people to acknowledge emotions they have
  • Create a culture of checking in
  • Model grace and patience
  • Provide frequent breaks
7. Track participation

A common challenge in leading online is that we end up in a one-way conversation. Reading people online is more challenging than in person but it is not impossible. Thankfully, there are some strategies:

  • Include polls or spectrums to gauge responses
  • Ask general check-in questions
  • Review activity between sections
  • Check in with people on the phone before or after sessions (especially for tech difficulties)
8. Let people know you “see” them

The more seen people feel, the more they are likely to engage. They are also more likely to send you clear non-verbal signals when they know that someone is looking back through their screen. Here are a few examples for prompts that can let participants know that you see them:

  • “It looks like only about half the group has shared ideas in the chat box. If anyone is having trouble with the chat, let us know, or you can share out loud.”
  • “I see a lot of heads down on the web cameras, so I’m going to give you a little more time to journal.”
  • “Everyone has shared except [name] and [name], who are joining by phone. Would you like to share, too?”
9. Be aware of technology challenges

Marginalized groups often tend to participate less frequently. This can become compounded by technology. Technological challenges may hamper their confidence. They may be afraid of being shamed by other groups members or revealing a lack of knowledge or resources. Group leaders should make sure all people – no matter their technological difficulty – can participate fully. Facilitators should try to always provide alternative options for participation to help group members engage in the session.

10. Release yourself and your group from the standard of perfection

Group leaders should be wary of the challenges of leading group online. They should prepare themselves for bumps on the road. The most important thing is to be calm and do your best when faced with challenges. The second-most important thing is to stay connected with group members in a sincere and compassionate way. Let’s model patience and caring with wisdom and intention.


AYDOLU SIMSEK is a post-graduate student in the Career Development Practitioner Program at George Brown College. She previously had 10 years of HR background in her home country. She has a strong desire to learn the intricacies of helping individuals navigate through career exploration and the world of work. Aydolu is a graduate of sociology and has a master’s in business administration.

dmhassociates: LiveCareerChat@Lockdown No 5
Title: The Career Development Landscape: Evidence and Impact Assessment
Date:
7th September 2020
Time:
2.15pm – 3.15pm (UK time)

Presenters:

Chris Percy (Senior Associate)
Dr Deirdre Hughes OBE (Director, dmh associates)
This free webinar session:
-examines key concepts, challenges and opportunities in relation to evidence and impact assessment in careers work;
-introduces a brief ‘how to approach’ for impact assessment with some examples from youth and adult evaluations;
-explores contemporary developments within the UK, European and international career development landscape; and
-provides an opportunity to identify new and emerging approaches to evidence and impact assessment within a Covid-19 context.

The webinar is limited to 500 delegates, so register your place quickly so you do not miss out.  Places will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. Hope you are able to join us!
 
Any queries: email ADMN@dmhassociates.org
Register for the webinar
AbilityNet: Free Webinar: Accessibility Insights with Atos – 11 August 2020
AbilityNet is delighted to be welcoming accessibility royalty, Neil Milliken of Atos, as the second guest in our new Accessibility Insights bitesize webinar series.
Neil will be interviewed by Robin Christopherson, Head of Digital Inclusion at AbilityNet.

Neil is Global Head of Accessibility for Atos. His role is to deliver better technology for customers and employees, embedding inclusive practice into the processes of the organisation, which has thousands of employees and an annual turnover of billions.

In addition, Neil is the Atos representative on the Business Disability Forum Technology Task Force, and an expert for the W3C Cognitive Accessibility Taskforce. And there’s more…Neil is co-founder of AXSChat, Europe’s largest twitter chat with a focus on Accessibility & Inclusion.

Neil was also named in the top ten of the Shaw Trust Disability Power 100 list in 2018, and Disability & Inclusion practitioner of the year in the 2019 Disability Smart Awards.

They hope you’ll be able to join tham on 11 August for this 30 minute webinar on all things accessibility, starting at 1pm BST.
Register now for our Accessibility Insights webinar with Neil Milliken
6 Ways to Get Your Job Search Back on Track

An article by Elaine Mead and published by the Australian Careers Service.

After a few months stuck at home, half the world is either just beginning to return to normal (and the office) or they’ve been left wondering what comes next after experiencing job losses. 

Losing a job or part of your professional identity can be a shock to the system. Know you are not alone in this experience. When you’re ready to take the next step forward, there’s plenty of ways to do so. 

It’s going to take a while for recruitment to pick up again and we’re certainly going to face a few more challenges as we deal with the impact of COVID-19. Making a plan for finding work might seem like a mammoth task. 

The small things can quickly become the building blocks of bigger changes and help you feel empowered rather than trapped during this time. Aside from updating your resume and cover letter, here are six to get you started: 

1. Update your LinkedIn profile 

If it’s been a while since you looked at your LinkedIn profile, now is the perfect time for some updates. You can set your profile to ‘actively seeking opportunities’ to indicate to potential employers and recruiters you’re looking for work and follow companies for job openings as soon as they happen. Spend some time making sure all your job titles are up to date, remove anything outdated and include links to projects or resources that align with your work or professional identity.  

2. Expand your knowledge 

Learning professional skills is a lifelong hobby and a great way to kick start your own development journey if it’s been a while since you studied. If you’re seeking ways to feel in-control and proactive about your career, an online course or workshop could be just the thing you need. Whether you want something to help you in your current industry or you’re seeking to strike out in a new direction entirely, there’s something for everyone. 

3. Check-in with your network 

Networking might seem like a foreign concept in our current climates, but it’s not completely off the table. Are you involved with any professional associations for your industry? Many are offering free professional development workshops, as well as regular Zoom meetings simply giving members a chance to chat and discuss how COVID has been impacting their industry and day-to-day jobs. It’s a great way to feel less alone but also connect with some new faces. 

4. Set up a professional website 

If unemployment is on the books, setting up a digital space that contains your resume, write-ups of any projects and programs you’ve helped on, as well as a weekly blog on your own thoughts about your industry could be what sets you apart when job hunting. Consider this a portfolio where you get to showcase your in-depth knowledge and understanding of your work and include the link to your site on your resume. It’s a great way to invite employers to get to know you better. 

5. Create some ‘how-to’ guides 

Lots of people every day are looking for ways to simplify their workday or understand how to do something quickly and easily. If you’ve got some niche knowledge, creating a how-to guide is a great way to boost your professional identity. Identify common question-points in your day-to-day job or industry and do a write-up — you might even visit a few of your own gaps and write about those! Share online (either LinkedIn or your website) and invite others to share their input. 

6. Start a business book club 

There are books for every single industry imaginable, or you could pick a broader topic such as leadership, workplace culture, or emotional intelligence in the office. You can read alone or rope in a few other colleagues or industry peers to read along with you. It’s a different way of adding to your personal knowledge and growing as a professional. 

Elaine Mead  is a Careers and Work-Integrated Learning Educator based in Tasmania.