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6 Ways to Make your Online Meetings More Efficient
June 22, 2020
0

Microsoft 365 Team

When was the last time you had an in-person meeting? Let’s face it: no matter if you are working for a small business or a large company, today’s work rendezvous are becoming increasingly more electronic. While  online or virtual meetings  can be convenient, they also detract from participant accountability by providing more room to lose people’s attention. When people are distracted, meetings lose focus and require more time for repetition.

To keep your meetings—and your schedule—on track, consider these six tips and transform your routine.

1. Agenda action—Whether your meeting participants are located across the building or the world, it’s important to get everyone on the same page. While formal agendas may not be as in vogue as they once were, reinstate the practice. Include the meeting’s topics in the body of your calendar invite or email out a document 24-48 hours before the designated time of your teleconference. This will provide all parties with the chance to set their expectations regarding the meeting goals. And yes—if you’re the recipient of a meeting agenda, read it! Even if you’re familiar with the project or discussion topics, you may learn important information about the perspectives or concerns on the table, and it’s never fun being blindsided.

2. Prep your (Ps and) Qs—Whether your meeting or teleconference has a set agenda or not, make sure you know what your goals are. Before the meeting, compile any notes or background information you may need to reference as well as any questions. Having a prepared list or set of bullet points will relieve the pressure of thinking of any questions on the spot as well as allowing you to engage with the discussion at hand. Feel free to jot down questions on the agenda if there is one, or set up your notes document ahead of time with initial goals or thoughts at the top. No matter your preparation style, following this preparation practice will ensure you’re reminded of your own agenda the day of the meeting.

3. Troubleshoot your tech—Whether it’s your first online meeting or your millionth, make sure you know how to use your technology. Confirm how to dial in and that your speakers work. If you need internet to access your conference or your (meeting-related) email or notes, check that Wi-Fi! Initial frustrations often develop when that one person needs one more minute to access the conference line. Don’t be that cause—get to your conference room early and dial in. Even if you set your phone to mute until other people join, at least you can focus on the content of your talk rather than getting there in the first place.

4. Sharing is caring—If you are reviewing any information with accompanying visuals or statistics or if you’re referencing external documents, make sure everyone can follow along. Set up a screen share so that you can direct your audience’s attention and keep everyone on the same page. This step may alleviate the “Wait! Where are we?” questions as well as the “Hold on, I have to get to the right page.” Sharing your screen eliminates the need for those pauses and moments of confusion. Just remember: if you’re sharing your screen, make sure to turn off any email, phone or messaging programs or notifications to avoid any uncomfortable announcements. 

5. Be direct—One of the challenges of online meetings is knowing who is about to speak or who needs to jump in. Based on the meeting participants and their personalities, virtual meetings can range on the spectrum of everyone talking over each other to long pauses after someone’s finished speaking. To avoid indistinct vocal jumbles or empty air time, frame questions specifically to other meeting participants. If people are working together or relying on other steps in the process to move forward, don’t be afraid to ask them specifically if they have anything to add or additional questions. By being direct with turning the conversation, you’ll ensure that you’ve maximized meeting time while allowing everyone to be heard.

6. Personality perks—Online, phone or virtual meetings can be a drag—you don’t have body language to read how people are responding or whether they’re following along. To remedy the possibility of losing people’s focus, keep your personality primed. Be as personable as you would be in person—or more so, as the meeting requires. High energy will engage your audience and keep them tuned in to the topics at hand. They wouldn’t want to lose track, especially if you have a habit of asking people directly how they respond to a point. With everyone involved at the top of their meeting game, your meeting points will be addressed quickly, and you’ll cover more material in less time. 

No matter the meeting format, there’s no need to get lost in the virtual shuffle. By being prepared and engaging your colleagues, your meetings will be clear and on target with your goals.

LiveCareerChat@Lockdown No 4
June 15, 2020
2
Title:
LiveCareerChat@Lockdown No 4 – Youth Transitions: Creating Pathways to Success

Date:
6th July 2020

Time:
3pm – 4pm (UK time)

Dr Anna Riggall, Head of Research, Educational Development Trust (EDT) England
Dr Deirdre Hughes OBE, Research Director, DMH Associates
Graeme Smith, Research and Evaluation Executive at Skills Development Scotland

This webinar presents new international research findings on youth transitions. Societies everywhere are undergoing a deep transformation. More than one in six young people have stopped working since the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic (ILO, May 2020) while those who remain employed have seen their working hours cut by 23 per cent.

“The pandemic is inflicting a triple shock on young people. Not only is it destroying their employment, but it is also disrupting education and training, and placing major obstacles in the way of those seeking to enter the labour market or to move between jobs.”

New youth policies and innovative practices will be essential to address a potential tsunami of youth unemployment and prolonged transitions from schooling to the world of work. We will present findings from a new international ‘think piece’ drawn from 105 research reports on school to work transitions – starting with career-related learning in primary schools and beyond, up to the age of 25 years old. 

The webinar is limited to 500 delegates, so register your place quickly so you do not miss out.  Places will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. Hope you are able to join us!
 
Any queries: email ADMN@dmhassociates.org
Register for the webinar
AoC Events & Webinars
June 5, 2020
0
Scheduled online events 

Click on the titles to find out more details and how to register. More details will be added daily so do please check back.

June

July

Previous Webinars

Coronavirus Communications Webinar

Online Forum – Home Learning: next steps post Easter (recorded 01.04.20)

College governance and COVID-19: sizing the problem and addressing the risk (03.04.20)

A level and GCSE summer assessments, 2020 implications for colleges (recorded 07.04.20)

Vocational and technical qualifications update (recorded 21.04.20)

AoC Apprenticeships in the Current Climate Webinar Recording (23.04.20)

AoC/Ofsted Sector Dialogue Webinar (23.04.20)

Webinar: Supporting SEND students both in mainstream and specialist provision (recording)

Webinar: How to manage centre and assessed ranking for GCSE and A Level’s (recorded 07.05.20)

Supporting Student Mental Health Remotely Webinar (recorded 12.05.20)

Managing Positive Industrial Relations Webinar (recorded 19.05.20)

How to manage centre assessment vocational and technical qualifications webinar (recorded 22.05.20)

Cashflow and Solvency Webinar (recorded 22.05.20)

Finance series –  Webinar 1: Setting 2020-1 budgets 

ViewPoint: Careers Support at a Distance: The New Normal for University Careers Services
June 3, 2020
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BY CAREERSCHAP

It’s often said that absence makes the heart grow fonder and in these exceptionally challenging times I’d imagine we are all missing parts of our former routines and lives.  But unpredictable and profound changes can also provide us with opportunities to adapt in the new normal.

 In my own role as a Careers Consultant in the higher education sector I wanted to focus in on the essential shift of careers services to an online delivery model and the resources that have emerged to support both practitioners and students.  For pioneers like the Open University providing online support sits very much as business as usual but for some careers services the move from a campus to online only model of support has been a paradigm shift in a very short space of time. 

So what does online careers support look like?

The first point I’d like to make here is that it’s easy to fall into the trap in viewing online delivery as merely a set of tools e.g. email, telephone, forum, webinars, webchat, social networks and any other one-to-many and many-to-many platform.  Crucially this misses the context of how technology and the internet is so intertwined in many of our lives.  Having moved from a previous careers role three years ago that largely offered campus based face-to-face support to one now that is 100% online delivery was certainly a culture shock but I have to say one that has proved to be exciting and enlightening.

Reflecting on my own pre-covid experiences with other careers practitioners at events and conferences I found there was a diverse range of involvement and confidence levels in online careers service delivery.  Some careers services have had an established blended service offer for some time whilst for others, online delivery was minimal and ancillary to the norm of face-to-face campus-based delivery.

So, what has been incredible and heartening to witness is the extent that university careers services have responded to the Covid-19 crisis by rapidly shifting their support to an online model, being there to support students in these difficult times.  There’s a really great piece in WONKE Supporting student careers in challenging times, on how the sector has responded.  Key tactics have included supporting students in the jobs market with online workshops,  virtual careers fairs, online assessment centre support and strengthening careers resources that speak to different groups of students at different stages in their student journey.

How sharing intelligence and resources has helped.

Both AGCAS and the CDI have also responded rapidly to the needs of careers professionals to help keep us up to date in developments such as labour market information, sharing best practice, resource development and establishing channels of communication to stakeholders. 

The ISE has produced a steady stream of research and news updates about the impact of the crisis on student recruitment and employers.  Prospects has also shared regular labour market updates and articles on  the human impact about how COVID-19 has affected career opportunities.  Platforms such as NextStepSupport.org (an open collaboration between a number of organisations that provide support and services to students and recent graduates) have been launched. New podcasts have emerged chronicling (and sharing good advice) the impact on lives and careers whilst platforms such as OpenLearn have been instrumental in sharing free content such as the recently launched (and very timely) MSE’s Academy of Money.  

What will the new normal be like for careers services?

The conversation has now moved into how universities will reopen with Cambridge the first to announce the decision that all face to face lectures will be moved online until the summer of 2021.

Whilst there is uncertainty how other universities will follow suit and which courses they can meaningfully transfer online I wanted to think about what this may mean for careers services?

For many, an online curiosity has turned into an online reality.  Some unintended consequences may well have emerged.  We are in the midst of a rapid advance towards the digitisation of careers services that goes beyond just technological tools but a change in mindset towards the value of online careers support.  This has the benefit of equality of access for students with no or limited campus access e.g. students enrolled on online courses, or in the workplace through apprenticeships) and students with health and wellbeing needs that had made campus access difficult.  Neurodiverse students for example may well prefer not to access large group face-to-face environments and so can benefit from new technologies and have real choice. 

My predictions for careers services and practitioners. 

Technology can remove campus restrictions of time, space and place and careers practitioners are increasingly finding themselves woven into the same online social fabric as the students they want to support.  Practice may not have kept pace with online innovations and a purely online world of careers support is likely to highlight skills gaps that takes time to identify and bridge.

When some normality takes shape there will be an acknowledgement of what the early adopters have come to realise.  That online careers support can provide increased scale and reach to serve a wider range of students and that guidance at a distance whether by telephone, skype, email, webinar or social channels can be impactful and valued by students.  The new normal doesn’t have to be about what we’ve all lost but also about what else we have gained.  This makes it even more critical that rapid adoption is supported by evidence-based approaches, staff CPD and sharing of best practice. 

Questions Managers Should Ask Remote Employees
May 18, 2020
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As more employees are working from home or spending days on the road visiting learners and employers, how do you ensure you have the right conversation that homes in on issues that are often unspoken?

Here are 11 questions that you can use to create better dynamics with your remote employees, faster.  Ask these questions when you first start working with any remote employee, or at regular intervals (e.g., every half year), to check in on changes. 

1. What do you like best and least about working remotely?  

Follow-on questions: 

  • What is the high point of a typical day (for example, yesterday)? 
  • What is the low point of a typical day (for example, yesterday)? 

What this question uncovers

Motivation analysis: This question helps you find out what motivates and demotivates your direct reports. Learn more by asking for more context on comments. For example, if they say ‘my high point is getting into a flow state with a project.’  Ask: ‘what creates a flow state for you?’

2. What is your work setup like?  

Follow-on questions:

  • What equipment or process improvements would make things 10% better? 
  • What technology issues have you encountered? 

What this question uncovers

Environment analysis: This question helps you listen for ways to optimize setup and workflow. While doing so, you can also arrange for your remote employee to interview other remote employees from cross-functional departments to learn their setup tips. 

3. What is your daily routine? 

Follow-on questions

  • What do you do to take breaks/ recharge? 
  • Are you able to fully disconnect when on vacation or at the end of the day? 

What this question uncovers

Energy management: Listen for spots to help optimize time boundaries. A big danger for remote employees is burnout since work and life are blended. When working in-person at the office it’s easier to have delineated boundaries for starting and stopping work. 

4. What has your experience been with working remotely in the past? 

Follow-on questions: 

  • What were some challenges in your previous setups?
  • What were some of the learnings you had? 

What this question uncovers

Level of support needed: There is a presumption that working remotely is easy – one simply does what one would normally do, but at a different location. This isn’t true. What we’ve found in our research is that working remotely requires a unique skill set that gets honed with time, including over-communication, clarifying expectations, assertiveness, proactivity, and more. Asking about prior experience with remote work helps you gauge your direct report’s skillsets and determine if more guidance or training is needed to set them up well for success.

5. What challenges do you feel remote workers have compared to those in the office? 

Follow-on questions: 

  • What could make things easier?
  • What benefits/advantages do remote workers have compared to those in the office? 

What this question uncovers

Perception/fairness markers: The human brain is wired to track comparisons between conditions, including in this case in-person vs. remote dynamics. Sometimes remote employees feel more is happening at the office than really is (e.g., team meetings that they are not a part of, benefits they miss out on, etc.). This question helps you surface unspoken issues and re-set expectations if there is a feeling of misbalance. This includes a conversation around perks. The downside of working remotely is getting access to things free snacks or onsite company celebrations, etc, but the positive trade is flexibility, autonomy, no need for a commute, etc.

6. Would you say our meetings are remote-friendly? 

Follow-on questions: 

  • Can you hear and see well? 
  • On a scale from 1-10, how easy is it for you to contribute during a meeting? 

What this question uncovers

Meetings culture: Team meetings are often harder on folks who are dialing in, yet easy to optimize. This question will help you hear, from your remote employee’s perspective, small optimization ideas. As an example, one easy hack LifeLabs Learning has found to quickly improve perceived meeting quality (PMQ) is to have each person in the in-person meeting dial in using their laptop and laptop camera and a jabra mic for the room. With this, all people in the in-person room can speak to each other like normal, but the remote person can see a close-up view of each person who is speaking. 

7. Who do you connect with most often at work? 

Follow-on questions:

  • Which coworkers or departments do you wish you had more connection with? 
  • Who do you go to when you need support or have process suggestions or improvement ideas?

What this question uncovers

Support network: When working remotely, it is harder to make connections, yet an essential brain craving for all humans is to feel like we belong. Asking ‘who do you connect with most often’ and the follow on questions helps you realize if your direct report needs help building out their network. Creating relationship capital for your direct report is easy: you can link them to other people doing similar work, find ways to make their work more visible by creating demos, or set them up for informational interviews with relevant departments. 

8. How do you feel about how often you visit the office? 

Follow-on questions: 

  • Is this the right amount or would you like it to be more or less often? 
  • When you meet with other teammates, do you/ they turn your camera on? 

What this question uncovers

Belonging: This question helps you uncover how your direct report feels about the amount of contact they get and allows you to explain decision criteria around in-person gatherings. Having the right amount of in-person time matters when working from afar. Our research shows that ‘frequency beats length’ when it comes to having contact. What this means is that flying a direct report in for in-person time is important, but having cameras on in order to see each other frequently is even more important.

9. What are some things your prior managers did that you liked? 

Follow-on questions: 

  • What’s something you didn’t like? 
  • What’s something I could do 10% better? 

What this question uncovers

Managerial relationship: This question helps you understand how to work best with your employee. It opens feedback lines by normalizing that your team cares about optimizing work dynamics. It also helps you improve one-on-one meetings for the future. 

10. How consistent are our information systems? 

Follow-on questions: 

  • Which apps do you most use in your daily workflow? When do you use Slack, text, Jira, etc.? When do you feel confused about which systems to use? 
  • Where are we consistent/inconsistent as a team?

What this question uncovers

Communication systems: When working remotely, it is particularly important to know which medium to use for which type of information. This question helps assess confusion spots in the system. 

11. What do you want to learn more about regarding our team or company? 

Follow-on questions: 

  • Has any news surprised you recently? 
  • How included do you feel in team decisions? 

What this question uncovers

Information flow: When working remotely, people sometimes feel out of the loop. This question helps you hear if they feel or are excluded. You can then optimize systems or explain the context.

Article first produced by LifeLabs Learning: LifeLabs provides training for managers, execs, and teams, with a focus on rapid skill acquisition and tipping points: the skills that make the most difference in the workplace. 

How to Help Your Clients Ace a Virtual Job Interview
May 15, 2020
0

Job interviews done by video, for example, using Skype, are becoming more common.

You need to prepare for virtual interviews differently than you would for normal face-to-face interviews.

Plan where you’ll do the interview

Choose a quiet place with no distractions, and use a computer or laptop computer with a webcam and good internet connection.

A business-woman doing a video job interview
  • Have a plain background that won’t distract your interviewer.
  • Dress like you would for a ‘normal’ interview.
  • Sit comfortably.
Get used to talking to someone using a computer
  • Practice talking to the webcam, not the people on-screen, so you’re more likely to be looking your interviewer in the eye.
  • It’s OK to look at the screen when you’re listening.
  • Try using a headset – it might keep you from talking too loudly or quietly.
Body language is important

Body language is important in virtual interviews.

If you look off to the side of the computer or fidget, it will stand out to your interviewer.

  • Be upbeat and smile during the interview.
  • Try not to slouch in your seat.
  • Keep your hands down, you may even want to rest them in your lap.
The advantage of a virtual interview

Your interviewer won’t be able to see any helpful notes you stick to the edge of your screen.

You can stick a few things on there, as long as your body language and eye contact aren’t affected too badly. A note could:

  • remind you to smile or talk more slowly
  • be a question you want to ask at the end of the interview.
Do a test run

Ask a friend to help do a test run a day or two before the interview.

That way, you can check how you look, sort out any technical issues that come up and generally make sure things go smoothly.

  • Use an account name that’s professional and easy to remember such as your first initial and last name.
  • Make sure your background and face are well-lit so the interviewer can see you clearly.
  • Make sure your picture isn’t shaky.
Change and Transition Curve
May 14, 2020
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Originally presented at the Tenth International Personal Construct Congress, Berlin, 1999, and subsequently developed in his work on constructivist theory in relation to service provision organisations at Leicester University, England, John Fisher’s model of personal change – The Transition Curve – is an excellent analysis of how individuals deal with personal change.

This model is an extremely useful reference for individuals dealing with personal change and for managers and organizations helping staff to deal with personal change. 

Overcoming Communication Barriers: Attitude

The attitude of both the sender and the receiver can act as a major obstacle in the communication process.

However, it is not always possible to be aware of all of these influences as they are heavily reliant on personal characteristics. 

Some of the principal barriers here include:

  • relationship between communicators 
  • personal belief and perception 
  • culture 
  • status 
  • emotionality 

Relationships

Messages are more easily understood when both the sender and receiver can empathise with each other, as well as with what is being said. Personal attributes can be involved here, some of which cannot be altered, such as gender, race or physique; but all can influence behaviour, and reactions to the behaviour of others. Attitudes can also create barriers – people have a tendency not to listen to others who have a different viewpoint from their own.

The ability to empathise with someone else may not be easy and the relationship between the people involved in any communication process may form a barrier to the effectiveness of communication. If the relationship is good, communication is more likely to succeed.

Personal Belief and Perception

The biases that people have developed during their lifetimes may distort the messages they receive. People are affected by previous experiences, attitudes, values and feelings and all of these can influence the messages being communicated. It is human nature to evaluate others based on these personal attitudes, but this can have a negative effect on communication and cause some aspects of the message to become lost in the transmission. Stereotyping is a significant barrier to communication. It typifies people so that they are dealt with quickly, without any effort as they are regarded as part of a homogenous group with identical traits. Stereotyping is dangerous because it causes people to act as though they already know the message that is coming from the sender. Judgements are made about who is communicating the message, rather than the message itself and the receiver automatically becomes less objective.

Culture

Culture and geography can create obstacles to effective communication. Very often, words or phrases from different parts of the world, or even different parts of the same country, can have different meanings. Non-verbal communication such as body language or gestures can also have different meanings. An example of these variances can be seen in the different interpretations of head shaking. In western societies this means no, while head nodding means yes. To many traditional Greeks and Middle Easterners, an upward head nod means no.

Status

If the person communicating is regarded as an authority on a particular subject, understanding is increased as more credence is attached to what is being communicated. More attention tends to be paid if the person communicating the message is in a position of superiority, e.g. if someone is listening to a speaker, attention will automatically be greater if the listener has admiration and respect for that speaker.

Emotionality

When the sender displays high levels of emotion, the receiver can become distracted. If too much attention is paid to the emotional message being conveyed, important information such as factual information may not be understood. On the other hand, the receiver may completely ignore the emotional message and concentrate on the factual information instead. In both cases, the message is distorted because the entire message is not being absorbed.

Overcoming Mental Barriers

How to develop empathy with the person you are communicating with:

  • Put yourself in their place and try to see yourself through their eyes to understand their point of view. 
  • Listen actively and objectively to the message, not the person communicating the message. 
  • Take time to learn about various cultures and become more familiar with the cultures of people you are regularly communicating with. 
  • Realise that a person’s status can affect the message you perceive. Just because they are in a position of authority, it does not necessarily follow that what they are communicating is correct. 
  • Be aware that a person’s emotional state when either sending or receiving messages can unconsciously affect how the messages are transmitted and can affect how others interpret the message sent. 

It may not always be possible to completely control mental barriers, but even awareness of their existence by the sender or the receiver can help to ensure the smooth flow of communication.

5 Cs of Body Language
May 11, 2020
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If you see a person with arms folded, does this mean they are feeling defensive, with their arms acting as a barrier? Or could this mean they are feeling superior and are making a judgement? Or are they just feeling relaxed and placing their arms in a comfortable position? 

The answer is ‘It depends’. Interpreting body language means much more than just looking up the current body shape in a definitive list. Here is a simple set of five points that offer a critical lens to help see and interpret body language and other non-verbal communication in a more realistic way. 

Cues 

When we act, this is not done as a stand-alone thing. We do and say things in response to what others do and say. These external events act as cues (or ‘triggers’) that stimulate internal responses. 

When you see someone with a particular body shape, a good question to ask is hence ‘What just happened that may have led to the possible interpretations of their body language, and which is most likely?’ 

Cues can also be internal, for example where thoughts and concerns lead to changes in body position. You hence may also ask ‘Given their body language, what might they be thinking or feeling?’ 

Cues are a key part of conditioning, where emotions and actions are paired with a cue such that the appearance of the cue triggers a set of feelings and, possibly, related action (which the person may try to suppress). This cue-response sequence can also be instinctive, such as the way that wriggly creatures trigger a fear-and-recoil response. 

Changes 

A very important thing to watch for is transitions, where body language changes, for example from open to closed formation, or where a person suddenly scratches their nose (both of which may indicate discomfort). 

When you see a change in body language, look backwards for cues that may have triggered the transition, for example where someone suspected of lying is asked a revealing question looks away. 

Sales people watch for changes in body language, such as leaning forward and positive responses to subtle cues, as indicators of customers becoming convinced. The sales person will then use this understanding as a signal to move to the next stage in closing the deal. 

Clusters 

While body language changes can appear as single events, such as folding of arms, they often appear as a group of different movements that occur together or one after another. For example, a person may shift their stance, cross their arms, lean backwards slightly, purse their lips and frown, all as a combined indication of disagreement. 

Clusters of body shifts send clear signals when they all indicate the same thing. This may happen where each has a similar meaning, or where the whole ensemble of movements combine for a single meaning. 

Sometimes, cluster movements contradict one another, for example where a person rubs their nose (indicating possible deceit) and smiles. The resultant mixed message will likely cause you to feel uncomfortable and it makes sense to always be vigilant for such gut feelings, then look for reasons why you may feel this way. 

Character 

A further general factor that can confound and yet can also explain much is the general character of the other person. A person who is more extraverted, for example, may display frequent and large body movements, while a more introverted person might use more concise gestures. 

It easy to confuse these personality traits for others such as exhibitionism and timidity. In seeking to classify others (and hence predict their actions) we often misinterpret limited body signals and thereafter filter what we see through these incorrect mental models. 

Temperament, mood and even shorter-term emotions can also act as modifiers that affect body language and make it more difficult to interpret. Yet if you can determine a person’s current emotional state, you may apply this knowledge in your interpretation and so gain a better understanding of what their movements really mean. 

Context 

The final factor to consider when reading body language is the broader context that may influence how the other person thinks, feels and acts. 

What is going on in the immediate environment can have a clear effect, for example when young men are in the presence of attractive young women, they will indulge more in preening, posturing and other mate-attracting moves. 

The wider context of a person’s life also has an effect on their body language, typically indicating anxieties, excitement and other musings and anticipation. If you have no knowledge about such modifiers, this can have a confounding effect on your attempts to interpret their body language.

Hints & Tips: Maintaining Your Professional Online Presence

By Elaine Mead

Elaine Mead

In the past five years, we’ve seen the rise of the creative resume, digital CVs and the increasing need to have an online presence. You might even hear people refer to a person as a ‘brand’. Statements like ‘what’s your digital brand?’ and ‘how are you propositioning yourself in the digital job market?’ are not uncommon. 

Whether you’re currently looking for a new job or are happily employed, it’s advisable to do a professional digital detox at some stage. Having a strong professional presence online can help with not only with securing a new role, but aid in securing promotions too.

Here are some tips to consider for maintaining your professional online presence: 

Do a Privacy Checkup 

It’s more than okay to have a personal life separate from your work life — just have a think about what you want potential employers to see before making something personal public.

Be Consistent 

Make sure your resume reflects your digital profile (especially on LinkedIn) – job titles, companies, dates and projects should all be consistent, online and offline. Honesty is one of the highest-rated qualities that employers look for so don’t fall short by telling fibs at this stage.

Keep Your Goals in Mind 

Is your digital presence matching up with your real-life career goals? Make sure you’re engaged with the right content and websites for your industry and be sure to look for real-life opportunities such as networking events as well. Don’t just do anything and everything — make sure what you’re doing has the right impact and adds value to what you’re trying to achieve in the world of work. Employers will notice. 

Elaine Mead is a Careers and Work-Integrated Learning Educator based in Tasmania.