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15 Ways for Coachees to Get the Most From Coaching Sessions
January 8, 2020
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The nature of coaching is that it is a two-way process involving coach and client as equals; the more active a part you take in the process the better the outcomes are likely to be for you. Here are 15 practical ideas and suggestions to help you get the most from your coaching.

1. Remember it’s not the coach’s responsibility to solve your problems or achieve your goals for you 

The coach is there to support, challenge, listen, stimulate, encourage, share feedback and offer anything else they have in their tool kit to help you think better and plan well to make the changes that are important to you. Ultimately you are the one that has responsibility for your own work and life. This is why we encourage a model of active, adult-adult partnership in coaching rather than anything that suggests you are dependent on your coach.

2. It’s up to you to ask your coach to change the way they are coaching you if you feel they could coach you in a better way

Coaches are of course only human, and as such have their own distinct personalities: yet a good coach will be able to flex their style in many ways to suit you, e.g. by being more or less direct/challenging, by moving at a faster/slower pace or by sharing more or less of their thinking and ideas with you. They will be happy for you to make such requests because their aim is to coach as effectively as possible.

3. The coach’s job is to ask you for even more than you might normally ask of yourself

Your coach wants the best for you and for this reason will be looking to offer and encourage ‘stretch’ wherever possible. Your coach may well question the limits you set for yourself and encourage the setting of challenging goals and targets. Coaching should not be a ‘cosy club.’

4. The coach is your success partner, not an accountability service

Coaching will work best for you when you are actively seeking to get the best from yourself and when you take responsibility for your own growth and development.

5. The value of coaching isn’t based on how much time is spent coaching

The value of coaching depends on quality rather than quantity: when both you and your coach are fully engaged in the task and working hard then success should follow – it is a bit like going to the gym and really working at it, rather than thinking you will get results just by being there.

6. The coaching session in itself is not what gets you results

Ultimately this is down to what you do and how you act after the coaching – what you put into practice. Coaching is there to help you to plan and prepare to get the best out of what you are doing.

7. Talk about what matters most to you

You are not there to conform to any expectation you feel your coach may have on you – least of all are you there to please the coach in any way. Yours is the only agenda that counts and if it is important to you, your coach will work on it with you.

8. Focus on yourself

Sometimes clients worry that coaching is somewhat self-indulgent – even a selfish luxury. We offer the view that you can only effectively do your job or serve others well if you are yourself fulfilled, purposeful and operating to your fullest potential. When you succeed, others should benefit too: if you are unhappy, unfulfilled or frustrated in your work or blocked in some other way it is likely that others will not get the best from you. You can look at your coaching as a positive boost to the communities of which you are a part.

9. Be open to seeing things differently

Very frequently, the issues you face are not in themselves the real issues! Often it is the way we see issues and how we think about them that needs to change. Even when some of the issues we face are objectively daunting or difficult challenges, we can use coaching to open ourselves up to new ways of responding to them. Opening your thinking up will open up new possibilities for choice. Your coach can help you identify ways of seeing, thinking and responding that may offer you very different options and approaches.

10. You can develop and evolve with coaching

Coaching is both a developmental process and an evolutionary one. It helps clients accomplish more with less effort – the developmental aspect – and can also lead to different thinking and possibilities for growth and change – which we call evolving. Evolving is a skill worth building because life itself is about evolving, not just developing.

11. Use your coaching to help you think about – and design – the kinds of environments and systems you want to work in – you can go beyond yourself

We can all exercise some choice and responsibility in creating the kind of environment to allow ourselves to flourish. Even when your organisation places apparent restrictions in your way we can often exercise at least some discretion in the physical, social, professional and cultural contexts in which we work and live. Coaching encourages a whole-system approach and links personal change to the contexts we inhabit.

12. Take charge

You are invited to take charge of the coaching process, to get it focused on what you most want and need. We encourage you to come to each session with a direction in mind, perhaps a list of issues or questions you want to address. Ultimately the more you know what you want out of your coaching the better. Your coach can then work with you to craft really specific and relevant goals for the coaching.

13. Be Real – say what you think

When what we say does not reflect what we are really thinking, we are incongruent. Coaching is not an abstract exercise or an intellectual joust but an opportunity to work together with your coach in a climate of shared honesty and truth. When you are authentic it really helps to get the best out of your coach.

14. Promise what you can deliver

Whilst we encourage stretch and boldness in coaching we also ask you to be mindful of what is realist and doable in the context of everything you are trying to do. Overextension causes great anxiety, guilt and suffering. We encourage you to remain mindful of what you are realistically able to take on as a result of your coaching.

15. Share what you are doing with your coaching

People close to you will see and feel the effect your coaching is having, either directly or indirectly. For some people this will create questions and even anxieties about the changes you are making. We would suggest that where possible you are open to others about what you are trying to do via your coaching. This will have the double benefit of including them and reaffirming your commitment to developing as a person and a leader.

Free Resources from DMH Associates
December 20, 2019
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International Careers Development conference delegates were provided with access to our unique conference resources toolkit which contained copies of all presentation materials on the day and additional information provided by the many speakers and contributors.

This now available for you to download as your Christmas present from DMH Associates and gain the same material as the delegates.
Access your DMH Associates Toolkit Here
Careers Advice Toolkit
October 25, 2019
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WorldSkills UK and Youth Employment UK have published a new digital Careers Advice Toolkit. The comprehensive guide supports young people with employability and careers information they need for their futures. 

There are 19 lesson plans in total, covering Key Stage 3 and 4 all mapped against the Careers Development Institute and Gatsby Benchmark Frameworks.

Learners will be coached through their career journey, helped to identify their own motivators and skills, understand their career options and also the developmental tools and pathways available to them. 

The lessons can be delivered as bitesize pieces of content or as a whole career curriculum with video’s, quizzes and engaging activities to support the learner along their career journey.

It’s completely free to use. To access the Careers Advice Toolkit you need to complete a form giving your details – it can be accessed using the link below.

Click here 

NCW2020 Social Media Pack
September 18, 2019
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Here is everything you need to help promote #NCW2020 in your organisation. NCS has created a wide range of graphics you can use across all your Social Media platforms provided you follow the guidance in their information pack. You can download everything you need below:

What Works: Work Experience, Job Shadowing and Workplace Visits
August 21, 2019
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This paper summarises the research literature on three forms of work-related learning: work experience placements, job shadowing and workplace visits.

It draws together the available evidence on the effectiveness of these three activities and highlights lessons for good practice. This information may be used by schools, colleges and providers of work-related learning in order to support the programmes they deliver in these areas. 

https://www.teesvalleycareers.com/education/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2019/02/What-works-experience-of-works-Benchmark-6.pdf

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Career Change Toolkit
August 19, 2019
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Activities and advice to help your clients explore career options and make it happen!

This Toolkit will help your clients:

  • Work out whether it’s time for a career change 
  • Explore what it is they want to change
  • Think through options which match their strengths, interests and values
  • Consider alternatives to a complete career change
  • Work out how feasible a change would be and what is involved
  • Implement specific strategies to make it happen.

https://www.jobs.ac.uk/media/pdf/careers/resources/career-change-toolkit.pdf

Are You Prepared for Your Job Hunt?
August 13, 2019
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Ask your clients to answer the following 10 questions to discover how ready they are for job hunting.

Are You Prepared For Your Job Hunt?

If you’re well prepared, it makes it easier to apply for your dream job when you see it.

Answer the following 10 quesitons to discover how ready you are for your job hunt.

The 10 Questions

Is your answer yes or no?

  1. My CV is up-to-date.
  2. Someone has proofread my CV.
  3. I know how to write a good cover letter.
  4. I have documents like my qualification certificates, references etc.
  5. I have an up-to-date LinkedIn account.
  6. I have suitable interview clothes.
  7. I know the best way to answer typical interview questions.
  8. I’m happy with what employers can see on my social media accounts.
  9. I make time to search for and apply for jobs.
  10. I’ve told people I know that I’m looking for a new job.

Your Results

If you have answered ‘no’ to any of these 10 questions then talk to your Job Coach to get the help and guidance you need so you can answer a positive ”YES” to them all!

Employer Guide to Apprenticeships
August 9, 2019
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Career Kickstart Reviews Guide
July 26, 2019
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The TUC has produced a guide for their Union Learning Reps (ULRs) to help them work with young people to support them develop career plans through career kickstart reviews.

While the guide is aimed at ULRs the information it contains will be of value to anyone involved in the provision of information, advice and guidance.

Kickstart reviews are designed to provide support to young people, start a conversation with them about their career plans and give them the best possible start to their career.

Career kickstart reviews provide a range of benefits. Young people will be able to:

  • identify transferable skill think about potential career pathways
  • build confidence and motivation
  • consider progression opportunities and the support needed to get on at work.

Union learning reps (ULRs) and union reps will be able to:

  • reach those young people who have had little careers advice
  • help young people develop confidence in making decisions
  • encourage them to become active union members.

Employers will benefit from the increased motivation of staff, employees with higher skills, and reduced staff turnover.

This guide provides support and resources for ULRs and other union reps to deliver career kickstart reviews. It offers:

  • underpinning knowledge
  • contextual information
  • the basic theory behind IAG
  • a suggested structure for reviews
  • information on resources and signposting.

Use the link below to download the guide:

https://www.unionlearn.org.uk/sites/default/files/publication/Career%20Kickstart.pdf

Eight Free Career Assessment Tools to Help Your Clients Find Their Fit
July 11, 2019
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Whether your client is just starting out in their career, or ready to make a career change, career assessments can be a helpful tool to spark ideas and identify strengths. Here are eight free career assessments to help get you started.  

Charity Village Career Assessment Questionnaire 

This multidimensional assessment offers guiding questions for clients around job/career satisfaction, career path/options, attitude/motivation and the role of their family in career change/job search. It also offers definitions for terminology used in the assessment, which could be helpful for clients who are using it independently. 

Motivational Appraisal Personal Potential (MAPP) Career Assessment 

The MAPP test comprises 71 questions exploring likes and dislikes and is meant to be done quickly, taking approximately 22 minutes to complete. Users must register to take the free sample assessment. Paid packages are also available, which offer different assessments and career matching opportunities. 

Entrepreneurial Potential Self-assessment 

This questionnaire from the Business Development Bank of Canada has users rate a series of statements (e.g. “I want to build something that will be recognized publicly”) to help evaluate entrepreneurial traits in regard to their motivations, aptitudes and attitudes. It takes about 10 minutes to complete.  

Sokanu Career Test 

The Sokanu career test offers matches to more than 800 careers. It evaluates career fit based on interests, work history and goals, workplace preferences and personality. The full assessment takes about 20 minutes to complete. It can be used with a variety of age groups. 

Holland Code Career Test 

This career assessment is based on psychologist John Holland’s RIASEC model of career choice. It follows the theory that careers and people’s personalities and interests can be classified into six broad areas. This 60-question assessment generates a brief report outlining the assessment taker’s primary career interest area and a list of possible careers; a premium report is available for a fee. 

Career Interest Profiler 

Taking about 25 minutes to complete, this assessment from Testing Room measures six traits to help identify top career choices. A personalized, mini report comes free, but the 14-page full report is only available for a fee. Testing Room’s career planning assessments are developed by Psychometrics Canada. 

InSight™ Values / Work Characteristics Inventory 

The InSight assessment from CareerPerfect helps clients clarify and prioritize their values in relation to their working life. It evaluates responses in 10 categories, including structure and pace, challenge, environment and creativity. CareerPerfect also offers a Work Preference Inventory, a quick assessment of preferences in regard to work assignments. 

Career Cluster Interest Survey 

This assessment lets clients rate activities they enjoy, personal qualities and school subjects they like to discover career clusters that are a match for their interests. It takes five to 10 minutes and was created by CAREERwise Education.