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How to Decline a Job Offer Due to Salary
August 20, 2019
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Hints & Tips for Your Clients

When you’re interviewing for jobs, there’s a lot of pressure to land an interview and get that final job offer.

You want something that will help you pursue your passions while also being able to meet your bills and spend a little extra money on fun activities.

The right job for you is out there, but what happens when a job offer is given with a salary that’s lower than what you were expecting?

It’s hard to realize that you can’t take a job because it pays too little, especially if it’s a job you really want to do. The good news is that there’s strategy behind working with the salary that’s initially offered with the job. You don’t necessarily have to take the first number that’s given, and most employers know that people are going to negotiate.

Not sure how to decline a job offer due to salary? Have you ever negotiated a pay raise before you’ve even been given the job? Read on to learn how to do just that without needing to shut down a future with the company you want to work for.

With the right strategy, you can get your future employer to raise your pay to what you believe you should earn, without having to give up the offer and look for employment elsewhere.

Negotiate With Facts

If you have a lengthy history in the job you’ve been offered or valuable experience that qualifies you for the job, it’s time to put that to good use. Look over your work history and figure out what points are most important to why you should be paid a higher salary.

Make a list of those experiences. Maybe you led a team to a major milestone at your old job, have years of experience in what you do or have valuable ideas and game plans that will make you an important player in office culture.

After you make that list, write down what you earn now. What would your salary be in your current or previous job that would be equal to the skills you bring to the workplace?

You can base that improved salary on the average pay for your position in your industry. An employer will be more willing to work with a competitive rate than an outrageous one.

You should also take into consideration what you’ll need to do to start your new job. Will you have to move, and how far would that move be?

On average, people who move in the US pay $2,300-$4,300 to relocate. If your potential employer has already said they can’t cover the cost of your move, mention that an increased salary will help get you there.

Know When to Stop

Decide your minimum salary as soon as you can. It should be higher than what you earned in your last position, competitive with similar roles in your industry and able to cover the cost of living where your new job should be. If your potential employer continually insists that they pay what’s below your minimum salary, it’s time to stop negotiating.

Sometimes when you stop negotiations, it gives your potential employer time to step back and reconsider how they’re willing to meet you in the middle to get you on board. This could end up being just what you need to squeeze those few extra dollars into your salary, or it could be when both parties realize that things aren’t going to work out.

Written by Productivity Theory


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