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Redesigned RoATP to Open 12th Decmber 2018

The following article by Jude Burke was published by FE Week.

Almost a third of providers on the government’s register did not deliver any apprenticeships last year, FE Week analysis has revealed – the day before the redesignedRedesigned RoATP to open tomorrow despite no delivery from 1 in 3 approved providers register re-opens for applications.

There were 1,787 providers on the register of apprenticeship training providers in 2017, of whom 580 – or 32 per cent – had no starts by the end of 2017/18, based on year-end figures
 published by the Department for Education last week.

Of those, 506 were main providers, representing 32 per cent of the 1,587 on the register last year.

The proportion of employer providers not delivering was higher, at 37 per cent – or 74 out of 200.

The Education and Skills Funding Agency confirmed last month that the redesigned RoATP will reopen on December 12, and remain open indefinitely thereafter.

Under the new, stricter rules, first revealed by Keith Smith, the ESFA’s direct of apprenticeships (pictured above) in October, providers that go 12 months without any delivery are likely to be kicked off the register.

All providers will be asked to reapply, but Mr Smith said the agency would segment them into groups – with those deemed “high risk” being asked to re-apply first.

“We want to focus the re-application process on those providers that are potentially not delivering, and on those that we think will struggle to pass our new requirements,” he told the Association of Employment and Learning Providers autumn conference on October 30.

Other changes to the register include greater scrutiny of providers, who must have traded for at least 12 months and provide a full set of accounts before applying.

The DfE’s latest statistics include starts broken down by provider for the first time.

They reveal that colleges have been hit hardest by the move to levy funding, with a five percentage point drop in market share and a 35 per cent fall in starts – compared with a 24 per cent drop across the whole of the sector.

 

Apprenticeships Vital to Tackling Future of Work Challenges
December 3, 2018
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The following article was published in HR Magazine

Over three-quarters (78%) of businesses strongly believe that ‘earn-and-learn training’ can help address future workplace challenges, according to The 5% Club

Employer-members of The 5% Club were asked for their opinion on a number of challenges facing their sector and the role of apprenticeships and other earn-and-learn training.

All businesses surveyed agreed that on-the-job training can help companies prepare for the future by providing relevant skills, with 78% strongly agreeing. A majority (91%) said that earn-and-learn training could significantly help to address ongoing skills gaps.

A further 67% stated that earn-and-learn training, such as apprenticeships, is critical for upskilling an ageing workforce.

Penny Cobham, director general of The 5% Club, said that growth in AI, combined with an ageing population, spelled significant challenges for businesses.

“Over the next few years businesses will face unprecedented change. The increasing use of artificial intelligence data insight and other technological advances will become the expected norm for businesses in order to thrive and as such, we need to prepare our workforces accordingly,” she said. Read more

RoATP: Tougher Rules to Ensure High Quality Apprenticeships

The following article was written by the ESFA.

We have published new, tougher rules for providers and employers applying for and securing a place on the Register of Apprenticeship Training Providers (RoATP).

The strengthened approach will mean only ‎providers that meet the tougher registration requirements can access government funding. The‎ move follows a review of the RoATP, taking on board valuable feedback from provider representative bodies, providers and employers, and forms part of the Government’s continued commitment to improving the quality of apprenticeship training.

To secure a place on the RoATP, providers and employers must now prove they have actively traded for 12 months, are financially stable (evidenced by their financial information), skilled and are able to deliver quality apprenticeship training, before they apply, rather than when they begin delivery. The 3-month trading history requirement for supporting providers has been retained to enable new providers to build a delivery track record.

Acting on feedback from the sector, the register will open for applications on 12 December 2018 and will remain open throughout the year, with no closing date. This means providers can apply when they feel they are ready and can prove they have the appropriate capacity, capability and skills in place to meet the registers robust entry requirements. Two applications in a 12 month period will be allowed. ‎

ESFA is also considering the introduction of provider earnings limits and in the coming months, will be seeking views from the sector on these. The limits will ensure control, not just for quality reasons but the potential size Anne milton100x100and expansion of providers.

Anne Milton, Skills and Apprenticeship Minister said:

“Apprenticeships are giving people of all ages and background the chance to gain the skills they need to secure a good job and progress in their careers.

“It is vital that the training apprentices are receiving continues to be of the highest quality. Our new tougher approach builds on the robust checks already in place to provide even greater assurance that public money for apprenticeships is being used effectively.

“I would like to thank all those who took the time to respond to our review. Your feedback has been invaluable and has helped us to shape this new process.” Read more

Apprenticeship Pay Survey

It provides important information on training, hours and pay from current apprentices. The findings enable us to look at wage levels nationally, measure changes with previous years and monitor whether employers are adhering to the rules on fair pay. The research will help set pay policy and to make improvements in apprenticeship training.

IFF Research, an independent research organisation, will undertake the research on our behalf

The selected apprentices will receive a letter explaining the purpose of the research and who to contact if they have further questions. They are then interviewed by phone. Around 10,000 apprentices will take part in the phone interview which includes questions on: Read more

National Retraining Scheme For Adults: £100 Million In The Chancellor’s Budget
October 31, 2018
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The following article was written by Dr Deirdre Hughes OBE

The Chancellors’ Budget (October 2018) allocates £100 million for the first phase of the National Retraining Scheme (NRS).

This will include “a new careers guidance service with expert advice to help people identify work opportunities in their area, and state-of-the-art courses combining online learning with traditional classroom teaching to develop key transferable skills.”

I suspect this will focus on work with adults in the workplace. Lots of questions about how this might fit into the current careers landscape in England?

In 2012, the new all-age National Careers Service originally had a clear agenda to provide universal careers support services deep in local communities and businesses. The budget circa £105m was mostly for adult career guidance. Over the next three years, funding for area-based Prime Contractors working with priority groups is circa £45m.

Read more

AELP Press Release
October 9, 2018
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Association of Employment and Learning Providers

Press release – Monday 8 October 2018

Education Committee report on Apprenticeship

Government should adopt MPs’ recommendations on the apprenticeship reforms without delay

The recommendations in the Education Committee’s report, expertly steered by Robert Halfon MP, are to be warmly welcomed and the government should waste no time in implementing all of them, according to the Association of Employment and Learning Providers which represents providers that train 3 out of every 4 apprentices in England.

It is a pity that the excellent set of observations and recommendations may be overshadowed by media headlines of ‘poor quality training’, especially when Ofsted’s chief inspector has said herself that 80% of current apprentices are receiving good or outstanding training.  That said, every apprentice should be on at least a good programme and the Committee has hit the nail on the head when it identifies as a major issue the government’s letting into the apprenticeship market a mass of untested providers and assessors with few controls and limited monitoring. Read more

ViewPoint: New Approach to Funding Apprenticeships will Provide Better Value for Money
September 17, 2018
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A new approach to funding apprenticeships will provide better value for money so that people can benefit from the training opportunities on offer and progress in their careers, says Anne Milton writing in FE Week.

I have spoken a lot about the important changes we are making to improve the quality of apprenticeships in this country.

 One of the biggest changes has been to introduce apprenticeship standards – new, high-quality apprenticeships replacing the older “frameworks”. I’m really pleased that the number of people starting these apprenticeships has increased by almost 1,000 per cent in the last year. Of those starting apprenticeships only 2.5 per cent were on standards this time last year, and now it’s over 40 per cent.

Apprenticeship standards are designed by employers themselves. By putting employers in the driving seat, we make sure that apprentices receive the training they need and make sure people have the skills businesses are crying out for, so they can get on and grow their career.

Since its creation in April 2017, the Institute for Apprenticeships has been responsible for managing the development of these new apprenticeship standards. Their work includes advising me about the right funding level for each new standard that is approved.

Read more

The Swiss Secret to Jump-Starting Your Career in the USA
September 13, 2018
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This long article written by Dwyer Dunn and published in ‘The Atlantic’ explains how a youth-apprenticeship programme in Colorado aims to prepare students for the industries of the future by mirroring a successful model in Europe.

On a recent sunny summer morning, Ben Roueche pulled into the parking lot at the corporate headquarters of HomeAdvisor, in a suburban office park near Denver. Once inside, Roueche, wearing jeans and a T-shirt, sat down at a desk, logged on to his computer, and started resolving support tickets submitted by HomeAdvisor employees seeking help for everything from password resets to problems accessing the company’s internal phone system. At one point, Roueche paused to chat with his supervisor about establishing a setup procedure for a new video prototype that some executives will soon begin using Ben Roueche is 17; he just finished his junior year of high school.

For the past year, he has spent three days a week attending classes at a charter high school and two days a week working on the desktop-support team at HomeAdvisor. Earlier this summer, Roueche started working at HomeAdvisor three days a week, a schedule he’ll maintain throughout his senior year.

Roueche belongs to the inaugural class of apprentices in a Colorado program, started last summer, called CareerWise. It represents Colorado’s attempt to create an unusual, statewide youth-apprenticeship system.

“This program has more scale than almost any other broad apprenticeship that I know of,” Harry Holzer, a public-policy professor at Georgetown University, told me. Its goals are ambitious: CareerWise’s founders are trying to both prepare today’s youth for well-paid jobs in the industries of the future and to change a culture that insists every 18-year-old should graduate high school and go straight to college.

CareerWise is the brainchild of Noel Ginsburg, the founder of a Colorado-based advanced manufacturing company called Intertech Plastics. Ginsburg visited Switzerland, which has a widely admired youth-apprenticeship program, while serving as the chairman of the Denver Public Schools College and Career Pathways council.“What I didn’t expect is that apprenticeship isn’t just for construction—they have over 250 pathways there, everything from manufacturing to banking,” Ginsburg told me. “Seventy percent of kids there enroll in apprenticeships instead of going directly to college.

Read more

Grow Your Business with Apprentices – Latest Campaign
August 14, 2018
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For the latest campaign promoting Apprenticeships to employers Click Here.

It includes business case studies, details about the costs associated with training an apprentice and other resources.

AELP Respond to ESFA Announcement on Apprenticeship Service Transition

The Education and Skills Funding Agency announced on 9 August that all employers would not be able to use the apprenticeship service to access apprenticeship funding from April 2019 as previously planned. 

To ensure a more gradual and stable transition, the Agency will instead extend current contracts for training providers delivering training for employers that do not pay the apprenticeship levy
for 12 months, from April 2019 to March 2020.

Responding to this announcement, AELP chief policy officer Simon Ashworth said:

Read more

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