Avatar
Hello
Guest
Log In or Sign Up
£3 billion of Apprenticeship Funding Remains Unspent
February 12, 2019
0

New analysis from The Open University (6 Feb) suggests that UK businesses could be at risk of losing £3 billion in funding that could be used to increase skills and boost productivity.

Organisations have only drawn down 14 per cent of available funding from the apprenticeship levy – and from April the government will start to anything left over month by month, so The Open University is encouraging businesses to act now before they miss out on an opportunity to build skills they desperately need.

The data, secured by The Open University through a Freedom of Information Act request1, reveals that employers have earned back just £480 million of the total funding available since May 2017. So far, only one in five (19%) levy-paying employers have made apprenticeship commitments, with many reporting some kind of frustration with the scheme.

Additional market research undertaken by the University shows that the vast majority (94%) of employers are supportive of the apprenticeship levy in principle, but two in five (42%) would like to see changes to make the apprenticeship levy work more effectively for their organisation.   Read more

Learning Rep e-magazine – Spring 2019
February 7, 2019
0

In the latest edition of the Learning Rep e-magazine, you will find the followinghttps://gallery.mailchimp.com/ebd004a8047907dc47d269fd1/images/725917be-d84f-4ebe-8126-0c17c574dc51.jpg

  • Getting fighting fit with the FBU
  • Innovating with the ULF
  • Learning behind the wheels
  • Boosting migrant wellbeing
  • Pay check for apprentices
  • Value My Skills goes digital

To download the e-magazine, please click here.

ViewPoint by Anne Milton: We Must Encourage Schools to Promote Apprenticeships
February 6, 2019
0

Too many providers are still being blocked from going into schools to talk about apprenticeships, despite enthusiasm from both employers and young people about the rewards they reap, says Anne Milton.

We need to work together to tackle negative perceptions among teachers and parents

Top of the list of priorities for any minister for apprenticeships and skills must be making sure people know about, and can get access to, great further education and training — that’s the way to get a good job, go on to further training or progress your career.

At the start of the year, lots of people – particularly young people – will be starting to think about their futures. And as further education and training providers, you are all playing a vital role in this.

I have visited lots of businesses across the country and met and spoken to many fantastic and talented apprentices. What’s clear is that more and more people are recognising the life-changing benefits apprenticeships can bring. I have seen the enthusiasm among employers grow as they reap the rewards that apprentices are bringing to their workplaces.

Read more

Tackling Apprenticeship Gender Inequality by Unionlearn
February 4, 2019
0

Unionlearn has produced a number of publications to help reps support apprentices in the workplacehttps://gallery.mailchimp.com/ebd004a8047907dc47d269fd1/images/78a3472a-012b-48ba-929b-3af494da2d1a.jpg

The Tackling apprenticeship gender inequality guide looks into why trade unions and union reps should negotiate for gender equality in apprenticeship programmes. The guide offers good practice examples and practical advice on issues which are pertinent for women entering apprenticeships such as improving women’s participation in male-dominated industries, addressing the quality and flexibility of apprenticeship programmes and questions about health and safety and pay.

Tackling apprenticeships gender inequality is part of a series exploring supporting under-represented apprenticeship groups. The other guides in the series are Supporting Black and minority ethnic apprentices and Accessible apprenticeships.

To view the publications online visit:
www.unionlearn.org.uk/publications

£38 Million T Level Capital Fund Launches
January 30, 2019
0

The first further education providers to teach T Levels are set to benefit from a £38 million funding boost to help build new classrooms, refurbish buildings and upgrade their equipment in readiness to deliver the new qualifications from September 2020.

The T Level Capital Fund was announced by the Chancellor in the 2018 Budget. It is designed to make sure young people taking the new technical courses have access to industry standard equipment and high quality facilities so they gain the skills and knowledge employers demand.

T Levels will be the technical equivalent to A Levels, combining classroom theory, practical learning and an industry placement. The first T Level courses in education, construction and digital will be taught by over 50 further education and post-16 providers from September 2020.

The T Level Capital Fund will be delivered in two parts. From today (Thursday 30 January), eligible further education providers are being invited to bid for funding to refurbish their existing buildings or to build new spaces. Funding for specialist equipment such as digital and audio visual kit, will be allocated to all providers in spring 2020.

Apprenticeships and Skills Minster, Anne Milton said:

T Levels are a once in a generation opportunity to transform technical education in this country. They will give young people the opportunity to gain the skills they need to get a great job, go on to do a higher level apprenticeship or further study.

It will be vital that they have access to the latest, high quality equipment and state-of the art facilities during their studies. The T Level Capital Fund will help those further education providers at the forefront of delivering these important reforms to be ready to teach T Levels from September 2020.

To support the further education sector to deliver the new T Level programmes, the government will provide an additional half a billion pounds every year once they are all fully rolled out.

The government is also investing £20 million to help prepare the sector for the introduction of T Levels. This includes the £5 million Taking Teaching Further programme, which aims to attract more industry experts to work in the sector, and the £8 million T Level Professional Development offer to help teachers and staff prepare for the roll-out of the new qualifications.

In December 2018, the government announced the next 7 T Levels to be taught from 2021 as: Health; Healthcare Science; Science; Onsite Construction; Building Services Engineering; Digital Support and Services; and Digital Business Services.

Ofsted’s New Provider Monitoring Visits
January 18, 2019
0

Chris Jones, HMI, Specialist Adviser for Apprenticeships, on Ofsted’s new provider monitoring visits (8th January 2019)

Since April 2017, any provider wishing to train apprentices must be included on the register of apprenticeship training providers. We inspect all providers that receive apprenticeship funding from the Education & Skills Funding Agency or through the apprenticeship levy and that deliver apprenticeships at levels 2 to 5. A number of these providers are now eligible for inspection for the first time.

We usually inspect a new provider within 3 years of it beginning to deliver education and training programmes. But, because of the large volume of these new apprenticeship training providers and the potential risk to quality, Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, Amanda Spielman, announced in November 2017 that inspectors would carry out early monitoring visits to a sample of new apprenticeship providers. The Department for Education (DfE) has since provided additional funding to make sure that we have the resources to carry out monitoring visits to all these providers.

We will now be carrying out a monitoring visit to all newly funded apprenticeship training providers that have been delivering level 2 to 5 apprenticeships since April 2017. This visit will normally be within 24 months of their starting to deliver funded training. They will then have a full inspection normally within 24 months from when we publish their monitoring visit report.

By the end of November 2018, we had published more than 90 reports from monitoring visits to new providers.

Themes that inspectors look at

Monitoring visits for new providers are different to full and short inspections. They normally take place over 2 days. Inspectors do not cover all aspects of the inspection framework. Inspectors make progress judgements on 3 themes: Read more

Redesigned RoATP to Open 12th Decmber 2018

The following article by Jude Burke was published by FE Week.

Almost a third of providers on the government’s register did not deliver any apprenticeships last year, FE Week analysis has revealed – the day before the redesignedRedesigned RoATP to open tomorrow despite no delivery from 1 in 3 approved providers register re-opens for applications.

There were 1,787 providers on the register of apprenticeship training providers in 2017, of whom 580 – or 32 per cent – had no starts by the end of 2017/18, based on year-end figures
 published by the Department for Education last week.

Of those, 506 were main providers, representing 32 per cent of the 1,587 on the register last year.

The proportion of employer providers not delivering was higher, at 37 per cent – or 74 out of 200.

The Education and Skills Funding Agency confirmed last month that the redesigned RoATP will reopen on December 12, and remain open indefinitely thereafter.

Under the new, stricter rules, first revealed by Keith Smith, the ESFA’s direct of apprenticeships (pictured above) in October, providers that go 12 months without any delivery are likely to be kicked off the register.

All providers will be asked to reapply, but Mr Smith said the agency would segment them into groups – with those deemed “high risk” being asked to re-apply first.

“We want to focus the re-application process on those providers that are potentially not delivering, and on those that we think will struggle to pass our new requirements,” he told the Association of Employment and Learning Providers autumn conference on October 30.

Other changes to the register include greater scrutiny of providers, who must have traded for at least 12 months and provide a full set of accounts before applying.

The DfE’s latest statistics include starts broken down by provider for the first time.

They reveal that colleges have been hit hardest by the move to levy funding, with a five percentage point drop in market share and a 35 per cent fall in starts – compared with a 24 per cent drop across the whole of the sector.

 

Apprenticeships Vital to Tackling Future of Work Challenges
December 3, 2018
0

The following article was published in HR Magazine

Over three-quarters (78%) of businesses strongly believe that ‘earn-and-learn training’ can help address future workplace challenges, according to The 5% Club

Employer-members of The 5% Club were asked for their opinion on a number of challenges facing their sector and the role of apprenticeships and other earn-and-learn training.

All businesses surveyed agreed that on-the-job training can help companies prepare for the future by providing relevant skills, with 78% strongly agreeing. A majority (91%) said that earn-and-learn training could significantly help to address ongoing skills gaps.

A further 67% stated that earn-and-learn training, such as apprenticeships, is critical for upskilling an ageing workforce.

Penny Cobham, director general of The 5% Club, said that growth in AI, combined with an ageing population, spelled significant challenges for businesses.

“Over the next few years businesses will face unprecedented change. The increasing use of artificial intelligence data insight and other technological advances will become the expected norm for businesses in order to thrive and as such, we need to prepare our workforces accordingly,” she said. Read more

RoATP: Tougher Rules to Ensure High Quality Apprenticeships

The following article was written by the ESFA.

We have published new, tougher rules for providers and employers applying for and securing a place on the Register of Apprenticeship Training Providers (RoATP).

The strengthened approach will mean only ‎providers that meet the tougher registration requirements can access government funding. The‎ move follows a review of the RoATP, taking on board valuable feedback from provider representative bodies, providers and employers, and forms part of the Government’s continued commitment to improving the quality of apprenticeship training.

To secure a place on the RoATP, providers and employers must now prove they have actively traded for 12 months, are financially stable (evidenced by their financial information), skilled and are able to deliver quality apprenticeship training, before they apply, rather than when they begin delivery. The 3-month trading history requirement for supporting providers has been retained to enable new providers to build a delivery track record.

Acting on feedback from the sector, the register will open for applications on 12 December 2018 and will remain open throughout the year, with no closing date. This means providers can apply when they feel they are ready and can prove they have the appropriate capacity, capability and skills in place to meet the registers robust entry requirements. Two applications in a 12 month period will be allowed. ‎

ESFA is also considering the introduction of provider earnings limits and in the coming months, will be seeking views from the sector on these. The limits will ensure control, not just for quality reasons but the potential size Anne milton100x100and expansion of providers.

Anne Milton, Skills and Apprenticeship Minister said:

“Apprenticeships are giving people of all ages and background the chance to gain the skills they need to secure a good job and progress in their careers.

“It is vital that the training apprentices are receiving continues to be of the highest quality. Our new tougher approach builds on the robust checks already in place to provide even greater assurance that public money for apprenticeships is being used effectively.

“I would like to thank all those who took the time to respond to our review. Your feedback has been invaluable and has helped us to shape this new process.” Read more

Apprenticeship Pay Survey

It provides important information on training, hours and pay from current apprentices. The findings enable us to look at wage levels nationally, measure changes with previous years and monitor whether employers are adhering to the rules on fair pay. The research will help set pay policy and to make improvements in apprenticeship training.

IFF Research, an independent research organisation, will undertake the research on our behalf

The selected apprentices will receive a letter explaining the purpose of the research and who to contact if they have further questions. They are then interviewed by phone. Around 10,000 apprentices will take part in the phone interview which includes questions on: Read more

IAG Online is Stephen Fry proof thanks to caching by WP Super Cache