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From Careers to Experiences
June 30, 2020
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The following article was first published in The Wall Street Journal in 2018.

In the 21st century, careers may no longer be narrowly defined by highly structured jobs and skills, but by experiences and learning agility.

As technology becomes increasingly central to organizations’ business models and ability to compete, many successful CIOs have prioritized building and maintaining the pools of talent required to meet new challenges. Such efforts include recruiting and hiring top talent and then finding ways to keep these employees engaged, challenged, and advancing within their organizations.

What does the modern career path look like? It’s evolving into a series of developmental experiences, each offering a person the opportunity to acquire new skills, perspectives, and judgment. Among 10 trends highlighted in Deloitte’s 2018 Global Human Capital Trends report, 84 percent of survey respondents cite “from careers to experiences” as very important or important, making it the third most singled-out trend this year, yet only 37 percent think they are very ready or ready to address this transition (Figure 1).

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Seven Tips for Changing Your Career Path
June 19, 2020
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The following article may be of help to any clients who are at a career crossroads.

Are you completely unsatisfied with your current job? Would you do anything to turn your life around? Do you want to push forward with your plans as soon as possible?

If your answer to these questions is yes, you will need to take on board the following seven tips to change your career path. They will help you to change your career path for the better. It might be an intimidating career pathprospect, but if you plan ahead, think positive, and keep your cool, you are sure to secure success. Hopefully, it won’t be long until you are looking back at this moment; thrilled that you had the nerve to follow your dreams.

Work out what it is you don’t like about your current job

Before you do anything else, you will need to work out what it is you don’t like about your current job. It will save you from making the same mistake over and over again. Overhauling your career path is a big step to take, so the last thing you want is to end up in exactly the same position. That is why you should write a detailed account of everything your current job lacks. You could also try keeping a journal, as this will allow you to make daily entries that explore your grievances. Then, when it comes to finding your new profession, you will have a clear idea of the areas that you are unwilling to compromise on. Whether you decide never to work long hours again, never to put up with a demanding boss, or never to make do with a tiring commute, the most important thing is that you know your limits.

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Career Girls®
June 10, 2020
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The mission of Career Girls is for all girls to reach their full potential and discover their own path to empowerment through access to inspiring career role models and supportive girl-centric curriculum.

Based in the United States, CareerGirls.org is a video-based career exploration tool for girls, with an emphasis on Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) careers. It’s free to use and free of commercials.

It includes over 7,000 video clips featuring more than 400 women role models. These successful women work in different careers—ranging from astronaut to musician to veterinarian—all over the United States.

CareerGirls.org is unique. It provides inspirational and educational videos of real women who have made it in their chosen fields—and combines these videos with other useful tools for both girls and educators. As well as the videos, their site also includes a range of free resources which you may be able to adapt to your own information, advice and guidance environment.

Visit the Careers Girls website HERE

These Are the Three Key Dynamics Shaping Modern Careers
May 20, 2020
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The following article was written by Lisa Mainiero Professor of Management at Fairfield University and is published in collaboration with LSE Business Review.

The career landscape of the 21st century, characterised by work interruptions, opt-outs, and temporary contingent work assignments, requires that we think differently about linear careers. 

Until now, much of the career literature has been based on men in the twentieth century who had linear careers in a single corporation or industry. However, men and women in the 21st century have unique career trajectories, sometimes fulfilling the ideal of a linear career, but more often characterised by opt-outs, contingent employment contracts, and part-time work. The Kaleidoscope Career Model (the KCM) (Mainiero & Sullivan, 20052006) addresses the unique features of male and female careers and takes into consideration the non-linear aspects of contingent work. The KCM posits that needs for authenticity, balance and challenge over the course of a career will be present but arise at different intensities across the lifespan.

The three parameters

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Three Proven Ways to Boost Your Career Mojo
March 19, 2020
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An article in HRMagazine by Michael Brown.

How much of your working week are you spending on things you think you should be doing, and doing them well? Write down your average percentage across a typical week.

I wonder how your answer compares with the average, which I have been researching through my training programmes over 20 years.

The average is a mere 40%. That means most people reckon they spend three days per week doing things they shouldn’t, or doing things they should be doing but doing them badly.

Quite how organisations survive on two days’ productivity per week is beyond me. But I’m a natural optimist, and believe that this figure can change for the better through some simple changes in behaviour and attitude. These three things will boost your career mojo more than any others.

First up, your biggest time waster: useless meetings. Poorly run, often irrelevant to you (but you got invited just in case), unfocused, and lacking ownership and clarity over who is going to do what.

They sap your energy, waste your time and cause frustration and poor morale, but for some reason we don’t do anything about it. Here are three things you can do to change all that:

  • Don’t attend meetings which don’t have an agenda. They will probably be the most badly run and unfocussed of all of them. Ask for an agenda, and if you’re told there is no agenda, say you can’t therefore assess whether it’s a good use of your time, and decline it.
  • Suggest to the meeting owner that they put a time limit on each item on the agenda, and then have someone call it when you have five minutes left. It’s amazing how this focuses the discussion.
  • Start each meeting with a review of the actions from the previous meeting. Once people realise that they are going to be asked to account for themselves it somehow raises their commitment to doing what they say they will.
  • Bonus item: finish every meeting with a review of how the meeting went, and how it could be improved next time. Funny how that seems to create a cycle of continuous improvement. It also allows people to give each other feedback; it might be a chance for the introverts (usually about half the people in the meeting) to say whether they felt listened to and included or not.

None of the above involves rocket science. Just plain common sense and a healthy dose of assertiveness.

Second on my list of mojo boosters is building trust with your key stakeholders. Trust levels in society are at an all-time low, and in the workplace this means collaboration becomes rarer and we find ourselves putting energy into covering our own back, defending our own territory and having a scarcity mindset as opposed to one of abundance.

The best way to build trust is to spend time with people. Get to know colleagues informally (away from the office is a good place to do it), and start to share more of the human factor with them.

Over time you start to uncover your shared interests, values and concerns, and can work towards helping each other to achieve them.

Finally, my third suggestion for making more good days at the office: negotiate more for yourself. Far too many people aren’t aware of some of the basic principles of negotiation, and this leaves them vulnerable when others negotiate with them (which is most of the time, as most transactions between two humans involve some element of negotiation). Here are some negotiation principles that lead you to not being on the wrong end of the deal quite so often:

  • Be ready to negotiate. When people ask you for something they don’t always expect you to say yes, and are ready to look at alternatives if you go about it the right way. So don’t think that doing what you’re asked to every time is what is expected.
  • Test people’s positions. When they ask for something, they often don’t really mean it. There is normally at least 20% ‘wiggle room’; to be had, so test whether there is.
  • Don’t give anything away for free. That way people will value it more, and you may find you get something back in return.
  • Insert ‘if’ into your response. “If I do that analysis for Friday can you do the slide deck?” Suddenly this is a two-way street and we are collaborating. This will improve our relationship, not weaken it.

I’m often amazed at people’s reactions when I suggest they make these changes. It’s as if the clouds have parted and the Sun has finally broken through.

To my mind they are nothing more than a statement of the obvious, but if they are not obvious to you (perhaps because you are so busy you have forgotten the basics) then I am confident they will make a real and sustainable difference to your workplace experience.

Michael Brown has been a business skills coach and trainer for more than 20 years and is author of My Job Isn’t Working!

Developing Rolls-Royce Procurement Specialists
March 17, 2020
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By Gordon Tytler, Director of Procurement at Rolls-Royce.

After almost three decades of working in procurement, the biggest change Gordon Tytler has seen isn’t the technology or speed of delivery, but the professionalism of the people working behind the scenes to purchase and move products around the globe. “The people that we have and the quality of the people that we’ve got is phenomenal,” the director of procurement for Rolls-Royce says. 

Procurement specialists today are more than buyers; they need to have a strong business sense and be able to guide a company’s decision-making. “Procurement is very much a people- and knowledge-based organization,” Tytler says. “The tools allow us to operate more efficiently, more effectively and allow us to link with our suppliers. But, the key differentiator for successful procurement is its people.” 

Tytler’s belief in the value of his employees is part of why Rolls-Royce invests heavily in training and recruitment. The company encourages its team members to join professional organizations such as the Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport, the Institute of Supply Management and the Chartered Institute of Procurement and Supply. 

Those organizations are one way employees improve their skills knowledge, but Rolls-Royce also offers training at every level of a person’s career. Early training tends to center on a person’s capabilities. As they progress through their career, training becomes more focused on leadership and how individuals can contribute to a high-performance culture. Tytler himself recently took part in a leadership academy course held at England’s Oxford University for Rolls-Royce’s top 150 executives. “That commitment to training at all levels is very, very strong,” Tytler says.

Identifying those people who can contribute to Rolls-Royce’s high-performance culture begins during recruitment. The company draws students from universities around the world and regularly holds career fairs. 

When hiring or promoting, Tytler says Rolls-Royce is not only looking at skills and capabilities, but also the individual’s behaviour and culture. The company wants people who can build a culture of collaboration, innovation and entrepreneurism while sourcing materials in an ethical way and creating long-term relationships with suppliers. “We’ve got some absolutely brilliant people,” Tytler says. “Their skills, their behaviours are fantastic. The how we do the job is equally important to what we do.” 

Centrally Led, Locally Deployed

Tytler himself is a product of Rolls-Royce’s career advancement training. He joined the company as an engineer in 1989 and has spent the last 28 years serving in various roles in factories, procurement, supply chain and logistics. In that time, he’s worked for four out of the five divisions of the company and lived in both the United States and Norway. His most recent step forward with the company came in April 2016 when Tytler was named the director of procurement for the group. 

In his new position, Tytler is responsible for administering Rolls-Royce’s $9 billion annual spend in an ethical and sustainable way. The procurement group alone has 1,100 people, divided among the company’s three divisions: Civil aerospace, defense aerospace, power systems and group for indirect purchases. Tytler acts as the strategic and functional leader for all three of those procurement groups and has direct accountability for the group indirect purchases.

Read the full article http://www.scw-mag.com/sections/manufacturing-distribution/849-rolls-royce

Career Decision-Making Workbook
February 26, 2020
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Produced by The Canadian Career Development Foundation, this workbook has pages of questionnaires, activities and templates that you may be able to use or adapt to use with your own clients.

Career Decision-Making Workbook

Less than the cost of a cup of coffee is being spent on providing careers advice to young people in our schools and colleges
November 13, 2019
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On the 12th November at the national Careers England Summit in London a report will be published which reveals that schools are unable to provide young people with the careers advice and guidance they need.

The report shows that very little of the money the DfE are spending on careers actually goes to the schools and the people working with and supporting young people.

The report shows that despite schools now recognising the vital importance of careers provision they are unable to deliver this due to a lack of funding:

  • Only 10% have adequate funding
  • 75% have insufficient, limited or no funding
  • It highlights around a 5 th of secondary schools receive less than £2K in funding per annum. Given average size of secondary school is 1000 this equates to circa £2 per student – less than the cost of purchasing a cup of coffee!
  •  About a third of secondary schools receive less than £5k per annum – £5 per students.
  •  Yet 84% of schools “strongly agree” or “agree” that careers provision in their schools is now a high priority.

TES person of the year 2018, Jules White, started the WorthLess? Campaign in 2015 because he felt frustrated that children were not getting the full range of opportunities they needed and deserved. At the same time, the Department for Education was telling everyone that we’d never had it so good and there was “more money going into our schools than ever before”.

As the Government rolls out the second wave of Career Hubs over the next 12 months, which aim to provide local, targeted careers and advice and guidance to young people, the Local Government Association is concerned that the Hubs will support only 1,300 schools and colleges and only reach a fraction of young people, meaning the Government careers advice scheme will fail to reach thousands of young people.

deirdre hughes100x100

Dr Deirdre Hughes OBE, former Chair, National Careers Council, England said:

“We need to provide funding direct to schools to enable them to employ careers professionals to provide much more support for young people. How can it be right that less than the cost of a cup of coffee is being spent on providing careers advice to young people in our secondary schools and academies?

“This generation are seriously missing out. Clearly ill-informed career decisions from an early age have long-term cost implications for both the individual and society as a whole.” 

John Yarham 100x100

John Yarham, Interim CEO of The Careers & Enterprise Company said:

“We agree with this survey’s finding that careers provision in schools is now a high priority, with Careers Leaders in schools at the forefront of this improvement. The Careers Leader role is now one year old.

“Our survey with the Gatsby Charitable Foundation of 750 Careers Leaders shows:

  • 88% say their role is having a positive impact on young peoples’ outcomes
  • 81% feel positive about the future of careers provision

“Good quality careers advice is an important element of careers support in the Gatsby best practice benchmarks and we recognise the issues that surround this, including affordability. We look forward to working with Careers Leaders to strengthen the provision of careers advice in their schools.“

The national survey of school leaders and careers professionals was undertaken by Careers England, supported by NAHT and the Worthless? Campaign – with technical input from Dr Deirdre Hughes OBE.

It aimed to identify what support, if any, is being given to schools to help them provide careers advice and guidance for young people. There were a total of 191 responses.

Only Half of 16-18 Year-Olds Plan on Going to University
October 21, 2019
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New research from jobs board, Monster.co.uk shows that today’s 16-18 year-olds no longer see a university degree as the only route to a good career. Just 53% say they are considering going to university, whilst 22% plan on completing an apprenticeship.

This is a significant drop since 2013 when 86% of young people said that a university education was important.[1]

With the average student graduating with over £50,000 of debt, 42% of school leavers are put off from going to university because of money.[2] And over a third (35%) believe that doing a degree doesn’t guarantee you a great job.

Monster.co.uk’s research shows that teenagers and their parents are broadly in agreement. When asked, 48% of parents and 60% of school leavers believe that getting a degree will get you a better job than completing an apprenticeship. Whilst 41% of parents think an apprenticeship is the best route for their child. 

Across the UK, parents and teenagers in the North East have the most positive outlook towards apprenticeships. 37% of teens in the region are considering an apprenticeship, compared to UK average of 22%. For parents in the North East, 69% believed apprenticeships stand you in better stead to get a good job than gaining a degree. With the North East currently home to the country’s highest unemployment rate, apprenticeships offer an immediate route into work, rather than going to university and graduating with huge debt and no job guarantee.[3]

Derek Jenkins, General Manager UK & Ireland, Monster.co.ukmonster.ie  comments: “With the cost of university tuition young people are moving away from the idea that degrees are essential to getting a good job. While it’s great to see more options available, making this huge decision at a young age is putting school leavers under a lot of pressure. At 16, 17 or 18 who honestly knows what they want to do for the rest of their lives? Instead of rushing into something, consider taking a year out to do internships and gain experience in different industries, or go travelling before making that decision.

“Whatever route you do decide to go down, if it doesn’t work out, don’t panic. You won’t be the first person to drop out of university or switch careers. Often it’s only through trial and error that you end up where you really want to be”

For anyone concerned that they won’t be able to get a good job without a degree, there are still a number of high paying and interesting jobs that you don’t need a degree for. Monster have created the top 10 highest paying jobs that you don’t need a degree for:

The top 10 highest paying jobs which you don’t need a degree for

1. Firefighter – Firefighters can earn up to £40,000 per year, depending on their rank. General managers can earn around the £30,000 mark, but if you become a station manager you may collect upwards of 40k. To start, you’ll need to pass written exams and aptitude tests. You must be fit too – a number of physical exams are included as part of the selection process.

2. Police constable – As a police officer, there’s a variety of different roles you can do, and it’s not all about being out on the streets fighting crime directly. Depending on where you are, salaries start at around £20,000 with the potential for growth of £45,000 and upwards for sergeants.  Once you get into inspector territory as your career progresses, you can expect up to £50,000.

3. Entrepreneur – You don’t technically need any qualifications to become a business owner – just a huge amount of drive, determination and a brilliant idea. With 1 in 10 Brits dreaming of owning their own businesses, what you earn will depend on how successful you are.[4]

4. Train and tram drivers – Newly-qualified drivers can earn up to £25,000, while experienced ones take home up to £50,000. There are some great benefits too, like free and discounted rail travel.

5. Training managers – Training managers conduct training programmes for employers in a variety of different sectors. The average national salary is £37,000, with the potential for more, depending on the company, industry experience and location.

6. Project manager – Project managers can work in a variety of different fields and are responsible for making sure the project is a success. Responsibilities include planning, budgeting, overseeing and documenting. The average salary is around £40,000 depending on the area and location.

7. Air traffic controllers – There’s no degree needed here, but you will need a calm nerve, 5 GCSEs and three years’ training to obtain your air traffic control licence from the National Air Traffic Services (NATS). Starting salaries are £17,000 to £21,000, while experienced controllers can reach up to £50,000 depending on where you work and shift allowances.

8. Sales managers – Sales managers are responsible for leading their sales team to success. You’ll need excellent communication and management skills, as well as proficient IT knowledge. Basic salaries start at £18,000 and can reach a potential of £100,000 – and more thanks to commission.

9. Construction manager – Being a construction manager involves having good leadership and communication skills in order to coordinate and supervise projects. Although some of the work can be done from the office, this role also means working on-site – in all weather. On the plus side, Construction Managers can earn upwards of £50,000.

10. Hazardous-waste manager – It might not sound appealing at first, but managers in this field can expect to receive upwards of £36,000 to get rid of hazardous by-products produced by organisations such as hospitals and factories. The level of skill required to do this role makes it incredibly lucrative.

  1. Censuswide survey of 500 UK 16-18 year-olds
  2. Monster survey of 1100 UK parents
  3. Monster Jobs Confidence Index Q3 report
Sky Betting and Gaming Tech Academy Graduate Programme Open​ for Applications
October 18, 2019
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The 2020 Sky Betting and Gaming Tech Academy Graduate Programme is now open for applications! The following is part of their promotional campaign.

If you’re passionate about Technology and want to work for one of the UK’s leading Tech companies on some of the country’s leading apps, websites and games, we want to hear from you!

Our unique Tech Academy Grad programme puts you on the path towards a company sponsored Master’s degree in Digital and Technology Solutions, accredited by Sheffield Hallam University.

We’re working to make a career in Tech more accessible and that’s why, whether you’re from a tech background or you’re completely new to the industry, our programme is open to all degree disciplines.

We’re also particularly excited to launch our programme on Ada Lovelace Day, an international celebration of the achievements of women in science, technology, engineering and maths.

We’re proud to announce that our 2019 cohort is 80% female increasing the diversity of future leaders in Tech. To find out more and to apply for our programme click the link below:

https://www.skybetcareers.com/tech-academy-graduate-programme

To view the promotional video following the link below:

Sky Betting & Gaming Tech Academy