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Only Half of 16-18 Year-Olds Plan on Going to University
October 21, 2019
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New research from jobs board, Monster.co.uk shows that today’s 16-18 year-olds no longer see a university degree as the only route to a good career. Just 53% say they are considering going to university, whilst 22% plan on completing an apprenticeship.

This is a significant drop since 2013 when 86% of young people said that a university education was important.[1]

With the average student graduating with over £50,000 of debt, 42% of school leavers are put off from going to university because of money.[2] And over a third (35%) believe that doing a degree doesn’t guarantee you a great job.

Monster.co.uk’s research shows that teenagers and their parents are broadly in agreement. When asked, 48% of parents and 60% of school leavers believe that getting a degree will get you a better job than completing an apprenticeship. Whilst 41% of parents think an apprenticeship is the best route for their child. 

Across the UK, parents and teenagers in the North East have the most positive outlook towards apprenticeships. 37% of teens in the region are considering an apprenticeship, compared to UK average of 22%. For parents in the North East, 69% believed apprenticeships stand you in better stead to get a good job than gaining a degree. With the North East currently home to the country’s highest unemployment rate, apprenticeships offer an immediate route into work, rather than going to university and graduating with huge debt and no job guarantee.[3]

Derek Jenkins, General Manager UK & Ireland, Monster.co.ukmonster.ie  comments: “With the cost of university tuition young people are moving away from the idea that degrees are essential to getting a good job. While it’s great to see more options available, making this huge decision at a young age is putting school leavers under a lot of pressure. At 16, 17 or 18 who honestly knows what they want to do for the rest of their lives? Instead of rushing into something, consider taking a year out to do internships and gain experience in different industries, or go travelling before making that decision.

“Whatever route you do decide to go down, if it doesn’t work out, don’t panic. You won’t be the first person to drop out of university or switch careers. Often it’s only through trial and error that you end up where you really want to be”

For anyone concerned that they won’t be able to get a good job without a degree, there are still a number of high paying and interesting jobs that you don’t need a degree for. Monster have created the top 10 highest paying jobs that you don’t need a degree for:

The top 10 highest paying jobs which you don’t need a degree for

1. Firefighter – Firefighters can earn up to £40,000 per year, depending on their rank. General managers can earn around the £30,000 mark, but if you become a station manager you may collect upwards of 40k. To start, you’ll need to pass written exams and aptitude tests. You must be fit too – a number of physical exams are included as part of the selection process.

2. Police constable – As a police officer, there’s a variety of different roles you can do, and it’s not all about being out on the streets fighting crime directly. Depending on where you are, salaries start at around £20,000 with the potential for growth of £45,000 and upwards for sergeants.  Once you get into inspector territory as your career progresses, you can expect up to £50,000.

3. Entrepreneur – You don’t technically need any qualifications to become a business owner – just a huge amount of drive, determination and a brilliant idea. With 1 in 10 Brits dreaming of owning their own businesses, what you earn will depend on how successful you are.[4]

4. Train and tram drivers – Newly-qualified drivers can earn up to £25,000, while experienced ones take home up to £50,000. There are some great benefits too, like free and discounted rail travel.

5. Training managers – Training managers conduct training programmes for employers in a variety of different sectors. The average national salary is £37,000, with the potential for more, depending on the company, industry experience and location.

6. Project manager – Project managers can work in a variety of different fields and are responsible for making sure the project is a success. Responsibilities include planning, budgeting, overseeing and documenting. The average salary is around £40,000 depending on the area and location.

7. Air traffic controllers – There’s no degree needed here, but you will need a calm nerve, 5 GCSEs and three years’ training to obtain your air traffic control licence from the National Air Traffic Services (NATS). Starting salaries are £17,000 to £21,000, while experienced controllers can reach up to £50,000 depending on where you work and shift allowances.

8. Sales managers – Sales managers are responsible for leading their sales team to success. You’ll need excellent communication and management skills, as well as proficient IT knowledge. Basic salaries start at £18,000 and can reach a potential of £100,000 – and more thanks to commission.

9. Construction manager – Being a construction manager involves having good leadership and communication skills in order to coordinate and supervise projects. Although some of the work can be done from the office, this role also means working on-site – in all weather. On the plus side, Construction Managers can earn upwards of £50,000.

10. Hazardous-waste manager – It might not sound appealing at first, but managers in this field can expect to receive upwards of £36,000 to get rid of hazardous by-products produced by organisations such as hospitals and factories. The level of skill required to do this role makes it incredibly lucrative.

  1. Censuswide survey of 500 UK 16-18 year-olds
  2. Monster survey of 1100 UK parents
  3. Monster Jobs Confidence Index Q3 report
Sky Betting and Gaming Tech Academy Graduate Programme Open​ for Applications
October 18, 2019
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The 2020 Sky Betting and Gaming Tech Academy Graduate Programme is now open for applications! The following is part of their promotional campaign.

If you’re passionate about Technology and want to work for one of the UK’s leading Tech companies on some of the country’s leading apps, websites and games, we want to hear from you!

Our unique Tech Academy Grad programme puts you on the path towards a company sponsored Master’s degree in Digital and Technology Solutions, accredited by Sheffield Hallam University.

We’re working to make a career in Tech more accessible and that’s why, whether you’re from a tech background or you’re completely new to the industry, our programme is open to all degree disciplines.

We’re also particularly excited to launch our programme on Ada Lovelace Day, an international celebration of the achievements of women in science, technology, engineering and maths.

We’re proud to announce that our 2019 cohort is 80% female increasing the diversity of future leaders in Tech. To find out more and to apply for our programme click the link below:

https://www.skybetcareers.com/tech-academy-graduate-programme

To view the promotional video following the link below:

Sky Betting & Gaming Tech Academy

Career Ambitions ‘Already Limited by Age of Seven’
October 17, 2019
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By Sean Coughlan BBC News family and education correspondent.

By the age of seven, children are already facing limits on their future aspirations in work, according to a report from the OECD international economics think tank.

Andreas Schleicher, the OECD’s director of education and skills, says “talent is being wasted” because of ingrained stereotyping about social background, gender and race.

He is backing a project from the Education and Employers careers charity to give children a wider understanding of the range of jobs available.

Social mobility barriers

Mr Schleicher says children have begun making assumptions about what type of people will enter different types of work while they are still in primary school.

There are only “minimal changes” in attitudes towards career options between the ages of seven and 17, says the report produced jointly by the OECD and Education and Employers.

classroom

The report, warning of the barriers to social mobility, says too often young people consider only the jobs that are already familiar to them, from friends and family.

“You can’t be what you can’t see. We’re not saying seven-year-olds have to choose their careers now but we must fight to keep their horizons open,” says Mr Schleicher.

He is backing the Education and Employers’ efforts to bring people from the world of work into schools, with the aim of widening access to the jobs market and raising aspirations.

“It’s a question of social justice and common sense to tackle ingrained assumptions as early as possible or they will be very tough to unpick later on,” says Mr Schleicher.

Light-bulb moment

The OECD education chief will speak at an Education and Employers event in London on Tuesday, where the charity will announce plans to double to 100,000 the network of people who go into schools and talk about their jobs and career paths.

At present there are more than 50,000 volunteers, representing jobs from “app designers to zoologists”.

Jobs

The intention is to create “light-bulb moments” where young people can see a possible new direction and hear from role models.

Research for the careers report shows that young people often have very narrow ideas about potential job options.

The most common influences are the occupations of people in their family, the jobs they see in the media and the type of work they see as most likely for people of their gender and background.

‘Out of reach’

The findings show that in primary school, boys from wealthier homes are more likely to expect to become lawyers or managers while girls from deprived backgrounds are expecting to go into hairdressing or shop work.

Boys from deprived backgrounds were particularly likely to want to go into careers such as sport or entertainment.

Mr Schleicher warns of a mismatch between the limited range of aspirations and the changing demands of the jobs market.

“Too often young people’s ambitions are narrowed by an innate sense of what people from their background should aspire to and what’s out of reach,” says Nick Chambers, chief executive of Education and Employers.

“The importance of exposure to the world of work at primary age cannot be overstated,” says Paul Whiteman, leader of the National Association of Head Teachers. 

“The earlier children’s aspirations are raised and broadened, the better.”

The Trailblazer’s Guide to Careers
August 12, 2019
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Trailblazers is a series of Careers Podcasts. It is an American website with numerous podcasts explaining a range of different jobs which your clients might be interested to hear.

Explore the different career paths you can unlock with Salesforce skills.

Hear real people talking about their jobs using Salesforce, what skills and qualities will make you successful, and what you can do to get started.

Follow the link below:

https://trailhead.salesforce.com/en/podcasts/the-trailblazers-guide-to-careers?dclid=CPforN2D-OMCFbIW0wodPn0AHw

ViewPoint: Understand Cognitive Science to Work Better by Art Markman
July 9, 2019
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Neuroscience can help people better understand themselves and colleagues, according to academic and author Art Markman

“The fundamental problem with work today is that we start by assuming that everyone else is going to do things in exactly the same way that we would do them. We think ‘how can this person possibly be productive if they are not working in the same way as me?’,” the professor of psychology and marketing at the University of Texas at Austin said.

Speaking at the launch of his book Bring Your Brain To Work: Using Cognitive Science to Get a Job, Do it Well, and Advance Your Career, Markman explained how by having an understanding of psychology individuals can improve their careers and work more effectively with others.

“Science tells us that there are some issues at work that have to be fixed, but if we can understand the underlying psychological issues behind them we’ll be more able to help, and understand how we can use people effectively and help them reach their goals,” he said.

Markman’s book explores how an understanding of neuroscience can help people get more out of work and better understand their motivations.

When people take a traditional approach to their careers they can often end up ignoring some of the complexities of working life, Markman said: “By looking at psychology in the workplace it allows us to manage our own jobs in a more effective way. It can help us think about how there isn’t always a seamless path from getting one job to moving to the next. It helps us to work a little better with people, because we understand why they work in certain ways and that they are different from us.”

One of the main reasons people feel stuck at work is that they feel unable to make mistakes, he explained. Learning how to improvise and move on from failures is key, he said: “The people who have the best ideas are the people who have the most ideas. A lot of them might be bad, but you have to be willing to throw a bunch of stuff out there – even if a lot of it is bad – before you can get to the good stuff. This has emerged from my experience of learning to play the saxophone.

“I would pick it up, play a wrong note, and would get annoyed at myself and stop. My teacher would say ‘why did you stop? That note has gone, why are you getting worried about it? You did something, it was wrong, but stop worrying about it and try something else’.

“The ability to have an idea, figure out it’s a bad idea, and then have another idea is an incredibly powerful way to learn how to improvise.”

Employers can play an important role in allowing people to grow and continue learning, Markman added: “Success in your job should be about your ability to do that job rather than being able to know everything from day one. It should be organisations’ jobs to help you do that.”

60% of Gen Z Know What Career They Want Before They Are 20
June 21, 2019
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New research has identified that over half (53%) of 16-20-year-olds wouldn’t consider a career in hospitality.

The top reasons for this are it’s seen as ‘a stepping stone to another career’, as having ‘limited career prospects’ and viewed as ‘a part-time job while studying’ – posing the question, do hospitality careers need a re-brand?

The results, which are from a new study by HIT Training and Get My First Job, highlight the worrying perceptions the younger generation have of hospitality careers and the need for the sector to address these and open the door to future talent. Read more

Article in FENews: College Careers Provision Given the Thumps Up
June 3, 2019
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Waltham Forest College has recently been assessed under the matrix Standard, which is a unique quality standard used to assess and measure the delivery and impact of the overall careers service.

The two-and-a-half-day assessment involved a matrix assessor interviewing key stakeholders such as staff who lead and deliver the careers service, to students, partner schools and employers who all receive the careers service as end users.

Student Services and the Business Development departments underwent the review and were able to demonstrate the careers service in practice and articulate key strategies used by the College to show effectiveness in improving its key outcomes.

The assessment report outlined clear leadership and direction for staff who deliver the service and further highlighted how staff are being developed to ensure that the College is able to meet and respond to the demands within the sector. Read more

Guide to Spotting the Stresses of Climbing the Career Ladder
May 30, 2019
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Landing a promotion, getting your first full-time job or returning to work after having a baby are all meant to be exciting milestonesgrayscale photography of hands under body of water in a person’s life. However, expectations of these events may leave employees feeling underwhelmed when they occur.

To mark Mental Health Awareness Week (13-19th May), Bupa Health Clinics1 has released a new report which reveals Britons admit to feeling upset or down after comparing their experience of a milestone to someone else’s on social media. Eighty-five per cent of people said they felt this way when returning to work after having a baby; 70% said it happened when starting their first job and 64% said they felt low after getting a promotion and seeing someone celebrate the same occasion on social media. 

Bupa Health Clinics’ Medical Director, Dr Arun Thiyagarajan, says:

“This new research shows how important it is for business leaders to be aware of their employees’ highs, as well as lows. It is important for leaders to be aware of external pressure that employees can bring into work and not just recognising pressures of things at work. 

“It’s easy to assume that someone getting a promotion or returning to work after having a baby has good mental wellbeing, but that isn’t always the case.”

Read more

Will Studying for a Masters Give me a Career Advantage?
May 28, 2019
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With so much competition in today’s job market, many students consider doing a Master’s Degree before launching themselves into their career. Those graduates who are already working may also consider obtaining a Master’s with a view to boosting their career prospects – and their salary

But do Master’s Degrees really help with you move up the career ladder?

How many people study for a master’s?

There were 566,555 students enrolled in post graduate programmes during 2017/2018, an increase from 551,595 the previous year.

Of these, 284,620 obtained a postgraduate qualification such as a Masters Degree or PhD (source: HESA). With the majority of students under 25, it would seem that most move directly from their undergraduate degree to a master’s.

How much does it cost to do a master’s? Read more

Top Tips for Inspiring Young People to Choose Engineering as a Career
May 23, 2019
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EngineeringUK has released a new free guide to help STEM professionals and ambassadors to deliver exciting and varied activities to help encourage young people to consider engineering as a career choice

Getting the message across is a top tips guide for anyone who provides engineering outreach activities in schools.

It encourages STEM professionals and ambassadors to plan inspiring and impactful activities by providing real-world examples of engineering matched to what students might be learning in the classroom.

Engineering cuts across all life from addressing some of society’s pressing challenges like climate change to building and designing new technology like mobile phones or apps for improving health and wellbeing.

The guide suggests that making links between the skills involved in the subjects young people study – such as maths, science, D&T, computing, geography, art and languages – and exciting job roles in engineering can really help students realise the value of these subjects for the future and switch them on to the idea of a career in engineering. Read more