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Have You Paid the Annual Data Protection Charge?

 Information from HR Revenue & Customs.

All businesses (including sole traders and partnerships) that process personal data are required to pay an annual data protection charge to the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) unless a relevant exemption applies.

It is a legal requirement to pay the charge, and failure to do so could result in a fine, but it also makes good business sense as it could have an impact on your business reputation. Once you have paid, your business details are published on the Information Commissioner’s register of data controllers.

There are three levels of charge payable: Read more

Accelerated Degress Approved by MPs
January 24, 2019
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The following article was published by the Department of Employment on 23rd January 2019

Proposals to increase choice for students and save on tuition fees have been passed by the House of CommonUniversities Minister Chris Skidmore

Students starting university from September 2019 are set to have more choice than ever before about how they study after MPs approved legislation to
support the expansion of two-year and other accelerated degrees.

Legislation was passed in the Commons last night, following proposals from the Department for Education, which means students studying shorter university courses – such as three-year courses condensed into two – would save 20 per cent on tuition fees compared to traditional courses. For example, students who opt for a two-year degree will save at least £5,500 in total tuition costs compared to a standard three-year course. The regulations will now go to the House of Lords for approval.

 

In addition to a saving on tuition fees, students will also benefit from a year without paying any maintenance costs through an accelerated course, which would allow them to access the workforce quicker

Read more

BBC News: University Chief Wants to Bring Back Maintenance Grants
August 7, 2018
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The BBC reports that the head of an elite group of universities has called for maintenance grants to be restored to help improve diversity in higher education.

Tim Bradshaw, who leads the Russell Group, told the Independent the grant could make a “substantial difference” to young people “nervous” about debt

He said it could also encourage more people to consider applying at all.

The government says it has made significant progress in getting disadvantaged students into university.

Maintenance grants used to be given to students in England and Wales from lower income backgrounds – families with annual incomes of £25,000 or less got the full grant of £3,387 a year.

In 2015, the then-Chancellor George Osborne announced they would be scrapped from September 2016.

He said the grants had become “unaffordable” and there was a “basic unfairness in asking taxpayers to fund grants for people who are likely to earn a lot more than them”.

But critics said many low and middle income students could be put off university by the measure. Read more