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Permanent Staff Appointments Decline as Brexit-Related Uncertainty Intensifies
April 24, 2019
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The latest KPMG and REC, UK Report on Jobs showed that heightened uncertainty towards the outlook underpinned the fastest decline in permanent staff appointments since mid-2016 in March.

Brexit-related uncertainty also contributed to a further steep decline in staff availability.

Key findings 

  • Permanent placements fall at quickest pace since July 2016
  • Vacancies increase at slowest rate since August 2016
  •  Availability of candidates continues to decline sharply

Read more

AI To Create 2.3 million Jobs By 2020
March 19, 2019
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Artificial Intelligence (AI) is slowly taking over our day-to-day lives – especially when it comes to the workplace and using tech to enhance and fast-track tasks writes Alesandra  Berger.

There are many sectors in which AI can help improve services – specifically national health services, banking and legal  services.

Not only do some of the biggest names in technology debate over the future of AI, and how it continues to make life easier and better for many, but we are now seeing some of the biggest tech companies recruiting heavily in AI.

But, who is recruiting for AI roles the most whilst making big steps in looking toward the future?

With AI-related jobs more than doubling over the past three years and job postings related to AI increasing by 119%, RS Components has analysed job posts from some of the world’s biggest tech companies to discover who has the highest percentage of AI-related job openings.

A former Google Exec has predicted that AI will replace 40 per cent of jobs in the next 15 years. Kai-Fu Lee stated that AI will allow entire new industries to be built from the ground up, with automation in mind. AI will be cheaper than human employees, however, it will also create new roles, as well as replace current ones.

As AI progresses beyond development stages and into regular usage, more and more companies are looking to recruit machine learning talent, develop the AI skills of their existing workforce, and begin to use the technology throughout various sectors of their business.

However in a Ernst & Young poll last year, 56% of senior AI professionals argued that lack of talent and qualified workers is the greatest single barrier to the implementation of AI across business operations.

Similarly, the 2018 survey by O’Reilly named ‘How Companies Are Putting AI to Work Through Deep Learning also revealed that the AI skills gap is the largest barrier to AI adoption, but that company culture, company resources and data challenges also contribute to this.

Our academic and training programmes are also struggling to keep up with the pace of innovation and development of AI, further widening the existing gap. But whilst recent research found that only 1 in 4 workers strongly agree that their company equips employees with the skills needed to take advantage of AI, it is suggested that advanced technical education might not be necessary to bridge this gap.

So how can you get ahead and help close the AI skills gap many workplaces are currently experiencing? And how might future career training initiatives be affected by this skill gap?

AI is expected to create 2.3 million jobs by 2020, with job titles such as machine learning engineer, computer vision engineer and data scientist being amongst the most in-demand AI jobs. According to research by Indeed, the most in-demand AI skills include machine learning, Python, R programming, data science, Java programming, and data mining.

These skills, which are currently in significant shortage, beg the question – will the curricula need to change to prepare children for the future workforce?

A recent report by Raconteur describes how Miles Berry, a key architect of the national curriculum for computing, introduced to replace ICT four years ago, is disheartened at how few schools have exploited the new programme fully.

“AI is difficult to teach and schools either lack relevant resources or don’t know how to apply them, but in order to plug the technology skills gap, we must give our youngsters time to experiment with creating rudimentary chatbots for example,” Miles says.

Whilst growing numbers of primary and secondary schools are now teaching students how to code, this only covers one small element of AI, and a skill which is predicted to be “old hat” by the time they’re old enough to enter the workforce.

One way to increase the AI skills gap would be to continue to increase resources for digital, math and technical education in schools – as a sole focus on driving more students in to computer science will not solve the issue.

Devising technology-specific education or training schemes will also help develop the skills of the future workforce. For example, last year the Massachusetts Institute of Technology announced plans to have an AI-focused college built by 2022.

Closer to home, tech giants such as Amazon have an AI-focused lab near the University of Cambridge and there are plans to build a technology University in Milton Keynes which will “focus on skills for the future” by 2023.

The University will be designed as an education institution for the 21st century, delivering a STEM- focused curriculum in key areas including digital, cybe, autonomy, robotics and AI.

Until there are new graduates with the appropriate level of AI skills to step into these roles, many companies should currently be focusing on upskilling and retraining present staff. The future of work will require employees to be ever-more agile and change their skills to keep up with technology, which is constantly developing.

Alexandra Berger, Senior Vice President, Marketing & Communications EMEA region, RS Components

About Alexandra: With over 18 years’ experience across an international business-to-business environment, working for companies including Unilever, SC Johnson, SealedAir and Rexel, Alexandra’s experience includes global, regional and country leadership roles in Marketing and Business Management.  Alexandra’s broad experience has seen her lead digital transformation programmes, brand development initiatives and customer experience programmes. Most recently Alexandra joined RS Components as Senior Vice President, Marketing & Communications for the company’s EMEA region, where she is leading the transformation of the marketing function. RS Components is the trading brand of Electrocomponents plc, the global distributor for engineers. Supporting & inspiring generations of engineers since 1937.

The 20 Best Cities for Graduates to Find Jobs Right Now
March 19, 2019
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New data by AdView’s based on an analysed of 13 different metrics, such as wage growth, average monthly rent and employment rate, shows which citiesThe 20 best cities for graduate opportunitiesand regions in the UK rank the best in terms of opportunity and affordability for graduates.

The top 20 cities for graduate opportunities are:

1. Liverpool
2. Edinburgh
3. Leicester
4. Bristol
5. Belfast Read more

8 Entry Level Jobs in Industries You Might Not Have Heard Of
March 12, 2019
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With influencers, YouTubers and Artificial Intelligence drastically switching up the career landscapes, there’s no end to the amount of jobs currently available that haven’t been before.

1. AI Ex­pert8 entry level jobs in industries you might not have heard of

Entry level role: IT Support Technician

From voice assistants and chatbots, to smart home devices and robot nannies (yes, really!), AI is reshaping our modern lives and the world as we know it. Scary or exciting?

Either way, artificial intelligence is fast becoming a popular degree choice, and as demands for revolutionary technology increase – and we become more dependent on smart devices – so too will careers in this dynamic field. As a result, AI and machine learning experts will play an increasingly important role in the future of our digital world. Watch this space.

Routes in: You could either start work with a technology, data or AI firm, as a support technician for example, after doing GCSEs or A levels. Alternatively, a higher or degree apprenticeship in IT would point you in the direction, as it means you could continue studying for further qualifications in the industry while also being paid. Read more

Australia: Careers and Industries in Demand
February 8, 2019
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What can the release of the Australian Government’s industry and occupation projections reports tell us about employment trends in Australia over the coming years?

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Industries in demand 

The Industry Employment Projections report from the Department of Jobs and Small Businesses found that 886,100 new jobs will open up in the next five
years to May 2023, signalling a total employment growth of 7.1 per cent. These jobs are expected to grow through turnover rather than net employment growth, due to key factors such as job changes, returning to study, caring for family, retiring and travelling. Employment is predicted to increase in 17 of 19 industries by May 2023, with declines expected in the Wholesale Trade and Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing sectors. The report suggests that Australia is undergoing a structural shift in employment that is concentrated in service industries, with four of these areas being projected to contribute almost two-thirds (or 66.4 per cent) of total employment growth over the next five years.

Healthcare and Social Assistance  Read more

Dstl’s Latest Apprenticeship Opportunities Are Now Open
February 4, 2019
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The Defence Science and Technology Laboratory has a number of new apprenticeship vacancies – see their post on gov.uk below.

At Dstl, we are committed to developing our people, and to investing in the next generation of talent.Apprentices at Dstl

We offer apprenticeships in a variety of roles which enable people to gain experience and an insight into some truly unique work that helps protect the nation. Our apprenticeship programmes range from advanced through to degree level. If you are thinking about your next step in education, or a change of direction in your career, then Dstl could be the place for you.

Choosing an apprenticeship programme gives you a breadth of experience and a qualification and you will earn a salary at the same time.

With a mix of classroom and on-the-job -based learning, our programmes offer you the chance to work on cutting-edge real projects, making a real difference to the defence and security of the UK.

We’re keen to develop even more talent. If you’re passionate about science and technology, eager to help protect the UK and keen to learn, you’ll thrive on one of the following apprenticeships: Read more

Schools and Employers Must Collaborate to Help Young People into Work
September 5, 2018
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Off the back of last week’s GCSE results, research published by HR Magazine, shows parents feel more must be done by employers and schools to provide work experience for young people.

Most parents (82%) believe schools and employers need to work more closely to prepare their children for the workplace, according to research from the Chartered Management Institute (CMI)

The survey also highlighted that despite 78% of parents believing work experience provides the best way for young people to gain employability skills, only 32% agree that employers are actually doing enough to provide that work experience.

Separate CMI research showed that 85% of employers want students to have gained work experience.

It found that parents are roughly as confident about the careers advice they give their children (56%) as they are in that provided by their children’s schools (54%).

Parents’ views play an important role in students’ decision-making. In previous research, 77% of young people said that parents are their number one source of careers advice when leaving school.

Read more

Support For Employers to Promote the 50+ Workforce in the North East
July 16, 2018
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The government has launched a programme, “Retrain, regain, retain – a pilot to support employers and the older workforce.”

The Department for Work and Pensions, in partnership with the North East Local Enterprise Partnership and the National Careers Service (NCS), is offering an opportunity to engage with a range of local businesses to explore how the NCS could provide individuals with better careers and skills advice, and how this might have an impact on the retention, retraining and recruitment workers aged 50 and over.

Benefits of the pilot

Employers that participate will have free access to: Read more

The Best Jobs in Australia for 2018
July 6, 2018
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Global jobs site Indeed has analysed its search data for Australia, uncovering the best local jobs.

Indeed examined tens-of-thousands of job posts to identify well-paid roles that have seen remarkable levels of growth and present great opportunities for job seekers or those considering future career options.

Technology, building and construction, health and medical care are the key areas seeing demand increase.

More than half the roles have average salaries of more than $100,000 and all exceed $80,000.

The number one in-demand job is lead teacher, which has seen extraordinary growth over the past three years amid shortages of more senior level teachers with team leadership experience. The average base salary for a lead teacher is $92,723.

Tech

Full stack developer leads the way in terms of IT jobs growth, followed by data scientist, technology assistant and information systems manager, which are also among the highest paid positions with technology assistant the highest on the list at $141,738 on average. Read more

Degree Returns
July 4, 2018
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The Department for Education and Institute for Fiscal Studies (IfS) published a major new report looking at latest Longitudinal Education Outcomes (LEO) to determine whether studying different types of degree at different types of university affect graduate earnings.

Characteristics determined before students begin HE are important for future earnings, but even after accounting for these characteristics different subjects and institutions have significantly different impacts on the earnings of there students.

Medicine, economics and business are amongst the highest returning courses, with creative arts, philosophy and English amongst the lowest returning courses. This research, uses a new dataset of school, university and tax records created by the Department for Education to investigate returns to different degree courses.

Access The Research Publication Here