NCW: The Future of Work Guide 2021
December 2, 2020
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Navigating the future of work can be daunting and overwhelming, especially when there is so much uncertainty about it, and there are several resources out there.

This guide has mainly been created to help careers advisers and teachers to better navigate and understand the future of work, so in turn, they can help students to better prepare for it. It can also be used by anyone else interested in understanding the future of work.

The guide will focus on the changes to the world of work which are expected to happen due to the Fourth Industrial Revolution and resulting automation.

The guide has been created by Mark Preen, who has ten years of experience as an A-Level Economics teacher, and a strong interest in careers and the future of work. If you have any questions or feedback, then you can contact him at mark_preen@hotmail.com.

Employers Need Government Support to Hire Young People, Report Reveals

Employers need incentives if mass unemployment of young people is to be avoided, said The Institute of Student Employers (ISE).

It raised concerns about the number of young people who will miss out on career opportunities as the economy recovers post-coronavirus. 

In its plan for government, the ISE recommended ways to help employers hire and support young people and make sure the labour market continues to function. 

These include cutting national insurance contributions for all staff under 24 years’ old; securing opportunities in education, apprenticeships and work placements for young people who have been unemployed for six months or more; and bringing more flexibility to company spending of the apprenticeship levy.

ISE chief executive Stephen Isherwood said: “The labour market is breaking down. There is a looming youth unemployment crisis and employers are already facing pressure to slow down or stop entry-level recruitment and slash training costs. 

“These decisions will disproportionately impact young people.”

In May, an ISE report found that UK firms on average will cut entry level recruitment by around a quarter (23%) this year due to challenges related to the pandemic.

For 2021, 60% of firms are currently sure of their recruitment plans and 15% are anticipating a fall in recruitment.

The University Partnerships Programme (UPP) also voiced its concerns around the youth labour market by recommending the launch of a ‘civic army’ to provide work placements for 75,000 young people across the country.

Both organisations recommend government cover the costs of ‘ off-the-job’ study time for all new apprentices under 24-years-old to help support their development. 

Isherwood said: “Employers need support to invest in entry-level talent to recruit and develop young people. The public purse should be used to provide opportunities for young people rather than leaving them to languish unskilled, out of work and left behind.”

Deborah McCormack, ISE chair and head of talent for Pinsent Mason, said no single measure will prevent a loss of talent from the younger generation. “We need a pragmatic package of support from government to help employers and educators enable our early talent, future-proofing the UK economy.” ISE’s recommendations followed the government’s launch of an ‘Office for Talent’ to attract global academic expertise as part of its coronavirus economic recovery plan.

DMH Associates: Newsletter No 2
June 24, 2019
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The latest dmh associates Newsletter is now available. 

It includes:

  • A brief summary of dmh associates selected activities
  • A link to the Special Issue of the British Journal of Guidance and Counselling – Happiness and Wellbeing
  • An article about dmh role in Career-Related Learning in Primary Schools in Northern Ireland
  • Information about the launch of a new major Working Wales initiative
  • An update on the Scottish Careers Strategy
  • Skills NI and the major annual planned 2019 Skills Show
  • Insights into some selected research and evaluation projects
  • Keynote presentations delivered or  being delivered by Deirdre 

View the Newsletter: HERE