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Ofsted News: Issue 84 – October 2019
November 4, 2019
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See the latest Ofsted Newsletter below.

Sections

All Ofsted
Ofsted’s education blog: What is peer-on-peer abuse? – Ofsted’s Sean Harford, National Director for Education, and Yvette Stanley, National Director for Social Care, discuss peer-on-peer abuse: what it is, what schools should be doing when it happens and how we’ve trained our inspectors to recognise it.
Ofsted pen portraits of Her Majesty’s Inspectors (HMIs) – Updated the national lead for mathematics – Emma Gregory.

Schools
Three convicted of running an illegal school – Local authorities were misled into paying thousands of pounds of public money for children to be educated in an unsafe unregistered school, following Ofsted’s investigation.
Home education: a choice or last resort? – Home education is often being chosen by parents of children with complex needs as a last resort. Read our full home education report.
HMCI commentary: the initial teacher education (ITE) curriculum – Ofsted’s Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, Amanda Spielman, discusses upcoming changes to how we inspect ITE partnerships. Read our ITE curriculum literature review.
Ofsted’s education blog: ‘Deep diving’ in small schools – Mike Sheridan, Ofsted’s Regional Director for London, talks about the new education inspection framework (EIF) and how we’ll inspect the curriculum in the smallest schools.
Video: Matthew Purves and James Bowen in conversation – Matthew Purves, Ofsted’s Deputy Director, Schools, talks with James Bowen, Director of NAHT Edge, about school inspection and deep dives.
School inspection data summary report (IDSR) guide – This guide gives an overview of the data contained in the primary IDSR and information to help interpret the charts.
Inspecting non-association independent schools – Updated guidance with details of the EIF.
Independent schools inspection handbook – Updated with minor changes following the launch of the EIF.
Additional inspections of independent schools: handbook for inspectors – Minor updates to reflect the EIF and independent schools handbook.
State-funded school inspections and outcomes: management information – Published management information as at 30 September 2019. Also, updated table one on the excel files for June, July and August 2019 to correct the percentage of schools at each overall effective grade for North East, Yorkshire and the Humber.

Social care
Surveillance and monitoring in residential childcare settings – Information for providers and managers on the use of surveillance, including CCTV, in their residential childcare settings and how Ofsted will evaluate its use.
Ofsted’s social care blog: The Care Experienced Conference – Yvette Stanley, Ofsted’s National Director for Social Care, discusses the Care Experienced Conference reports.
Ofsted’s social care blog: Kinship care: what are the issues? – Yvette Stanley reflects on two recent survey reports of kinship carers’ views.
Ofsted’s social care blog: National Adoption Week 2019 – a time for celebration, and reflection – Yvette Stanley talks about the importance of adoption and how we look at it on our inspections.

Further education and skills
What does the new education inspection framework mean for further education and skills providers? – Ofsted’s Deputy Director for Further Education and Skills, Paul Joyce, talks about what the new EIF means for further education and skills providers.

Early years and childcare
Consented addresses for childminders and domestic childcare – Updated consented addresses for childminders and domestic childcare as at 30 September 2019.
Childcare providers and inspections as at 31 March 2019 – The Excel charts and tables file has been republished for this release. A minor change has been made in the underlying formulae in Table 2. This corrects an error affecting the filters for this table. This amendment has not changed the underlying data for this release. This is also the case for the 31 August 2018 release and the 31 December 2018 release.

ViewPoint: Driving the Quality Improvement Agenda in #APPRENTICESHIPS
October 14, 2019
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The following article is by Louise Doyle, director of Mesma.

Analysis of Ofsted inspections for apprenticeship provision indicates we still have some way to go to ensure we are getting the basics right – regardless of a new inspection framework says Louise Doyle, director of Mesma.

An examination of the latest Ofsted full inspection reports (April – August 2019) reveals several interesting themes. In summary, the profile for apprenticeships delivered by colleges reveals 8 out of 10 received a grade 3 or below. The same applies for 17 of the 26 independent training providers or employer providers.

Louise Doyle, director of Mesma
Louise Doyle, director of Mesma

Under the reports’ leadership section, we are seeing an ambitious vision as a factor among those providers who are achieving good inspections – supported by leaders prepared to take decisive steps to facilitate change where needed. So far; so good.

However, where leadership is struggling, we can see some common threads: weak governance and external scrutiny having a recurring impact. We see leaders who are slow to bring about improvement where there are lower grades and a lack of quality assurance, including inaccurate self-assessment, improvement planning and ineffective use of data. Poor sub-contractor management is clearly evident in those providers judged to be inadequate.

Poor quality progress reviews, a lack of engagement between the employer, the trainer and the trainee feature in the majority of college’s receiving grade three and four for apprenticeship delivery.

It would be remiss of me not to mention the red flag of the moment; not using information gathered at the learner’s start point to inform the program in knowledge, skills and behaviours, and maths and English which is mentioned often. What I will continue to warn against is the risk that a basic check undertaken prior to an apprentice joining the programme to satisfy funding requirements will suffice ‘initial assessment’.

It reminds me of the days when the completion of learning styles questionnaires was routine yet served no meaningful purpose for students. I recall some heated debates with a previous senior leader I reported into about why we shouldn’t be doing them because they were pointless. I’m glad the research now backs this up. I hope he’s seen it.

When it comes to quality of education, learners receiving good teaching, learning and assessment and support to improve those areas where things are going well. Good assessment practice, targets and feedback are features of those higher-grade reports.

However, issues around consistency still prevail. Weakness of assessment practice, target setting and feedback feature year after year as issues we need to address to improve the quality of provision. The impact of poorly delivered English and Maths features frequently when the grades are lower which won’t be a surprise to any of us.

Bucking the trend

Turning to HE institutions, our universities appear to be bucking the trend that ITPs and FE colleges are experiencing in terms of grade profile. All but 1 of the 9 HEIs inspected were graded as ‘Good’. It is to be applauded that many university senior leaders have been able to clearly articulate the importance of apprenticeships to widening participation and strategic direction more generally.

However, it’s not all sunshine and light because we are seeing some elements of HE senior leadership also failing to have sufficient oversight of quality management.

I don’t think I’m being unfair in stating that some of this success is due to the high volumes of programmes being delivered in the health service, where supervision of new staff is part of the employer’s fabric. This isn’t a criticism; it’s evidence of the important role employers play in driving quality apprenticeship delivery.

Looking at the Ofsted reports also reminds us why providers should quality assure their quality assurance systems to ensure they are doing what you need them to do. Sometimes, it seems like there’s so much quality assurance activity going on that we’re patting ourselves on the back because we do it, rather than reflecting on whether that particular process has an impact. If you do it, how do you use the data to drive improvement? If it doesn’t, why do it? Our clients are often surprised at our quest to strip back their QA rather than pad it out.

So, regardless of the changes being brought in by the new Ofsted framework, it’s clear that there are still some fundamental basics that can be improved to drive improvement across the spectrum. As our colleagues at Ofsted have themselves said, this is not about dancing to the tune of a new framework. Yes, let’s understand the new process of inspection but it doesn’t really change what a good apprenticeship looks like does it?

Ofsted News: Issue 83 – September 2019
October 1, 2019
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See the latest Ofsted Newsletter below.

The education inspection framework (EIF) is now in place. We have published updated copies of the following handbooks to support inspections under the new framework:

We have also updated the safeguarding guidance for inspectors to accompany the launch of the EIF.

What’s changing at Ofsted in autumn 2019? – A round-up of changes to some of the Ofsted services and GOV.UK pages.

Schools
HMCI commentary: managing behaviour research – Ofsted’s Chief Inspector, Amanda Spielman, summarises our findings so far on managing behaviour in schools and our future projects.
Ofsted’s education blog: Prosecution means protection: investigating and prosecuting unregistered schools – Sean Harford, Ofsted’s National Director for Education, talks about our latest unregistered school prosecution and the work of our unregistered schools taskforce.
Presentation: EIF and deep dives – Matthew Purves, Ofsted’s Deputy Director, Schools Policy, gave this presentation on the EIF and deep dives at Herts Assessment’s conference on 23 September 2019.
School inspection update: academic year 2019 to 2020 – Updated the article on using progress 8 data.
Inspecting schools: guidance for parents – Updated to reflect the EIF.
Inspecting schools: guide for maintained and academy schools – Added the leaflet for maintained schools and academies to prepare for an inspection.
Selecting new schools for inspection – This guide gives a summary of how we select new schools to inspect, including free schools and academies.
Risk assessment methodology for maintained schools and academies – The method we use to assess when to inspect maintained schools and academies rated good or outstanding.
Non-association independent schools inspections and outcomes: management information – Published management information as at 31 July 2019.
Using Ofsted’s inspection data summary report (IDSR): early years foundation stage profile to key stage 4 – Updated the details section and added new prototype for primary IDSRs.
State-funded school inspections and outcomes: management information – Published management information as at 31 August 2019.

Social Care
Ofsted’s social care blog: Inspection of local authority children’s services (ILACS) implementation review – how are our children’s services inspections working? – Yvette Stanley, Ofsted’s National Director for Social Care, discusses how our children’s services inspections are working.
ILACS framework: implementation review – This report evaluates the extent to which the ILACS framework has been implemented as intended.
Social care common inspection framework (SCCIF) – Minor updates to all SCCIF handbooks including additional guidance for inspectors in the ‘Listening and talking to children and young people’ sections and updated guidance in the ‘Conduct during inspections’ sections.
Fostering and adoption agency datasets – Published dataset as at 31 March 2019.

Further Education and Skills
Risk assessment methodology for further education and skills providers – The method we use to assess when to inspect further education and skills providers rated good or outstanding.
Further education and skills inspections and outcomes: management information from September 2018 to August 2019 – Added management information as at 31 August 2019.

Early Years and Childcare
Accessibility statement: ‘register as a childminder’ service – This accessibility statement is for our ‘register as a childminder’ digital service.
Consented addresses for childminders and domestic childcare – Updated consented addresses for childminders and domestic childcare as at 31 August 2019.

New Ofsted Board Members
July 24, 2019
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The Department for Education has announced two new appointments and a re-appointment to the Ofsted Board.

The Department for Education (DfE) announced the appointment of 5 new non-executive members of the Ofsted Board: Julie Kirkbride, Hamid Patel CBE, Martin Spencer, Carole Stott MBE, Baroness Laura Wyld.

The DfE also announced the re-appointment of existing board members John Cridland and Venessa Wilms.

Martin and Laura have been appointed for a 4 year period and Julie, Hamid and Carole for a 3 year period.

These appointments follow a joint process run by the DfE and Ofsted between January and May. We received over 400 applications of which 18 were interviewed by an Advisory Assessment Panel.

Julius Weinberg, Chair of the Ofsted Board, said:

I am delighted to welcome Carole, Hamid, Julie, Laura and Martin to the Ofsted board; their expertise, experience and passion will be of great value to us. I am also delighted that John and Venessa are remaining with us; their retention ensures continuity and that we continue to benefit from their knowledge and expertise.

We already have a strong Board at Ofsted; our new members will bring perspectives and knowledge that will help as we continue to support the Executive team in the important role we perform.

Read the full appointment announcement for July on GOV.UK.

ViewPoint: What Ofsted’s New Inspection Framework Means for FE by Billy Camden
May 14, 2019
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Ofsted has today published its new and final education inspection framework that will come into effect from September.

It follows a three-month public consultation, which prompted more than 15,000 responses – the highest number the education watchdog has ever received. Read more

Amanda Spielman Speech at the 2019 Annual Apprenticeships Conference
March 28, 2019
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The Chief Inspector discussed the apprenticeship landscape, current challenges that providers face and Ofsted’s approach.Amanda Spielman

The following speech was delivered on 27 March 2019 (Transcript of the speech, exactly as it was delivered)

Introduction

To say that the last few years have marked monumental changes for the apprenticeship market is no exaggeration. We have seen the introduction of the levy, standards, the off-the-job training quota, and of course degree apprenticeships – to name just a few.

This is a heady mix, and understandably, the sector’s had to work hard to adjust.

Since I spoke to you last year, apprenticeships remain in the headlines, and not always for the right reasons. The continuing fall in starts, highlighted again by the National Audit Office (NAO) earlier this month, is still a major cause for concern.

I am well aware that apprenticeship providers have a lot to contend with. The wider context that means that many of you are struggling to make apprenticeships available.

Read more

Ofsted Blog: What Ofsted Looks at When it Comes to Careers Education, Information, Advice and Guidance
March 21, 2019
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Julie Ashton, senior Her Majesty’s inspector, and Nigel Bragg, Her Majesty’s inspector, explain why good-quality careers guidance should be available to helpOfstedyoung people make informed decisions, and outline what Ofsted looks at in inspections when it comes to careers education.

Not so long ago, the career decisions we made as teenagers set us on a path that lasted until we received our free bus pass. For many, the days when we had a job for life are now long gone, yet it’s fair to say that the career decisions we make as young adults are still important.

We can all agree that careers guidance matters. Schools and colleges have a vital role in preparing pupils and young people for life beyond education, and that is not just limited to exam grades. Read more

How to do Well In the New Ofsted
February 13, 2019
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The following blog was posted

We invited Ofsted in to our school this week to support the pilot of the new framework, which will come into play in September. The framework is currently open for consultation, and you can find out more information here.

First up, I do need to give some context to this post. This is my own personal opinion and experience of the process. As a school and as a leadership team, we found the process to be a generally positive one, though one which was thorough and challenging. I am keen to emphasise, though, that follows is very much my own personal reflection, as AHT for Upper KS2 and the school’s Curriculum leader. It is also worth noting that is this was a two-day pilot inspection, the actual final framework may or may not differ from this experience.

I want to keep this as a brief and snappy post, so here we go.

We didn’t talk data; we really talked curriculum

Read more

Further Education and Skills Inspection Handbook
September 5, 2018
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This handbook describes the main activities Ofsted inspectors undertake when they inspect further education and skills providers.
Ofsted

It sets out the main judgements that inspectors will report on. It can also be used by providers and other organisations to inform themselves about inspection processes and procedures The handbook is to be used alongside the Common inspection framework: education, skills and early years’.

The mythbuster document sets out facts about Ofsted’s requirements and dispels myths that can result in unnecessary workloads in colleges.

 

Documents

ESFA Confirm, Ofsted will Have the Final Say on Poor-Performing Apprenticeship Providers
August 22, 2018
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In a move that was predicted by many in the sector, the government has decided that Ofsted will have the decisive say over poor-performing providers. 

They will now be expected to visit every new apprenticeship provider. They will receive £7 million in extra funding to make this possible.

According to the ESFA’s Removal from register of apprenticeship training providers and eligibility to receive public funding to deliver apprenticeship training’‘ updated today, any provider making ‘insufficient progress’ in at least one of the themes under review will be barred from taking on any new apprentices – either directly or through a subcontracting arrangement.

They can continue to work with existing apprentices, but must tell the employers, and any lead providers, about the monitoring visit outcome.

These restrictions will remain in place until the provider has received a full inspection and been awarded at least a grade three for its apprenticeship provision.

The ESFA can only overrule this guidance if it “identifies an exceptional extenuating circumstance”.