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Ofsted News: Issue 87 – February 2020
March 2, 2020
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Sections

All Ofsted
Ofsted pen portraits of Her Majesty’s Inspectors (HMIs) – We have updated some of the North West and West Midlands HMI pen portraits. 

Schools
School inspection data summary report (IDSR) guide – Updated to include: final 2019 early years foundation stage (EYFS) information, supporting tables with revised key stage 2 information, data for disadvantaged pupils, and a new master list of all 2019 areas of interest sentences. 
Statistical data set: Non-association independent schools inspections and outcomes: management information – Published management information as at 31 December 2019.
Statistical data set: State-funded school inspections and outcomes: management information – Published management information as at 31 January 2020.
Blog post: Curriculum transition extended for a year – Sean Harford, Ofsted’s National Director for Education, talks about our curriculum transition arrangements and announces an extension.
Commentary on school funding – Amanda Spielman, Ofsted’s Chief Inspector, provides a commentary on what we found in our research into school funding and its impact on education. You can read our full report on this research: ‘Making the cut: how schools respond when they are under financial pressure’. This report summarises the findings from a qualitative research project we carried out in 2018–19. 
Statistical data set: Ofsted Parent View: management information – Published management information as at 6 January 2020.

Social care
Blog post – adoption: Let’s prioritise children, whatever their needs – Yvette Stanley, Director, Social Care, talks about how policy and practice have to make sure that all children receive the right support at the right time. 
Unseen evil: sex abuse in families going under the radar, say inspectorates – We published a joint report (with the Care Quality Commission, Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire and Rescue Services and HMI Probation). The report explains our findings from joint targeted area inspections of ‘The multi-agency response to child sexual abuse in the family environment’
Ofsted launches point-in-time surveys – We have sent surveys to social care providers to find out about the experiences of the children, parents, staff and professionals involved. We have also published guidance about distributing the 2020 annual surveys and a promotional poster that providers can use.
Transparency data: Inspection outcomes of children’s homes – Published children’s homes management information for inspections carried out between 1 September 2019 and 31 December 2019.
Commentary: creating the environment for excellence in residential practice – Yvette Stanley shares what a sample of consistently good and outstanding children’s homes do to maintain their success.
National Statistics: Fostering in England 1 April 2018 to 31 March 2019 – Note added to ‘Fostering data in England 2018-19’ to clarify what we include in the number of households approved in year.
Joint inspections of child exploitation – Minor update. Timeline in Annex A updated to show 10 working days’ notification before fieldwork. Also updated evaluative questions in the tool for tracking children’s experiences in Annex B.

Further education and skills
Blog post: Apprenticeships and the skills gap post-Brexit – Ofsted’s Deputy Director for Further Education and Skills, Paul Joyce, talks about apprenticeships and the skills gap post-Brexit. 
Statistical data set: Further education and skills inspections and outcomes: management information from September 2019 to August 2020 – Published inspection data as at 31 January 2020.

Early years and childcare
Non-compliance with the Early Years and Childcare Registers – An explanation of what happens to those judged inadequate on the Early Years Register and those not meeting registration requirements on the Childcare Register. 
Pay your Ofsted annual registration fee by direct debit – On this page, you can download and complete the direct debit form to pay your Ofsted annual registration fee.
Transparency data: Consented addresses for childminders and domestic childcare – Updated consented addresses for childminders and domestic childcare as at 31 January 2020.
Report a serious childcare incident – Ofsted-registered childminders, nannies, nurseries and other daycare must use this service to report significant events affecting their childcare within 14 days.
Providing childcare and the 2-hour rule – Find out how you can still register with Ofsted if you provide childcare immediately before or after school for less than 2 hours in a day.
Childcare: reporting children’s accidents and injuries – Find out whether you need to tell Ofsted about an accident, injury or illness a child suffers while in your care.
Apply to register as a childminder – You must apply to register with Ofsted if you want to look after other people’s children in your home or someone else’s home. This page explains the process.
Apply to register as a nanny – You can apply to register as a nanny, including as an au pair, with Ofsted if you want to look after other people’s children in their home. This page explains the process.
Childminders: report new adults in the home – You must tell Ofsted about new people aged 16 or over who live or work in the home you look after children in within 14 days. This includes children who turn 16. This page explains the process.
Carrying out Childcare Register inspections – This guidance is for Ofsted inspectors carrying out inspections of providers that are only registered on either or both parts of the Childcare Register. We publish it on our website to be transparent. 

Free AELP Webinar: The Education Inspection Framework and SEND Learners
February 17, 2020
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Facilitated by: Marina Gaze, former Ofsted Director for FE and Skills 

Date: Thursday, 20 February 2020 | Time: 10.30 am – 11.30 am GMT

Overview 

The Further Education and Skills Handbook 2019 says: 

Before making the final judgement on overall effectiveness, inspectors must evaluate the extent to which the education and training provided meets the needs of all learners. This includes learners with SEND and those who have high needs.’ 

This statement makes it very clear that Ofsted sees learners and apprentices with SEND as hugely important. In this webinar, you’ll hear how to improve the quality of provision for learners with SEND, what Ofsted expects from providers and how to deliver it using Cognassist.

Objectives 

You’ll learn more about:

  • how SEND learners are now high profile in the EIF
  • why you should ensure that you quickly identify any additional learning support needs and plan learning to meet these needs
  • why it’s important to individualise learning and support to meet learners’ needs and help them embed concepts into their long-term memory
  • why impact is so important and how you can help learners improve, develop and achieve
Who should attend?

This webinar will be of interest to ITPs, Employers, FE, LA and NHS and the following staff in these roles: Quality Director, Quality Manager, Head of Quality, Head of Apprentices, Learning Manager, Head of Department, CEO, VP, MD.

Delegate Fees

This webinar is sponsored by Cognassist and therefore complimentary to attendIt is an alternative date for people who could not attend the same session which was run by Cognassist on the 13th February. 

Package

Access to the live webinar and/or recording, slides and Q&As after the webinar. If you cannot attend the live webinar, you will automatically be sent a link to the recording afterwards if you stay registered.

Register using the link below.

Book Here

Ofsted Chief Inspector Warns Against Pursuing Success Without Substance
January 23, 2020
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This year’s annual report finds the overall quality of education and care in England is good and improving, but chief inspector warns against complacency.

Image result for amanda spielman

Launching her third Annual Report as Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, Amanda Spielman said today (21 Jan) that the great majority of schools, colleges, nurseries and child minders in England are good or outstanding, reflecting the hard work of teachers, leaders and support staff who work there.

  • 86% of schools are judged to be good or outstanding
  • 96% of early years (EY) providers are good or outstanding
  • 81% of inspected further education and skills (FES) providers are good or outstanding

This year’s Annual Report also highlights improving developments in children’s social care, with 48% of local authority children services now rated good or outstanding, while 84% of children’s homes, fostering and adoption agencies, residential special schools and other social care providers returned a good or outstanding grade in their most recent inspections.

Ofsted’s core job is to inspect, regulate and report objectively. The Annual Report provides a summary of findings from thousands of inspections and visits and research published over the past year. It presents a ‘state of the nation’ commentary on the quality of education, training and children’s social care services in England. Ofsted is the only independent body that can provide this view across England.

It’s important not to let complacency creep in

However, the Annual Report warns that a minority of schools and other education providers continue to make decisions in their own best interests, rather than those of their learners. This includes various forms of ‘gaming’ that seek to maximise the school’s attainment data and league table positions.

Ofsted is concerned that these providers are failing to act with integrity or focus on what really matters. As a result, some children – particularly the most disadvantaged – are not being well prepared for adult life. 

Speaking to an audience of education and social care professionals and policy experts in Westminster, Ms Spielman said that, while the overall picture is good and improving, it’s important not to let complacency creep in.

Amanda Spielman100x100

Ms Spielman said:

It’s important that we don’t allow complacency to creep in. We must ask the tough questions and highlight inadequacy, as well as excellence.

… So, as we look at the high standards of education and good quality care that most are achieving, we must ask: what lies beneath? Away from the excellent work going on in many places, what is getting in the way of further and faster improvement – and what does that mean for our children?

Ofsted launched a new education inspection framework (EIF) in September 2019, which put the quality of the curriculum at the centre of its approach, with less focus on performance data. Since then, there has been a real shift in emphasis in schools. School leaders and teachers have widely welcomed Ofsted’s new approach and the opportunities it has given them to think carefully about their curriculum, and make sure it gives every child the chance to acquire the same knowledge and learning.

We must guard against restricting education excessively. Exam results are important but have to reflect real achievement. We should not incentivise apparent success without substance. This doesn’t represent a good education for any child. And for those who aren’t being read a different story every night, who aren’t taken to the museum at the weekend, who don’t get the chemistry set for Christmas, it is especially impoverished. These children need and deserve a proper, substantial, broad education, for as long as schools have them.

We recently inspected a school that had been requiring every child to take a sports science qualification, using up a valuable GCSE slot, whether or not they had any interest in sports science at all. We’ve seen schools requiring almost every child to take a qualification in English for Speakers of Other Languages, even though they were nearly all native English speakers who were also taking English Language and Literature GCSEs.

We’ve seen schools that have been cutting back drastically on all children’s opportunities to discover the joys of languages, art, music, drama and humanities – so that most children have to give them up at age 12 or 13, when they have barely begun to discover what these subjects have to offer.

… We mustn’t succumb to the seductive but wrong-headed logic that we help disadvantaged children by turning a blind eye to schools that narrow education in this way, as long as they deliver acceptable grades at the end. Grades are hollow if they don’t reflect a proper education underneath. And we have no idea yet who the most talented and singular women and men are, who will drive this country forward in the 2030s, 40s and 50s. They could be in any primary or secondary school anywhere. All of them should have the chance to develop their talents. Poorer children shouldn’t get a worse choice.

Regarding Further Education and Skills

At the other end of the age range, the discussion of further education and skills (FES) has taken on extra significance. In 10 days, the UK will leave the European Union and start to plot its future trading relationship with Europe and the rest of the world.

Now, more than ever, we must think strategically about skills and how the further education sector is funded and encouraged to provide the right courses of the right quality.

I’m not happy that some colleges steer too many of their students towards superficially attractive courses that fill their rolls and attract funding – whether or not they open doors for the students who take them.

This doesn’t mean the courses young people are taking are completely worthless. But flooding a local job market with young people with (say) low-level arts and media qualifications, when the big growth in demand is for green energy workers, will result in too many under-employed and dissatisfied young people and wind turbines left idle.

We need a clearer focus on matching skills to opportunities. Not just for Brexit. Many FE providers operate in places the government says it wants to ‘level up’. What better way to level up than to radically improve the quality of vocational and skills education in our towns? But it does also mean tackling the small minority of colleges that have under-performed or been ‘stuck’ for years.

Apprenticeships have become a much larger part of our post-16 work. Over the last two years, the number of further education and skills institutions has grown by over 60%. Most of the growth has been in independent learning providers (ILPs), who offer the majority of apprenticeships. Their numbers have more than doubled to 1,200. Remember, there are fewer than 200 general FE colleges.

And our inspections tell us that too many providers are not clear about the purpose of their apprenticeships. The quality of courses is still sometimes too low and the proportion of ILPs judged good or outstanding declined this year, for the third year in succession. This needs to change.

Changes to the funding model and the introduction of the levy have driven growth in the number of providers, but they’ve also bent apprenticeships out of shape. Even with more providers, the overall number of apprentices has dropped – and this has a particular impact on younger age-groups.

Apprenticeships can be transformational for young people. And yet one in five of all new levy-funded apprenticeships are higher- and degree-level, often aimed at people who are already doing the job, or who don’t need the leg up that a great entry-level apprenticeship can provide.

Meanwhile, there are more than twice as many apprentices in business and retail as there are in the priority areas of construction and engineering.

The government and providers must look at what can be done to redress the balance across apprenticeships. The critical 16 to 19 age-group needs to be better catered for and decisions must be made about how to reverse the decline in school leavers taking up apprenticeships.

More generally, there is clearly room for greater targeting of government funding in post-16 education of all kinds.

Other concerns highlighted in this year’s Annual Report include:

  • Ofsted continues to be worried about the number of pupils leaving schools during their GCSE years. Twenty thousand pupils left their state-funded secondary schools between Year 10 (2017) and Year 11 (2018). There are 340 schools with exceptional levels of pupil movement, of which around 100 have been inspected this year.
  • This year, Ofsted’s unregistered schools task force provided the evidence for three successful convictions of illegal schools and their operators. However, legal constraints still make it too easy for illegal schools to operate in defiance of the law. Ofsted urgently need stronger powers to seize documents and the Government needs to tighten the legal definition of a school and of full-time education.
  • Ofsted’s inspections of provision for children and young people with special educational needs and/or disabilities (SEND) has exposed a lack of coherence and coordination. Local leaders across education, health and care do not always see themselves as collectively accountable for this provision. Too often, parents encounter fractures in assessment and planning. In these cases, the system is not working well as a whole to make the best decisions and achieve the best outcomes for children and young people.
  • Local authority children’s services continue to endure significant financial pressures. Challenges across children’s services are underpinned by a chronic lack of funding, set against increasing demand.
  • The children’s home sector is facing huge challenges in sufficiency and capability, which need national oversight and strategic leadership. There are not enough children’s homes in the right places across the country, and there is no central joined-up strategy or plan to meet children’s needs.
  • In the FES sector, there has been rapid growth in the number of new apprenticeship training providers. However, a gap remains between the knowledge and skills required for the economy and current provision, in particular in relation to training for low-skilled workers. The sector needs to work much more in tandem with the government’s Industrial Strategy.
  • The early years sector has seen a continued decline in the number of childminders. Meanwhile, more and more nurseries are joining large national and international providers, but are inspected individually. These nurseries are more likely to be rated outstanding, which suggests that strong practice can be shared effectively across the whole nursery chain. There may be benefits from a different inspection model that would allow individual inspections of nurseries to be brought together and features across the whole chain to be analysed.
  • Increasingly, decisions that affect children’s education and care are being made by central management in large multi academy trusts, nursery operators or children’s home operators. Decisions about the curriculum, the model of care, staffing, safeguarding and behaviour policies go to the heart of what Ofsted needs to consider through inspection and regulation, but the legal framework for accountability is not keeping up with the evolution of the education and care sectors.

In the coming year, Ofsted will look more closely at some of these areas to see if things can be done differently to improve outcomes for children.

Ofsted News: Issue 84 – October 2019
November 4, 2019
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See the latest Ofsted Newsletter below.

Sections

All Ofsted
Ofsted’s education blog: What is peer-on-peer abuse? – Ofsted’s Sean Harford, National Director for Education, and Yvette Stanley, National Director for Social Care, discuss peer-on-peer abuse: what it is, what schools should be doing when it happens and how we’ve trained our inspectors to recognise it.
Ofsted pen portraits of Her Majesty’s Inspectors (HMIs) – Updated the national lead for mathematics – Emma Gregory.

Schools
Three convicted of running an illegal school – Local authorities were misled into paying thousands of pounds of public money for children to be educated in an unsafe unregistered school, following Ofsted’s investigation.
Home education: a choice or last resort? – Home education is often being chosen by parents of children with complex needs as a last resort. Read our full home education report.
HMCI commentary: the initial teacher education (ITE) curriculum – Ofsted’s Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, Amanda Spielman, discusses upcoming changes to how we inspect ITE partnerships. Read our ITE curriculum literature review.
Ofsted’s education blog: ‘Deep diving’ in small schools – Mike Sheridan, Ofsted’s Regional Director for London, talks about the new education inspection framework (EIF) and how we’ll inspect the curriculum in the smallest schools.
Video: Matthew Purves and James Bowen in conversation – Matthew Purves, Ofsted’s Deputy Director, Schools, talks with James Bowen, Director of NAHT Edge, about school inspection and deep dives.
School inspection data summary report (IDSR) guide – This guide gives an overview of the data contained in the primary IDSR and information to help interpret the charts.
Inspecting non-association independent schools – Updated guidance with details of the EIF.
Independent schools inspection handbook – Updated with minor changes following the launch of the EIF.
Additional inspections of independent schools: handbook for inspectors – Minor updates to reflect the EIF and independent schools handbook.
State-funded school inspections and outcomes: management information – Published management information as at 30 September 2019. Also, updated table one on the excel files for June, July and August 2019 to correct the percentage of schools at each overall effective grade for North East, Yorkshire and the Humber.

Social care
Surveillance and monitoring in residential childcare settings – Information for providers and managers on the use of surveillance, including CCTV, in their residential childcare settings and how Ofsted will evaluate its use.
Ofsted’s social care blog: The Care Experienced Conference – Yvette Stanley, Ofsted’s National Director for Social Care, discusses the Care Experienced Conference reports.
Ofsted’s social care blog: Kinship care: what are the issues? – Yvette Stanley reflects on two recent survey reports of kinship carers’ views.
Ofsted’s social care blog: National Adoption Week 2019 – a time for celebration, and reflection – Yvette Stanley talks about the importance of adoption and how we look at it on our inspections.

Further education and skills
What does the new education inspection framework mean for further education and skills providers? – Ofsted’s Deputy Director for Further Education and Skills, Paul Joyce, talks about what the new EIF means for further education and skills providers.

Early years and childcare
Consented addresses for childminders and domestic childcare – Updated consented addresses for childminders and domestic childcare as at 30 September 2019.
Childcare providers and inspections as at 31 March 2019 – The Excel charts and tables file has been republished for this release. A minor change has been made in the underlying formulae in Table 2. This corrects an error affecting the filters for this table. This amendment has not changed the underlying data for this release. This is also the case for the 31 August 2018 release and the 31 December 2018 release.

ViewPoint: Driving the Quality Improvement Agenda in #APPRENTICESHIPS
October 14, 2019
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The following article is by Louise Doyle, director of Mesma.

Analysis of Ofsted inspections for apprenticeship provision indicates we still have some way to go to ensure we are getting the basics right – regardless of a new inspection framework says Louise Doyle, director of Mesma.

An examination of the latest Ofsted full inspection reports (April – August 2019) reveals several interesting themes. In summary, the profile for apprenticeships delivered by colleges reveals 8 out of 10 received a grade 3 or below. The same applies for 17 of the 26 independent training providers or employer providers.

Louise Doyle, director of Mesma
Louise Doyle, director of Mesma

Under the reports’ leadership section, we are seeing an ambitious vision as a factor among those providers who are achieving good inspections – supported by leaders prepared to take decisive steps to facilitate change where needed. So far; so good.

However, where leadership is struggling, we can see some common threads: weak governance and external scrutiny having a recurring impact. We see leaders who are slow to bring about improvement where there are lower grades and a lack of quality assurance, including inaccurate self-assessment, improvement planning and ineffective use of data. Poor sub-contractor management is clearly evident in those providers judged to be inadequate.

Poor quality progress reviews, a lack of engagement between the employer, the trainer and the trainee feature in the majority of college’s receiving grade three and four for apprenticeship delivery.

It would be remiss of me not to mention the red flag of the moment; not using information gathered at the learner’s start point to inform the program in knowledge, skills and behaviours, and maths and English which is mentioned often. What I will continue to warn against is the risk that a basic check undertaken prior to an apprentice joining the programme to satisfy funding requirements will suffice ‘initial assessment’.

It reminds me of the days when the completion of learning styles questionnaires was routine yet served no meaningful purpose for students. I recall some heated debates with a previous senior leader I reported into about why we shouldn’t be doing them because they were pointless. I’m glad the research now backs this up. I hope he’s seen it.

When it comes to quality of education, learners receiving good teaching, learning and assessment and support to improve those areas where things are going well. Good assessment practice, targets and feedback are features of those higher-grade reports.

However, issues around consistency still prevail. Weakness of assessment practice, target setting and feedback feature year after year as issues we need to address to improve the quality of provision. The impact of poorly delivered English and Maths features frequently when the grades are lower which won’t be a surprise to any of us.

Bucking the trend

Turning to HE institutions, our universities appear to be bucking the trend that ITPs and FE colleges are experiencing in terms of grade profile. All but 1 of the 9 HEIs inspected were graded as ‘Good’. It is to be applauded that many university senior leaders have been able to clearly articulate the importance of apprenticeships to widening participation and strategic direction more generally.

However, it’s not all sunshine and light because we are seeing some elements of HE senior leadership also failing to have sufficient oversight of quality management.

I don’t think I’m being unfair in stating that some of this success is due to the high volumes of programmes being delivered in the health service, where supervision of new staff is part of the employer’s fabric. This isn’t a criticism; it’s evidence of the important role employers play in driving quality apprenticeship delivery.

Looking at the Ofsted reports also reminds us why providers should quality assure their quality assurance systems to ensure they are doing what you need them to do. Sometimes, it seems like there’s so much quality assurance activity going on that we’re patting ourselves on the back because we do it, rather than reflecting on whether that particular process has an impact. If you do it, how do you use the data to drive improvement? If it doesn’t, why do it? Our clients are often surprised at our quest to strip back their QA rather than pad it out.

So, regardless of the changes being brought in by the new Ofsted framework, it’s clear that there are still some fundamental basics that can be improved to drive improvement across the spectrum. As our colleagues at Ofsted have themselves said, this is not about dancing to the tune of a new framework. Yes, let’s understand the new process of inspection but it doesn’t really change what a good apprenticeship looks like does it?

Ofsted News: Issue 83 – September 2019
October 1, 2019
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See the latest Ofsted Newsletter below.

The education inspection framework (EIF) is now in place. We have published updated copies of the following handbooks to support inspections under the new framework:

We have also updated the safeguarding guidance for inspectors to accompany the launch of the EIF.

What’s changing at Ofsted in autumn 2019? – A round-up of changes to some of the Ofsted services and GOV.UK pages.

Schools
HMCI commentary: managing behaviour research – Ofsted’s Chief Inspector, Amanda Spielman, summarises our findings so far on managing behaviour in schools and our future projects.
Ofsted’s education blog: Prosecution means protection: investigating and prosecuting unregistered schools – Sean Harford, Ofsted’s National Director for Education, talks about our latest unregistered school prosecution and the work of our unregistered schools taskforce.
Presentation: EIF and deep dives – Matthew Purves, Ofsted’s Deputy Director, Schools Policy, gave this presentation on the EIF and deep dives at Herts Assessment’s conference on 23 September 2019.
School inspection update: academic year 2019 to 2020 – Updated the article on using progress 8 data.
Inspecting schools: guidance for parents – Updated to reflect the EIF.
Inspecting schools: guide for maintained and academy schools – Added the leaflet for maintained schools and academies to prepare for an inspection.
Selecting new schools for inspection – This guide gives a summary of how we select new schools to inspect, including free schools and academies.
Risk assessment methodology for maintained schools and academies – The method we use to assess when to inspect maintained schools and academies rated good or outstanding.
Non-association independent schools inspections and outcomes: management information – Published management information as at 31 July 2019.
Using Ofsted’s inspection data summary report (IDSR): early years foundation stage profile to key stage 4 – Updated the details section and added new prototype for primary IDSRs.
State-funded school inspections and outcomes: management information – Published management information as at 31 August 2019.

Social Care
Ofsted’s social care blog: Inspection of local authority children’s services (ILACS) implementation review – how are our children’s services inspections working? – Yvette Stanley, Ofsted’s National Director for Social Care, discusses how our children’s services inspections are working.
ILACS framework: implementation review – This report evaluates the extent to which the ILACS framework has been implemented as intended.
Social care common inspection framework (SCCIF) – Minor updates to all SCCIF handbooks including additional guidance for inspectors in the ‘Listening and talking to children and young people’ sections and updated guidance in the ‘Conduct during inspections’ sections.
Fostering and adoption agency datasets – Published dataset as at 31 March 2019.

Further Education and Skills
Risk assessment methodology for further education and skills providers – The method we use to assess when to inspect further education and skills providers rated good or outstanding.
Further education and skills inspections and outcomes: management information from September 2018 to August 2019 – Added management information as at 31 August 2019.

Early Years and Childcare
Accessibility statement: ‘register as a childminder’ service – This accessibility statement is for our ‘register as a childminder’ digital service.
Consented addresses for childminders and domestic childcare – Updated consented addresses for childminders and domestic childcare as at 31 August 2019.

New Ofsted Board Members
July 24, 2019
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The Department for Education has announced two new appointments and a re-appointment to the Ofsted Board.

The Department for Education (DfE) announced the appointment of 5 new non-executive members of the Ofsted Board: Julie Kirkbride, Hamid Patel CBE, Martin Spencer, Carole Stott MBE, Baroness Laura Wyld.

The DfE also announced the re-appointment of existing board members John Cridland and Venessa Wilms.

Martin and Laura have been appointed for a 4 year period and Julie, Hamid and Carole for a 3 year period.

These appointments follow a joint process run by the DfE and Ofsted between January and May. We received over 400 applications of which 18 were interviewed by an Advisory Assessment Panel.

Julius Weinberg, Chair of the Ofsted Board, said:

I am delighted to welcome Carole, Hamid, Julie, Laura and Martin to the Ofsted board; their expertise, experience and passion will be of great value to us. I am also delighted that John and Venessa are remaining with us; their retention ensures continuity and that we continue to benefit from their knowledge and expertise.

We already have a strong Board at Ofsted; our new members will bring perspectives and knowledge that will help as we continue to support the Executive team in the important role we perform.

Read the full appointment announcement for July on GOV.UK.

ViewPoint: What Ofsted’s New Inspection Framework Means for FE by Billy Camden
May 14, 2019
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Ofsted has today published its new and final education inspection framework that will come into effect from September.

It follows a three-month public consultation, which prompted more than 15,000 responses – the highest number the education watchdog has ever received. Read more

Amanda Spielman Speech at the 2019 Annual Apprenticeships Conference
March 28, 2019
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The Chief Inspector discussed the apprenticeship landscape, current challenges that providers face and Ofsted’s approach.Amanda Spielman

The following speech was delivered on 27 March 2019 (Transcript of the speech, exactly as it was delivered)

Introduction

To say that the last few years have marked monumental changes for the apprenticeship market is no exaggeration. We have seen the introduction of the levy, standards, the off-the-job training quota, and of course degree apprenticeships – to name just a few.

This is a heady mix, and understandably, the sector’s had to work hard to adjust.

Since I spoke to you last year, apprenticeships remain in the headlines, and not always for the right reasons. The continuing fall in starts, highlighted again by the National Audit Office (NAO) earlier this month, is still a major cause for concern.

I am well aware that apprenticeship providers have a lot to contend with. The wider context that means that many of you are struggling to make apprenticeships available.

Read more

Ofsted Blog: What Ofsted Looks at When it Comes to Careers Education, Information, Advice and Guidance
March 21, 2019
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Julie Ashton, senior Her Majesty’s inspector, and Nigel Bragg, Her Majesty’s inspector, explain why good-quality careers guidance should be available to helpOfstedyoung people make informed decisions, and outline what Ofsted looks at in inspections when it comes to careers education.

Not so long ago, the career decisions we made as teenagers set us on a path that lasted until we received our free bus pass. For many, the days when we had a job for life are now long gone, yet it’s fair to say that the career decisions we make as young adults are still important.

We can all agree that careers guidance matters. Schools and colleges have a vital role in preparing pupils and young people for life beyond education, and that is not just limited to exam grades. Read more