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Employees Feel Too Old For Apprenticeships
September 17, 2019
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Many employees would like the opportunity to start an apprenticeship or switch career but are worried they’re too old, according to Jobrapido.

Its research found that more than half (52%) of UK employees would readily embark on an apprenticeship if it could support a career change or move them to a different industry sector.

Of those that wouldn’t embark on an apprenticeship,nearly two-thirds (32%) believe they are too old and that the age limit is between 16 and 24. A quarter (25%) felt that apprenticeships would be a step down given their career experience.

The research also asked employees what the biggest obstacles to making a career change were. Three in 10 (30%) cited family or financial commitments, with a further 17% stating that a lack of confidence and that they would need to change their mindset. Nineteen per cent believed their lack of qualifications prohibits a change while the same proportion said they have no understanding of how to go about switching careers, and 14% said they are put off by the time it takes to retrain.

When asked what could support them to make a change, more than a quarter (26%) stated a change of mindset, followed by investment in training and/or educational qualifications or new skills (17%), support in the form of outside funding or a grant (12%), and government and/or industry support with further initiatives (11%).

CEO of Jobrapido Rob Brouwer said that age should not be a barrier to those looking to start an apprenticeship: “Despite the majority of the UK workforce being open to the possibility of apprenticeships, the vast majority have already ruled this out as they believe there is an age barrier in order to access [them]. The reality is that apprenticeships are open [to people] above the age of 16 and there is no age barrier.”

“Despite the majority of the UK workforce being open to the possibility of apprenticeships, the vast majority have already ruled this out as they believe there is an age barrier in order to access [them]. The reality is that apprenticeships are open [to people] above the age of 16 and there is no age barrier.”

He said that the government should work with education providers to reach out to workers who might consider themselves “too old” to embark on an apprenticeship.

“There has been a big drive in recent years to encourage more apprenticeships in the UK… Yet perception lags behind reality about the criteria and age of apprenticeships. This in turn is preventing more of the UK workforce from capitalising on the opportunities to retrain, acquire new skills and gain confidence in the workplace. All of which lay the right foundation to build an entirely new career,” he said.

“What is needed is an education drive from UK industry, the government, educational establishments and employers as to how anyone over the age of 16 can access and embark on an apprenticeship.”

Brouwer added that on the whole people no longer want a job for life. “We live in an era where a job is no longer a job for life and many could have at least two or even three different careers in their working life. It is not surprising that so many who took part in the research harbour ambitions to change their career path,” he said.

Jobrapido surveyed 1,444 employees who work across different industry sectors including sales, marketing, engineering, transportation, construction and technology in July 2019.

Survey Shows Careers Guidance for Young People has Improved Over the Last Two Years

Careers guidance for young people has improved over the last two years, according to a large-scale survey of schools.

The research points to the successful early establishment of a new cohort of senior ‘Careers Leaders’ with responsibility for driving a whole school approach towards careers support.

The survey of 750 Careers Leaders reveals that they feel positive about the future of careers provision and the impact they’re having on young people, and have the backing of their senior leadership teams.

Previous research from Education & Employers has shown high quality careers support and employer engagement has a positive impact on young people’s gradesemployment prospects and future earnings.

In 2017, the Government’s Careers Strategy set an ambitious plan for every school in England to appoint a named Careers Leaders with ’the energy, commitment and backing from senior leadership’ to deliver a comprehensive careers programme. 

The research – carried out on behalf of The Gatsby Foundation and The Careers & Enterprise Company – represents the first comprehensive survey of Careers Leaders.

It reveals they are overwhelmingly positive about the approach set out in the Careers Strategy and the outcomes for young people:

  • 88% say their role is having a positive impact on young peoples’ outcomes
  • 81% feel positive about the future of careers provision
  • 75% think careers provision has improved since the Careers Strategy

The Careers Strategy called on schools and Careers Leaders to work towards meeting all eight of the Gatsby Benchmarks of Good Careers Guidance – a set of standards based on international best practice.

The survey reveals that 94% of Careers Leaders said the Gatsby Benchmarks had helped to improve careers guidance. This follows findings published last year showing schools across the country improving against the Benchmarks.

Careers Leaders are a relatively new part of the school workforce, with two-thirds appointed within the last two school years. But the research finds that school leaders are backing the reforms and their focus on ensuring Careers Leaders are senior or have senior access in schools – 83% of Careers Leaders are either part of their school’s senior leadership team or report directly into senior leadership

The research also finds that Careers Leaders spend twice as much time on careers as ‘careers-coordinators’ did a decade ago, underlining the increased prioritisation of careers by schools.

Claudia Harris, Chief Executive of the Careers & Enterprise Company, said:

“According to this major survey across 750 schools, Careers leaders are overwhelmingly positive about the direction of careers support in schools. The significance of this lack of cynicism should not be underestimated. They value what they are doing and see the benefits for their students.

“The survey finds that Careers Leaders are in senior positions or report into the SLT, representing a marked shift in the profile of careers to central in school agendas. High quality careers and enterprise support is increasingly being used by schools as a core pillar to ensure excellent long-term outcomes for their students.

“We see it in the progress every day: across the country careers support is improving in schools, and particularly in the most disadvantaged communities. This is down to the commitment of Careers Leaders and the school leaders that back them.”

Sir John Holman, Senior Adviser to the Gatsby Foundation and author of the Good Career Guidance report, said:

“The pilot of the Gatsby Benchmarks in the North East of England showed us that the key success factor is having an effective Careers Leader, with access to the senior leadership of the school or college.

“It is very encouraging to see that schools are truly making this role a priority, and that those in post feel so confident about the future. This research gives valuable insight into how Careers Leaders can be best supported and enabled to do their job, which is critical to the future of every young person in the school.”

The survey was carried out by independent research organisation SQW, on behalf of The Gatsby Foundation and The Careers & Enterprise Company. 750 Careers Leaders responded to the survey, and results were weighted to be representative of schools across the country.

Field work took place between 4th March and 5th April 2019. The survey achieved a response rate of 22% and 750 schools. Responses were weighted be representative of region, type of school and size of school.

60% of Gen Z Know What Career They Want Before They Are 20
June 21, 2019
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New research has identified that over half (53%) of 16-20-year-olds wouldn’t consider a career in hospitality.

The top reasons for this are it’s seen as ‘a stepping stone to another career’, as having ‘limited career prospects’ and viewed as ‘a part-time job while studying’ – posing the question, do hospitality careers need a re-brand?

The results, which are from a new study by HIT Training and Get My First Job, highlight the worrying perceptions the younger generation have of hospitality careers and the need for the sector to address these and open the door to future talent. Read more

Financial Returns, Job Prospects and Lifestyle Factors – Post-18 Choices
June 13, 2019
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Young people are making decisions about what they plan to do after leaving formal education as early as Year 7 or 8, with parents, teachers and friends being their preferred information sources, according to a new report,Choices students make between different post-18 education routes” by the University of Warwick’s Institute for Employment Research for the Department for Education.

While school pupils who were aiming for university report being well-provided with information, advice, and guidance, young people considering technical or vocational options can feel left out, with school sources perceived as pushing HE as the preferred option for most.

Report author Peter Dickinson, Senior Research Fellow at IER, said:

“The evidence clearly shows that young people start to make their post-16 choices at an early age.  This means that careers advice and guidance needs to start earlier, even in primary school. This is particularly the case for disadvantaged young people who are less likely to progress into higher education and more likely to become NEET (not in education, employment or training).”

The study, commissioned to inform the Government’s thinking on post-18 education, also found that: Read more

AI Careers Unappealing to UK Workers
June 11, 2019
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Government data finds that many are uninterested in a career in AI as BEIS announces plans to boost technology skill.

Only 39% of people are interested in a career in AI with 59% of those aged under 45, according to research by the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (BEIS) and Kantar Public.

The report, which was released for London Tech Week this week, also found a gender divide over interest in AI jobs. Just 31% of women said they’d be interested compared to 47% of men.

More than 60% of people were excited to see what AI can do, however, and awareness levels of AI in everyday life were found to be more than 60%. Read more

Older Employees Feel Undervalued
May 23, 2019
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More than half of over-60s want to continue working but are concerned about age discrimination and lack of career progression, according to research from AvivImage result for older workers

Nearly one in five (19%) of those surveyed feel that younger colleagues are favoured over older generations, while the same number (19%) believe their age has become a barrier to career progression and development.

However, more than half (53%) of employees aged 60 and older are not ready to retire, increasing to 61% for people still working past the age of 65, the research found. The majority (73%) of those in their fifties and sixties feel they share invaluable skills, experience and knowledge with colleagues, but 16% believe this is not valued by their employer. Read more

Ageing Better Consultation
April 12, 2019
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Please see a request below from Ageing Better regarding a consultation they are undertaking into improving recruitment outcomes for Image result for centre for Ageingolder job candidates.

Ageing Better are about to begin a programme of work looking at improving recruitment outcomes for older job candidates. As part of this we are conducting a month-long consultation process to ensure that we have as good an understanding of the topic as possible before designing and commissioning said programme of work. I thought that you would be able to offer some useful insight on this topic, and would very much appreciate if you could answer some of our consultation questions (see below) or suggest a colleague who might be able to respond.

Further details can be found in this document, but the questions.

we are looking to answer through this consultation are: Read more
Four International Reports Related to Career Development
March 20, 2019
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World Development Report 2019: The Changing Nature of Work (World Bank)

This report studies how the nature of work is changing as a result of advances in technology. Fears that robots will take away jobsfrom people have dominated the discussion over the future of work, but the World Development Report 2019 finds that, on balance, this appears to be unfounded.

Investing in Refugee Talent: Lessons Learned in Labour Market Integration (Hire Immigrants, Cities of Migration and BertelsmannStiftung)

This report shares 13 international best practices in refugee labour market integration, which all represent the pivotal role of employment in the integration of refugees and the private sector as a key stakeholder in receiving communities. Read more

Age Discrimination Biggest Obstacle to Re-entering Employment
February 15, 2019
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Age discrimination is the biggest obstacle preventing people from getting back into employment, according to jobsite Jobrapido reports HR Magazine.

It surveyed 2,027 people in the UK currently not in education, employment or training and who had previously worked in management, executive, administrative or manual labour positions.

The research found that almost a quarter of respondents (24%) believe the biggest obstacle to getting a new job is their age and that the role they apply for is given to a younger candidate. Other obstacles included not being able to find a suitable role (11%), that they frequently go to interviews but are rejected (11%), poor health (9%), and not being sure what job they want (6%).

When asked about the challenges securing their job of choice, 32% said the skills needed are very different from when they first started out, 29% said the market is too competitive and the jobs tend to go to people in-house before they’re published externally, and 14% said the development of technology has meant some jobs are now redundant.

Rob Brouwer, CEO of Jobrapido, said that the results reveal age discrimination is still at play in the hiring process. “In spite of the progress of UK employment law and measures to mitigate against the risk of discrimination, it is clear that some companies are not giving candidates a fair playing field,” he said.

“It is disappointing that so many of those trying to get a job believe that age counts against them when their experience should be seen as an asset. HR departments should be scrutinising their equality policies and ensuring that all applicants, regardless of age, are given a detailed breakdown of why they were unsuccessful. Transparency is crucial.”

The research also found that nearly a third (30%) of respondents have lost their confidence and do not feel they can get a job anymore. A further 30% have had to cut back on their spending and change their lifestyle.

Respondents also cited wanting more guidance on the jobs they should apply for. Seventeen per cent would like advice on how to improve their CV, 14% would like better interview feedback so they can learn from their mistakes, and 8% would like advice on how to improve their interview technique or careers counselling to feel more confident.

Brouwer added that, while it is important for candidates to be prepared for interviews, employers could play a stronger role in helping to improve the confidence of those seeking work: “This is a strong call to action for those working in the recruitment industry and to employers and HR professionals to look at ways they could support and help those trying to get employment. This could include running CV workshops, career counselling sessions, a masterclass on interview techniques, how to answer challenging questions, or guidance as to what jobs might be suitable for their existing skills.”

Nearly a third of those surveyed (30%) had been out of work for three to 12 months, 9% for one to two years, 6% for three to five years and 21% for more than five years.

The Canadian Journal of Career Development
February 12, 2019
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The Canadian Journal of Career Development is a partnership project between CERIC and Memorial University of Newfoundland with the support of the Counselling Foundation of Canada.

In this issue